Could I Have Spyware On My PC?

Smausage

Estimable
Jul 20, 2015
4
0
4,510
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My dad knows almost everything there is to know about computers at this point--His jobs have been centered around them for as long as I can remember, and he got a masters degree in networking. He also likes to put spyware on my computers. If there's a way for him to monitor my computer he will, and this computer probably had every type there is, as it was in his house for several years. I don't live with him at the moment, and he, or more so his wife, have strict rules about computer usage--As in I can only use it for like an hour a day. Like I said, I moved, but I would like to know if he could have spyware on here, so I could remove it. I have replaced the existing hard drive--So there's no way for there to be any on there, but is there some other form of abstract spyware? I could imagine some sort of device he could have hid in the power supply that monitors the temperature, or something in that realm. I know a bit about computers myself, although I'm far from an expert, and I know next to nothing about spyware, never having used it. Am I just being paranoid--Is replacing the hard drive enough, or are there other ways he can spy on me?
 

Ralston18

Dignified
Moderator
Smausage:

This is not likely to be the answer you wish.

If you are not of legal age and/or live in your dad's home (even part time) then things are simple: you must abide by his rules.

Should that be the case as it appears then providing any specific answers would, in my mind, run afoul of forum rules.

What needs to be addressed (the real problem) is the breakdown of communications and trust. What efforts have you made to work out some compromises with respect to computer time/use versus meeting your household expections with respect to things such as chores, school work/grades, part time work, or otherwise contributing to the welfare of the family whole? Not a lecture - just a consideration question......

Give some thought to how you can demonstrate more responsibility and maturity. Work out an agreement that fits the situation. Compromise and then hold up your end of the bargain. Find a trusted advisor or counselor (other family, adult friends, teacher) to help you.

If you are of legal age (which we have no way of knowing or verifying) then as an adult only you can decide what actions to take if you feel you are being spied on. Such spying becomes a legal matter that I am not at all able to address nor at all comfortable with even commenting on.

This post may or may not bring about additional posts and comments.

In any case, I truly hope that all of you are still in a place where communications and some compromise is still possible.

Face the problem head on - no work around.
 

Smausage

Estimable
Jul 20, 2015
4
0
4,510
0


The thing is, I don't live with him. If he did have spyware on here and noticed I've returned to my previous schedule of using a computer between 7-12 hours/ day that would cause a bunch drama that I'd rather avoid.
 

Ralston18

Dignified
Moderator
Very sure that helping circumvent parental rights and controls or even just some family agreement/understanding is outside this forum's perview.

There are most likely reasons, personal and professional, for his concern with your time on the computer.

That said I will fall back on my suggestion that you find a neutral third party to help resolve the matter(s) involved.

 

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