Editing & Encoding in two different softwares

chaitanya singh

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is there any way to edit video in one software and encode it in different software. Apparanly I am new to this so please be patient.
I have Adobe Premier Pro CC installed but
it takes too much time to encode video and hence my CPU temp rise to high.
I am thinking of using Badaboom as I have Nvidea Graphics card installed on my computer.
So is it possible to use Pre Pro for editing and Badlaboom for encoding.
 

randomizer

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It's not entirely black and white. Some encoders handle some types of source material better than others, and this will be further affected by the settings you specify. Badaboom has some limitations as a GPU-based encoder, but its main problem is that it was designed with mobile devices in mind, where the small screens make it more difficult to notice compression artifacts. Quality is sacrificed to keep bitrates and encode times down. Other encoders are not opinionated about the target device and give you more flexibility to choose whether to prioritise encode speed, file size, quality, or something in between. x264 is a prime example. It has a dizzying number of options if you want to get your hands dirty (it also has presets so you don't need to).

For what it's worth, a 10kbps video is just going to look like noise regardless of the encoder you choose.
 

Phillip Corcoran

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Whatever app you use for editing your video, you would have to "save" it with that same app when editing is complete, which essentially is the same as encoding.

Now, there is nothing to stop you converting that video with a third-party video converter if you want, but that's not what you are asking. You can't edit video then somehow "suspend" it in memory while you encode it with different software.

Anyway, I don't think it will make any difference in processing time which software you use. I think your hardware may be lacking in the "oomph" department. That's what you need to address. Video-editing/encoding is very reliant on high-end hardware if you want to avoid long processing times.
 

chaitanya singh

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Sorry but actually my CPU heats up in just 2 to 3 minutes to 70C and if I let it go on it is not possible. It takes about 16mins to encode video of 200mb approx. I have i5 760 2.8Ghz CPU installed in my system. As I said Pre pro does not use GPU during encoding that's why I needed Badlaboom to encode my edited video in PrePro.
 

hang-the-9

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That is exactly what happens when you encode video, it uses the CPU a lot, using a different program won't help. 70C is perfectly fine for that CPU if you are talking about the core temps. If you want to lower temperature, remove the heatsink, clean it off and the CPU and apply some new good quality thermal paste.
 

randomizer

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If you use Badaboom your GPU will heat up to 70C (or more) and you'll end up with an inferior video to what you can achieve in Premiere Pro. You can't escape the heat issue, you just need to manage it.
 

chaitanya singh

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Isn't encoding just a standard process does it differ from sw from sw. I thought it all depended upon the format and bit rate and stuff options that are available in all encoding s/ws. Sorry as I said new to this so
yeah.
 

chaitanya singh

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Problem is it reaches to 70C in just two to three mins of encoding and as I said it goes on getting higher. Assuming it stops getting higher at some point say 80C or 90C how long can I keep it going before reducing CPU lifespan.

 

USAFRet

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"Assuming it stops..."
What does it actually stop at?
 

chaitanya singh

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I haven't tried encoding any further than 70C CPU fan starts to run at 1920rpm and making louder sounds. As I am new to this.

 

hang-the-9

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That's not a problem, that is exactly what will happen. When you start the encoding, CPU goes up to pretty much 100% and heats up. If you are afraid for the CPU, don't run video encoding on it, or get a good after-market cooler to keep temps down more. You can look up the temperature range for the CPU online, and then see how hot it gets. There is absolutely no way to run any type of CPU task and not have it heat up. And yes, the fan will spin faster as the CPU heats up, that is also normal. If you drive, you will notice your engine gets louder the faster you go, do you slow down then because it may reduce the life of the engine? I'm guessing not, because it's made to run that way, same thing for the CPU and fan. The only issue would be if the CPU got TOO hot, which it has not yet.
 

randomizer

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It differs between different applications. That is why they often have quite different options available to configure the encoder. The only thing that is typically standardised is the process of decoding the video and audio streams. This means that the encoding algorithm must output streams that conform to the specification to ensure that any device can decode them. How it arrives at that result (ie. how it determines the best approximation of the original streams using the selected settings) is up to the algorithm designer.
 

chaitanya singh

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Meaning 10kbps bitrate will be more accurately encoded in better sw?

 

randomizer

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It's not entirely black and white. Some encoders handle some types of source material better than others, and this will be further affected by the settings you specify. Badaboom has some limitations as a GPU-based encoder, but its main problem is that it was designed with mobile devices in mind, where the small screens make it more difficult to notice compression artifacts. Quality is sacrificed to keep bitrates and encode times down. Other encoders are not opinionated about the target device and give you more flexibility to choose whether to prioritise encode speed, file size, quality, or something in between. x264 is a prime example. It has a dizzying number of options if you want to get your hands dirty (it also has presets so you don't need to).

For what it's worth, a 10kbps video is just going to look like noise regardless of the encoder you choose.
 
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