I tried vinyl for the first time — what I love and hate

kep55

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Some tips from an old vinyl over.
  1. NEVER handle a record by the grooves. ALWAYS hold it by the edge.
  2. Clean the record with a good cleaner and lint free cloth when first used and after several plays.
  3. ALWAYS keep the dust cover closed except when changing records.
  4. Check the needle for lint every time you start the fist record.
  5. Properly balance the tone arm so it barely touches the record. Too much force will ruin both the record and the needle.
  6. Quality turntables have anti-skating and an adjustable counter balance. Don't even consider a turntable without both.
  7. The old argument was which was better - direct drive and belt drive. Personally, I preferred belt drives as the helped isolate the motor from the pick-up / needle.
  8. Better turntables have the turntable on some type of suspension. Some even has sprung feet under the turntable. Both are to reduce outside vibrations.
  9. Don't put the turntable on the amp or too close to the speakers. Vibration & heat. And lastly...
  10. Old school method to take warping out of record - Place record on top of console television with a dictionary large enough to cover the record. Most of the warping will be gone after an evening of watching the telly.
Bonus: NEVER store record flat or outside of the dust sleeve & jacket. Always store on edge as verticallt as possible. And remove the cello wrapping. It can cause the sleeve to bend and then warp the record.
 
Aug 23, 2022
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I've owned a small vinyl collection for several years but I just got the chance to spin them on a record player — here's what happened.

I tried vinyl for the first time — what I love and hate : Read more
You need to look at the huge catalog that's out there from previous owners. I am 73, I have hundreds of albums purchased in my youth. They need to find a home. Some are really well loved and played. Some are very clean. There are people all over the world who have albums and singles. Look around and find surprises.


Some tips from an old vinyl over.
  1. NEVER handle a record by the grooves. ALWAYS hold it by the edge.
  2. Clean the record with a good cleaner and lint free cloth when first used and after several plays.
  3. ALWAYS keep the dust cover closed except when changing records.
  4. Check the needle for lint every time you start the fist record.
  5. Properly balance the tone arm so it barely touches the record. Too much force will ruin both the record and the needle.
  6. Quality turntables have anti-skating and an adjustable counter balance. Don't even consider a turntable without both.
  7. The old argument was which was better - direct drive and belt drive. Personally, I preferred belt drives as the helped isolate the motor from the pick-up / needle.
  8. Better turntables have the turntable on some type of suspension. Some even has sprung feet under the turntable. Both are to reduce outside vibrations.
  9. Don't put the turntable on the amp or too close to the speakers. Vibration & heat. And lastly...
  10. Old school method to take warping out of record - Place record on top of console television with a dictionary large enough to cover the record. Most of the warping will be gone after an evening of watching the telly.
Bonus: NEVER store record flat or outside of the dust sleeve & jacket. Always store on edge as verticallt as possible. And remove the cello wrapping. It can cause the sleeve to bend and then warp the record.
 
Aug 24, 2022
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Rather enjoyed reading this article. I, too, decided to delve into the vinyl market after being curious as to what all the hype was about. I opted for a reasonably cheap turntable, but have amassed a fair number of vinyls since acquiring this piece of equipment. I must be honest and say I didn't encounter any of the setup difficulties that the writer did! Basically, I was able to unpack the turntable, plug it in at the wall and start playing!
There is no doubt that the vinyls themselves are costly compared to other formats of music, but if you are searching for that authentic, traditional sound (that crackle!) then you have certainly made the right choice! I think comparing running a turntable to driving a manual car is a sound analogy. It really doesn't involve much effort though, switching between sides or artists and for me, is part of the joy of the whole experience.
It is true to say that other means of listening to music may well be more manageable/convenient, but I have to admit that there is a sense of wonder around the whole vinyl scene; an aura.
I have had some problems with my vinyls, that I wouldn't have streaming my music digitally, namely issues of the record jumping. So, thanks to kep55 for the long list of tips and advice that will prove useful, as I am still to this day learning.
Overall, I can now understand why there has been a revival on the Vinyl front, something that I expect to continue, as more and more music lovers rediscover or simply discover what can only be described as a 'true' listening experience.
 
Feb 26, 2022
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Seriously, you're not going to be able to appreciate vinyl with that Lenco turntable. You'd need a proper one, a proper cartridge, with proper amp and speakers. That's just for casual listening, if you're not interested in audio quality, but even then you're losing the convenience of the CD format without getting anything in return really.
Besides, preferring LPs over CDs only makes sense in very few instances of audiophile, AAA reissues, or for vintage original pressings... Generally speaking, most of today's reissues are sourced from digital and there's no way those are going to sound better on LP than CD
 
Aug 25, 2022
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I do something that will sound crazy, but is what people did when playing vinyl on radio stations. here it goes. you should first wash your record with running water using soap and your own hands as a brush. as soon as it finished, play the record completely wet. you will get rid of the cracks and keep your collection shiny in the meantime.
 
Feb 26, 2022
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That's very funny, thank you for that...
Just don't try it if your cartridge is $1000 worth, or above
:giggle::giggle::giggle:
 
Aug 25, 2022
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The users who mentioned your Lenco will not give you the experience you deserve are absolutely correct. However, what they did not mention is that players such as that and Crosley players is they are harmful to your albums.

By having the speaker (which involves a moving diaphragm to create sound) in the turntable unit (or too close, etc.), the vibration will push the needle against the side of the groves in a way which will give one or two of several degenerative effects on the sound. Either this will produce a noticeable reverb or decrease the sharp edges needed for the reproduction of certain sounds.

See the YouTube channel vinyleyezz, especially the video "Are You DESTROYING Your Records?"
 
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