ISPs Dishing Out Warnings to P2P Pirates Soon

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amk-aka-Phantom

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Does this new "system" seem more like a ploy to stop subscribers from hogging up bandwidth using peer-to-peer networks rather than serving as a means to stop piracy?
You know, I've had ENOUGH of this BS. "Hogging" bandwidth? If I pay for high-speed UNLIMITED plan, make sure I get what I am paying for and don't expect me to just check email and read news. I'll OBVIOUSLY be downloading a LOT, that's what I am paying for. Get your stuff together and keep upgrading your equipment instead of trying to limit the customers on what they can get out of their money.
 

wanderer11

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This makes me happy to have WOW!. I read that those isps will be reducing speed after multiple letters are sent. They sure better be giving a massive discount to people if they aren't giving their full speed.
 

Maxor127

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So basically it's an excuse for throttling the connection of P2P users. How are they going to determine if content is illegal or not? My guess is they won't.
 

jellico

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Yeah, this is completely crap. I already got one warning a couple of weeks ago (Comcast). It's not like I'm downloading a bunch of movies and CDs. I missed an episode of Sons of Anarchy, so I downloaded it. Honestly, I don't see how this is any different than asking to borrow a friend's VCR recording (for those of you old enough to remember when people actually did stuff like that). I actually got into watching Sons of Anarchy from an episode that I downloaded to see what it was all about. I then proceeded to purchase all 3 seasons (and then the 4th season when that came out).

The warning message included the file name, size, and a warning that it is a copyrighted work (I'd like to know how they can prove that without being able to run an MD5 hash of MY copy of that file). Ok, so now that they've annoyed me with this, I'll just end up getting a subscription to a proxy/anonymizing service like BTGuard. Comcast and the RIAA and the MPAA (and any of these other groups) can go frack themselves, because now I'm not going to spend another dime purchasing their stuff.
 

bigdragon

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I hope the ISPs are enjoying their new roles as copyright police. This is a road I'm sure they'll soon regret going down. They should act as fat, dumb, bit pipes. Inspecting the data any user is accessing online is an invasion of privacy regardless of what the data contains. P2P pirates will just start encrypting their stuff. Then CAS will have to adapt. Then the pirates will do something else. You can't win this cat and mouse game. ISPs should be pouring resources into upgrading their networks, not playing copyright police.
 
G

Guest

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Take the letter and throw it in the trash. It means nothing. ISP's should refuse to hassle their customers. It's already been proved that an IP adress cannot be linked to a particular user.

If you have unlimited bandwith, then install Tor as an exit node. You'll get tons of letters. And you'll be 100% safe. How fun!
 

nurgletheunclean

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The CAS system is nothing more than bandwidth/ip monitoring. Lets take for example a movie, all the ISP would see is a number of packets (even if from a single seed) coming in out of order. The torrent client has the map of the size and order of each of the pieces plus any checksums. There's just to little info at the packet level for the ISP to discern what's being downloaded. Unless they have an actual client that attaches to the torrent and watches your completion status and validates the finished file as being actual copyrighted material, there's little evidence they can actually do anything with other than make a guess and issue a warning. Start encrypting packets and it gets even harder.

@festerovic
your VPN only encrypts the traffic in your tunnel. As soon as you leave the VPN network that traffic is going to go the normal way. Example you have a laptop with a VPN client attached to your home network via VPN, without a split tunnel so all your laptop traffic goes through your VPN. It simply goes to your home network gets unencrypted and heads out to the internet. VPNs only encrypt very specific locations.
 

PhilFrisbie

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[citation]@festerovicyour VPN only encrypts the traffic in your tunnel. As soon as you leave the VPN network that traffic is going to go the normal way. Example you have a laptop with a VPN client attached to your home network via VPN, without a split tunnel so all your laptop traffic goes through your VPN. It simply goes to your home network gets unencrypted and heads out to the internet. VPNs only encrypt very specific locations.[/citation]
Yes, but if you have an ISP that is monitoring you, but your VPN server is on an ISP that DOES NOT monitor, you will be good to go.
 

nurgletheunclean

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[citation][nom]PhilFrisbie[/nom]Yes, but if you have an ISP that is monitoring you, but your VPN server is on an ISP that DOES NOT monitor, you will be good to go.[/citation]
What would be that non-monitoring endpoint? Your work? How would you know it's not monitored? Perhaps your are the network admin at a remote site and you have the ability to tunnel your traffic through some company VPN that doesn't use a monitoring service. Lucky you, this is an impractical solution for most people.
 

jackbling

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[citation][nom]jellico[/nom]Yeah, this is completely crap. I already got one warning a couple of weeks ago (Comcast). It's not like I'm downloading a bunch of movies and CDs. I missed an episode of Sons of Anarchy, so I downloaded it. Honestly, I don't see how this is any different than asking to borrow a friend's VCR recording (for those of you old enough to remember when people actually did stuff like that). I actually got into watching Sons of Anarchy from an episode that I downloaded to see what it was all about. I then proceeded to purchase all 3 seasons (and then the 4th season when that came out).The warning message included the file name, size, and a warning that it is a copyrighted work (I'd like to know how they can prove that without being able to run an MD5 hash of MY copy of that file). Ok, so now that they've annoyed me with this, I'll just end up getting a subscription to a proxy/anonymizing service like BTGuard. Comcast and the RIAA and the MPAA (and any of these other groups) can go frack themselves, because now I'm not going to spend another dime purchasing their stuff.[/citation]

giganews
newsbin
quickpar

SSL download, available over multiple ports

They can see you downloading, but they cant see what.
 

dalethepcman

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If I were on one of these horrible ISP's, I would spin up a copy of TPB on a netbook connected to my open wireless router and shove it in a closet...

Give them such a huge amount of requests that it become unprofitable for them to maintain these systems. Just the paper/postage alone of sending out thousands of these a month must hurt their bottom line. Now imagine if they had to send out one every day for every subscriber....
 
G

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The jews are butt hurt that we won't buy their garbage. How are they supposed to cleanse the promised land of infidels if they cannot afford a new set of rockets to shoot into the gaza strip.
 

Onus

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Our top priority has been to make sure the program works well for consumers in every way, to ensure accuracy, protect customer privacy and offer resources that answer consumers’ questions."
What a load of poop. This is NOT to the benefit of consumers in ANY way. I also see it possibly introducing latency, the bane of online gamers.
 

wiyosaya

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[citation][nom]jellico[/nom]Yeah, this is completely crap. I already got one warning a couple of weeks ago (Comcast). It's not like I'm downloading a bunch of movies and CDs. I missed an episode of Sons of Anarchy, so I downloaded it. Honestly, I don't see how this is any different than asking to borrow a friend's VCR recording (for those of you old enough to remember when people actually did stuff like that). I actually got into watching Sons of Anarchy from an episode that I downloaded to see what it was all about. I then proceeded to purchase all 3 seasons (and then the 4th season when that came out).The warning message included the file name, size, and a warning that it is a copyrighted work (I'd like to know how they can prove that without being able to run an MD5 hash of MY copy of that file). Ok, so now that they've annoyed me with this, I'll just end up getting a subscription to a proxy/anonymizing service like BTGuard. Comcast and the RIAA and the MPAA (and any of these other groups) can go frack themselves, because now I'm not going to spend another dime purchasing their stuff.[/citation]
Yes, there are studies that people who download actually buy the material like you. With this monitoring crap, the ability to download and determine whether or not you like the material before you buy will once again be limited. From that viewpoint, this becomes another way for copyright owners to foist crap on their customers.

What would be really interesting is if sales of legitimate material decrease once this is fully implemented by all ISPs.
 

jaber2

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I used to work for an ISP back the in the day, we used to call people who were on unlimited plans and telling them they were using too much and had to switch to business limited plans where they pay for extra use, so no, this ain't new, they limit my plan for any reason see-ya, next ISP is waiting in line to offer the same thing
 
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