Laptop Start up Problem & Battery Charging Problem.

koolgoal

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Nov 18, 2014
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I have Acer aspire laptop in which I am getting two problems..
1. My laptop starts up when plugged in by charger but at that time the battery dosent charge.It remains sames % of charge after many hours of work .
2. If I want to work without charging with the available charge in the battery the laptop starts for few seconds and then shuts down with click sound.Sometimes it starts up for some minutes but then again after a click sound the laptop shuts down.
 
I'm betting this is an old or heavily used laptop. You likely need a new battery.

Lithium ion batteries are only good for a few hundred charge/discharge cycles. If you fully charge/fully discharge it all the time, it may last only 100-300 cycles. If you partially discharged it most of the time, it may last 500+ cycles. As it starts wearing out, the amount of charge it'll hold decreases and the laptop will last a shorter and shorter amount of time on battery. At the end stages, the battery will charge for several hours, and only last a few minutes. It sounds like you're at this stage. The only solution is to buy a new battery.

Try to get a new battery. Avoid used ones on eBay even though they're priced lower. You don't know how many cycles they've been used, so they may end up in the same state after a few months of use. If you're planning to replace the laptop soon anyway, it's probably better just to live with the useless battery until you get the new laptop.

If you do get a new battery, you can reduce the amount of charge cycle wear in a few ways:

  • ■ Avoid completely discharging the battery whenever possible. Charge it ASAP instead of letting it run down below about 15%. Discharges completely to 0% are terrible for battery longevity.
    ■ If at all possible, avoid charging the battery to 100%. Some newer laptops have battery saving software you can activate which will limit the max charge state. Some of Sony's laptops let you limit it to 80%. The Thinkpads have software which let you set the max charge % manually.
    ■ If your laptop has no such function, remove the battery from the laptop once it's reached about 80%-90% charge. Use the laptop on just AC power. Put the battery in only if you need to use the laptop without AC power. You can charge it up to 100% if you'll need every drop of juice, but try to use it at 80%-90% max charge most of the time.
All electric vehicles using lithium batteries limit their min/max charges to about 25%-75% specifically to avoid this problem. e.g. The Chevy Volt has a 16 kWh battery, but only 10.3 kWh of that is usable. The rest is reserved as buffer at the low and high end to reduce battery wear.
 
I'm betting this is an old or heavily used laptop. You likely need a new battery.

Lithium ion batteries are only good for a few hundred charge/discharge cycles. If you fully charge/fully discharge it all the time, it may last only 100-300 cycles. If you partially discharged it most of the time, it may last 500+ cycles. As it starts wearing out, the amount of charge it'll hold decreases and the laptop will last a shorter and shorter amount of time on battery. At the end stages, the battery will charge for several hours, and only last a few minutes. It sounds like you're at this stage. The only solution is to buy a new battery.

Try to get a new battery. Avoid used ones on eBay even though they're priced lower. You don't know how many cycles they've been used, so they may end up in the same state after a few months of use. If you're planning to replace the laptop soon anyway, it's probably better just to live with the useless battery until you get the new laptop.

If you do get a new battery, you can reduce the amount of charge cycle wear in a few ways:

  • ■ Avoid completely discharging the battery whenever possible. Charge it ASAP instead of letting it run down below about 15%. Discharges completely to 0% are terrible for battery longevity.
    ■ If at all possible, avoid charging the battery to 100%. Some newer laptops have battery saving software you can activate which will limit the max charge state. Some of Sony's laptops let you limit it to 80%. The Thinkpads have software which let you set the max charge % manually.
    ■ If your laptop has no such function, remove the battery from the laptop once it's reached about 80%-90% charge. Use the laptop on just AC power. Put the battery in only if you need to use the laptop without AC power. You can charge it up to 100% if you'll need every drop of juice, but try to use it at 80%-90% max charge most of the time.
All electric vehicles using lithium batteries limit their min/max charges to about 25%-75% specifically to avoid this problem. e.g. The Chevy Volt has a 16 kWh battery, but only 10.3 kWh of that is usable. The rest is reserved as buffer at the low and high end to reduce battery wear.
 
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