Need adapter: Dual mono (1/8") phone plugs (from PC) to stereo phone socket (for headphones)

dddiam

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PC laptops typically have three 1/8" phone sockets, two for headphones (left and right mono) and one for a mic. Also tower or desktop sound cards use this interface.

Studio type headphones have a single stereo phone plug.

I am surprised that I cannot find an adapter to go from standard headphones to a PC. Why is such an adapter not that common?

Suggestions?

David D.
 

Ralston18

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Here is an old link that may help:

http://h30434.www3.hp.com/t5/Notebook-Audio/No-stereo-playback-on-HP-Pavilion-dv6-notebook/td-p/250417

Also:

I found the Maintenance Manual for the dv6 or at least some version of it - seems to support two mono audio output ports. But I also found an "Entertainment Model" that seemed to have stereo audio ports.

Look at the labels and see if you can find the model number. Or go to HP's website and enter the laptop's serial number if you can obtain the full laptop specifications in that manner.

This link provides some possible adapters:

http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/YPP136?adpos=1o1&creative=54989267161&device=c&matchtype=&network=g&gclid=CJPm9sW7w84CFdBahgod-aYHpA

I think you will need the (1) TRS Female to (2) TS Male adapter. (Tip, Ring Sleeve). What the adapter will do is take the respective Right and Left Speaker mono channels (TS male plugs) and convert them for stereo headset (TRS) use. The headset plug being 3.5mm (1/8") TRS male.

Key is to verify that the laptop ports are mono and that the pinouts (connectivity) and plug genders are as I currently understand them to be.

Google TS, TRS, TRRS for further understanding of the specific connections that must be matched.
 

Ralston18

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Moderator
Not sure about your premise regarding two headphone ports (left and right mono)....

There are some sound cards with two individual speaker ports but most sound card now have a stereo port for audio out.

What sound card are you using?
 

dddiam

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I have an HP Pavilion dv6 (Core i7, 64-bit) laptop with a built-in NVIDIA GEFORCE with CU0A. I am not sure of the model number. The dual mono audio jacks are labeled with a headphone symbol, but I also use them for external speakers.


 

Ralston18

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Moderator
Here is an old link that may help:

http://h30434.www3.hp.com/t5/Notebook-Audio/No-stereo-playback-on-HP-Pavilion-dv6-notebook/td-p/250417

Also:

I found the Maintenance Manual for the dv6 or at least some version of it - seems to support two mono audio output ports. But I also found an "Entertainment Model" that seemed to have stereo audio ports.

Look at the labels and see if you can find the model number. Or go to HP's website and enter the laptop's serial number if you can obtain the full laptop specifications in that manner.

This link provides some possible adapters:

http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/YPP136?adpos=1o1&creative=54989267161&device=c&matchtype=&network=g&gclid=CJPm9sW7w84CFdBahgod-aYHpA

I think you will need the (1) TRS Female to (2) TS Male adapter. (Tip, Ring Sleeve). What the adapter will do is take the respective Right and Left Speaker mono channels (TS male plugs) and convert them for stereo headset (TRS) use. The headset plug being 3.5mm (1/8") TRS male.

Key is to verify that the laptop ports are mono and that the pinouts (connectivity) and plug genders are as I currently understand them to be.

Google TS, TRS, TRRS for further understanding of the specific connections that must be matched.
 

dddiam

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Thank you, Ralson18. All of your information has been helpful.

I have seen the type of adaptor that you suggested. I was looking for something similar but with 1/8" rather than 1/4" plugs. I know that I could add additional adaptors to go from 1/4" to 1/8", but my fear was that each additional adaptor adds a little more resistance and impedance mismatch to the line.

Unfortunately, after researching my laptop specs as you suggested, I found that the adapter will not solve the problem.

My laptop is an HP dv6-2300 WH770AV. The specs on the sound ports are not specific. So I experimented with speakers and headphones, using YouTube stereo tests.

As near as I can tell, the sound ports are identical to each other, and are mono (or stereo with such poor separation that they may as well be mono). Both my speakers and my headsets use 1/8" TRS plugs. (Thanks for suggesting that I look up TS, TRS and TRRS. I knew what they were, but not what they were called. And I had assumed that TRS implied stereo, but found out that it could also be mono with a separate ground for a balanced line. I had correctly assumed that there were numerous ways that TRRS would be used -- mics, controls, etc.).

Will an external USB sound card bypass any PC limitations? Which USB sound cards would you recommend? My requirements are as follows:

I want to use the sound for audio RIFE applications (applying specific sound frequency sets directly to parts of the body for healing conditions), and for binaural beat applications (for producing healing states of consciousness).

Ideally, I need a full, fairly flat frequency range as far into the sub-audio as possible. The ability to boost lowest frequencies would be helpful, because they have to vibrate the body through headphone earcups.

(I don't care about surround sound or entertainment applications).

Would an external USB sound card work, and produce full frequency sound and clean stereo separation? Would such a card work just as well with an inexpensive netbook? (I am considering one for portability).

Thanks again for responding so quickly, and and for your thorough help.

David D.





 

Ralston18

Dignified
Moderator
Interesting applications.

Not a USB sound card user but overall the control you need is probably more viable with a PCI-x soundcard with good drivers that permit frequency controls etc..

Even then I am not sure that the normal home sound cards will proved the features and functions you need. You probably need something more like a high end mixer/amplifier(s) used by professional audio people.

You probably should open a new post over in the Home Audio category (Moderators may suggest another category) and list out the Audio RIFE requirements including frequencies, etc. There are some really good audio experts with a wealth of knowledge and experience. Could well be that the laptop's audio output could be amplified, cleaned up, and otherwise modified to meet the levels needed for healing applications.
 

dddiam

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Ralston18, Thank you so much for all of your information and suggestions.
You are kind to have given so much attention to my needs.
Have a great day!

David D.
 
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