Need help deciding what TV to buy, please!

tylergoodwin102710

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Dec 25, 2011
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I'm trying to find a tv that I won't regret buying. I bought the UN50JU7100 because I thought that was a great choice and I can easily return it if there is something better. But, the more I research the more things I find out such as HDR, HDCP, nanocrystal tech. etc. Does anyone know of a TV that is good for gaming and has a great picture with all the bells and whistles such as HDR (not necessarily things like a Smart TV) that I won't regret buying and will be able to take advantage of all the new technologies (HDR, 4K Blu Ray players) and is still great for gaming? (Low lag input etc.) I can't decide what would be the best best that has the future proof tech and is great for gaming.
 
Not true, HDR is coming to market, though as far as content is concerned, only a few sources such as Netflix does HDR on some of their content, and future discs would have to be remade or made to support HDR. With that said, it's too early to buy a TV based on specs that aren't made into standards yet, manufactueres are trying different things, and early adopters will be the beta testers for these companies.

Same thing happend to 3D. Early adopters experienced 3D, but with a 120 Hz refresh rate (with a few high end 240 Hz native refresh rate models with no crosstalk), it showed a lot of crosstalk and flickering, where as today 3D is more common, and if it's a 3D movie, the entire thing is 3D, from start to finish, contrary to what most people believe who are just guessing what it's like.

Now as far as HDR is concerned, TV needs to support HDMI 2.0a, that's not a standard yet either. In my opinion, it's too early to worry about specs just because of the hype behind them. Buying a "4k" TV now, is not future proofing, that's making a bad purchase decision. We need standards, then we'll get the TV's that fully support future specs required for the new UHD content.

I recommend a good FHD TV, unless you're willing to risk getting burned by whatever company you decide to buy your TV from.




All the best!

 

basroil

Honorable
1) No such thing as "HDR" TVs, that's just marketing nonsense. All you should care about is static contrast ratio first, and area backlight based dynamic contrast after that.
2) For 4K you need a 4K TV, and for 60Hz 4K you need HDMI 2.0
3) You should consider a good receiver and speakers, great sound is almost as important as good video, especially for movies and gaming.
4) That TV is great, I have it's predecessors, and not a single issue with any of them (except an old DLP that fried it's own mainboard, but otherwise it was good)

Basically, just get a good speaker system (with proper receiver) and you'll be happy with your choice for years to come.
 
Not true, HDR is coming to market, though as far as content is concerned, only a few sources such as Netflix does HDR on some of their content, and future discs would have to be remade or made to support HDR. With that said, it's too early to buy a TV based on specs that aren't made into standards yet, manufactueres are trying different things, and early adopters will be the beta testers for these companies.

Same thing happend to 3D. Early adopters experienced 3D, but with a 120 Hz refresh rate (with a few high end 240 Hz native refresh rate models with no crosstalk), it showed a lot of crosstalk and flickering, where as today 3D is more common, and if it's a 3D movie, the entire thing is 3D, from start to finish, contrary to what most people believe who are just guessing what it's like.

Now as far as HDR is concerned, TV needs to support HDMI 2.0a, that's not a standard yet either. In my opinion, it's too early to worry about specs just because of the hype behind them. Buying a "4k" TV now, is not future proofing, that's making a bad purchase decision. We need standards, then we'll get the TV's that fully support future specs required for the new UHD content.

I recommend a good FHD TV, unless you're willing to risk getting burned by whatever company you decide to buy your TV from.




All the best!

 

basroil

Honorable


Again, all that is just nonsense made up by TV manufacturers/MPAA. What the TV companies are lying as being HDR is actually what everyone else just calls WIDE GAMUT, something that's been available in high end monitor forever. Basically instead of increasing dynamic range (maximum contrast ratio), you sink more data into making the gradations you can have smaller, and at the same time increase the maximum bounds of the colors you can display (deeper reds, more vibrant greens, etc). Interestingly though, it's actually just a side effect of trying to increase compression efficiency.

That doesn't change the suggestion that all that hype be avoided for now though.
 
That doesn't make any sense. So they are hyping up and spreading misinformation? How is that even allowed?

I thought because older content can be upgraded to HDR due to the equipment used, it shouldn't be difficult. But the impact is pretty big, and they are restricting it to a handful of TV's, when they could do all at no extra cost?
 
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