Nest Recalls Smoke + CO Alarms Due to Faulty Feature

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lp231

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Mar 24, 2006
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Completely remove the wave function and if it's a false alarm, the user have to physically press the button on the device. The NEST logo can act as a button.
 

chugot9218

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Well, I think it is recommended to have a smoke alarm at the highest point in a room, so if you have ever lived in a home with vaulted ceilings and no ladder taller than 5 ft, it's not so easy as simply pushing a button. In fact, try with a dying alarm where you need to replace the battery at that height. Let's just say our solution employed a broom handle, duct tape, and a knife taped to the end lol. Not that magically waving your hands would resolve that situation either, but the point is smoke alarms are not always in easily accessible places.
 

razor512

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Overpriced device especially compared to far more sensitive (programmable limits of the industrial multiwarners which allow you to insert sensor cartridges to detect a range of gases. The nest smoke detector is insanely overpriced.

That flaw that caused the recall was a common joke made about the product when it was first announced. The company completely ignored the concerns and comments about that exact issue of how does it differentiate between someone waving their arm stop the alarm, and someone being burned alive by some fire.
 

velocityg4

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Well, I think it is recommended to have a smoke alarm at the highest point in a room, so if you have ever lived in a home with vaulted ceilings and no ladder taller than 5 ft, it's not so easy as simply pushing a button. In fact, try with a dying alarm where you need to replace the battery at that height. Let's just say our solution employed a broom handle, duct tape, and a knife taped to the end lol. Not that magically waving your hands would resolve that situation either, but the point is smoke alarms are not always in easily accessible places.
Use a hardwired alarm then you rarely have to replace the battery. Also use the First Alert Onelink. Then you just have to silence one alarm to silence them all. They are also much safer since if one goes off they all do. That way even if there is a barely audible alarm in your Kitchen the one above your bed wakes you up and tells you which room the fire or CO is in.

I have them all over the house. Every bedroom, hallway, kitchen, garage and crawlspace. The only downside to the Onelink is for some reason they don't make a dual Ionization and Photoelectric detector for greater sensitivity.
 
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