Possible to generate a 20 KHz audio signal on a PC?

louarnold

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Mar 23, 2009
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I would like to generate an audio signal (sine wave) from 10 KHz to 20 Khz. I have .wav files that will produce output in 1KHz steps to 20Khz, and I'll be using those to feed the sound device. Is it possible to do this with a standard desktop PC?

The sound device is on the motherboard, and I have a set of Logitech, small, amplified speakers, but I'm not sure what the bandwidth is on the PC's sound output to begin with. Does any one know?

 

Pyree

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The sound card should be fine (list your sound card so it can be confirmed). The speaker should also be fine if you don't use something too cheap (list your speaker so it can be confirmed as well).
 

louarnold

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For the "sound card", the audio devices are on the motherboard. When I go to Manage >Device Manager, under Sound, video and game controllers, I get the following:
Audio Codecs
Legacy Audio Drivers
SoundMax Integrated Digital Audio
USB Audio Device
and more items for video.

The speakers are Logitech S-100 and online info says they range from 50 Hz to 20 KHz, but at 20 KHz aren't they much lower in volume?.
 

Pyree

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The sound card is under "Sound, video and game controllers".

Most likely you have got Realtek High Definition Audio. Check it. It will do 200 KHz.

The Logitech S-100, if the spec says it can do 20 KHz, then it probably can, but whether you can hear it is another question. It is true that the speaker don't play high freq as loud (the volume is inconsistent across the frequency range), but more importantly, your ear probably couldn't hear frequency of 20 KHz. You can turn the volume way up and you hear something, but that's not 20 KHz, just static.
 

themenphis

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:non:
;)
Hi.
With a random HD audiocard and your set of speakers is difficult if not impossible to reach 20kHz.
This is a test I made years ago with some soundcards, including an ALC888 that is on pair with the ALC892 the second best integrated SC after the newer 889. How you can see the curve looks like asymptotic near the 20k frequency, while a D2X stays linear. With the integrated you'll have something like -10dB @ 20kHz that must be added at the drop of your cheap full range speakers, that will probably be already too high after 16kHz. You need a decent tweeter for 20Khz. Plus our ears are very insensible at very high and very low frequencies, just watch the "ambient noise A weighting filter" to have an idea of how many dB we miss at the frequency change. http://www.cirrusresearch.co.uk/blog/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/Frequency-Weighting-Curves.jpg



Bye
 

themenphis

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Yes but only the 889 that is the best onboard, all others cannot (except maybe some gigabyte on hi-end motherboards that uses a creative chip). And it tops out at 21kHz, not 200.
Anyway his speakers are the real weak point, so forgot frequencies > 16kHz ;)
 

louarnold

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These were all good answers. Thank you all for your generosity. Sadly my personal situation would not let me continue my hobby, and I simply could not physically get at the computer to tell you. I hope for improvement.

Regards,
Lou.
 
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