Procedure to Root Droid X Revealed

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shloader

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Ya just don't take an OS developed on the ideal of openness and try to lock it down, especially if it's a hot phone like the Droids seem to be. You're just pissing money away on security. Motorola kinda deserved this at least a little.
 

figgus

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It was foolish of Motorola to lock this phone down at Verizon's request, but Verizon gimps ALL their phones (too bad their service is so good around here).

Incidentally, I think this sort of thing is why Google never sullied the Nexus1 by bringing it to Verizon. Big Red probably wanted the OS locked down tight.
 

IFLATLINEI

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Shame on both Verizon and Motorola. Wasting cash. Its been proven time and time again. The hacking community will always find a way. There is nothing these big companies can do to stop it. I dont know why they even bother.
 
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Rooting the phone has NOTHING to do with the EFuse. Come on TH. Do your research.
 
G

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Seems like the author of this post either has no clue or is purposefully engaged in spreading FUD. The eFuse chip in the Droid X was never programed to "brick" the phone; it is there to prevent unsigned ROMs from booting on the phone. If a person decides to load a custom ROM not approved by Motorola - then the phone will keep booting to the recovery console until a signed ROM is restored. "Rooting" the phone on the other hand just enables root access for the underlying Linux OS - it does not change the ROM in anyway. Once a user has root access they can "brick" their phones by deleting necessary files. If and when a the signing requirement is bypassed or cracked - then people will be able to load custom ROMs. This rumor that a rooting of the Droid X results in a bricked phone was started a forum poster that did not have access to the Droid X but went off what a "buddy" of his told him. This buddy supposedly saw phones bricked by rooting and/or custom ROM attempts.
 

cj_online

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wtf? am i the only one who doesn't quite get this? Since when are Android phones so uptight about modding ie thirdparty/open source software... seems a bit hypocritical ...
 

fulle

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Locking down the OS is actually just good business.

Look, I don't know how to put this but... I have a nice setup with my Droid, with a beastly OC, all the bloatware removed, and with many interesting apps that people here would probably find very useful... but when I run into someone on the street, the #1 question about my phone is: "Holy crap! When you move the phone, the lady's breasts giggle! How can I make my phone do that?!" I'm not exaggerating either, the other night I was playing a little pool in the bar, while like 4 girls huddled around my phone taking turns shaking it.

That's the audience they design the devices for. Not us. The "OMG, they wiggle!, I need to buy a Droid now!" idiot general public.
 

shloader

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You say that but you offer no real supporting argument. Good business for who? Their sources of sponsored apps? I'll try and better explain my stance on this. I see the Android OS much along the same lines as I see Ubuntu. I think the two are somewhat comparable, maybe even very comparable. They're open operating systems and were presented to the masses as a stark contrast to closed proprietary systems in existence. If a vendor came along with a netbook sporting very attractive specs but only the vendor's specially tailored version of Ubuntu Netbook would install I would say that vendor's attitude is beyond arrogant if it thought its lockout would not be eventually defeated. Now I understand that this could never happen with Ubuntu because of its community participation where Android is a Google specific development. With that in mind I'm sure Google told vendors like Motorola and HTC that they could lock down their phones. I also understand that leaving things completely open makes the phone manufacturers little more than hardware vendors. However Google didn't just try to market this OS to vendors, they marketed it to us. They had to. Vendors wanted to see Google hype up the end users so selling the phones would be easy. In doing so they heavily emphasized the openness of their OS to the point that locking the phones seems contradictory to their ideals... and I think vendors are very aware of this perception of openness.

So fulle, I understand that the idiotic general public may be the lions share of sales however that doesn't discount Motorola's awareness of the educated consumers, too, else they wouldn't exert near the effort to lock it. And they probably did make a necessary effort to lock the phone to appease Verizon and sponsors, fine, good for business. But they also have to expect that it will be defeated.
 

eddieroolz

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See Motorola, it only took a team of hackers a week or two. Meanwhile all you got was severe backlash from the tech and open-source community for going against the entire premise of open source.
 

Camikazi

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[citation][nom]cj_online[/nom]wtf? am i the only one who doesn't quite get this? Since when are Android phones so uptight about modding ie thirdparty/open source software... seems a bit hypocritical ...[/citation]
Since Verizon got their hands on one, they like to lockdown and control everything that goes on their phones.
 

anamaniac

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[citation][nom]Shloader[/nom]You say that but you offer no real supporting argument. Good business for who? Their sources of sponsored apps? I'll try and better explain my stance on this. I see the Android OS much along the same lines as I see Ubuntu. I think the two are somewhat comparable, maybe even very comparable. They're open operating systems and were presented to the masses as a stark contrast to closed proprietary systems in existence. If a vendor came along with a netbook sporting very attractive specs but only the vendor's specially tailored version of Ubuntu Netbook would install I would say that vendor's attitude is beyond arrogant if it thought its lockout would not be eventually defeated. Now I understand that this could never happen with Ubuntu because of its community participation where Android is a Google specific development. With that in mind I'm sure Google told vendors like Motorola and HTC that they could lock down their phones. I also understand that leaving things completely open makes the phone manufacturers little more than hardware vendors. However Google didn't just try to market this OS to vendors, they marketed it to us. They had to. Vendors wanted to see Google hype up the end users so selling the phones would be easy. In doing so they heavily emphasized the openness of their OS to the point that locking the phones seems contradictory to their ideals... and I think vendors are very aware of this perception of openness. So fulle, I understand that the idiotic general public may be the lions share of sales however that doesn't discount Motorola's awareness of the educated consumers, too, else they wouldn't exert near the effort to lock it. And they probably did make a necessary effort to lock the phone to appease Verizon and sponsors, fine, good for business. But they also have to expect that it will be defeated.[/citation]
Freedom and openness may be a pipe dream in reality, but it's a dream worth fighting for.
Sure, the bulk of consumers aren't affected, but guess what, many still are.
It was like me buying a PSPgo at release thinking they'd crack it in a week. The thing is useless without custom firmware. :(

I intend to buy a phone straight up cash and unlocked. I damn well better have the thing fully unlocked, or I'm sticking with my dumbphone that tells time and makes calls.
 
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