Simplocker is Android's First Crypto-Ransomware

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wemakeourfuture

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If this was Apple there would be 100 comments by now.
But since its Android its crickets on here.

There's no question when it comes to security, updates, customer support and service Android devices are struggling.
 

DarkSable

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If this was Apple there would be 100 comments by now.
But since its Android its crickets on here.

There's no question when it comes to security, updates, customer support and service Android devices are struggling.
How did you not notice that this is the FIRST ransomware that's been detected on Android? iOS has had several of them now.

On top of that, this one requires a user error so large as to download a "media player" to watch porn on. If that doesn't scream virus, I don't know what does.

Android gets regular updates, and has decent security; it's on par with iOS there. When it comes to customer support and service, that's supplied by the companies that sell the phones - and it varies wildly, compared to the single company that sells iphones.

What it comes down to is if you're enough of a techie that your phone doesn't have to protect itself from the user, get an Android. If you don't know what you're doing and want a very simple phone that just does things, buy an Apple.
 

ericburnby

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How did you not notice that this is the FIRST ransomware that's been detected on Android? iOS has had several of them now.

On top of that, this one requires a user error so large as to download a "media player" to watch porn on. If that doesn't scream virus, I don't know what does.

Android gets regular updates, and has decent security; it's on par with iOS there. When it comes to customer support and service, that's supplied by the companies that sell the phones - and it varies wildly, compared to the single company that sells iphones.

What it comes down to is if you're enough of a techie that your phone doesn't have to protect itself from the user, get an Android. If you don't know what you're doing and want a very simple phone that just does things, buy an Apple.
Wrong. It clearly states in the article that there have been several other attempts at this on Android. This is the first one that can actually encrypt data.

And the iOS ones you're talking about weren't exploits of iOS itself, they were people stupid enough to use the same Apple ID/password on other sites, so that when those sites got hacked they had you ID so they could lock your phone. There's no evidence at all that iOS itself was hacked for those attacks.

Android does not get regular updates. Google Play Services does, but it's not capable of patching all exploits in Android since it's limited in what it has access to. Any low-level security issues still need the actual OS to be patched, which can take time.

BTW, iOS is FIPS 140-2 certified. Android is not. Tell me again why Android is "on par" with iOS when it doesn't carry the same security certification that iOS does? There's a reason why iOS completely dominates Android in Enterprise/Corporate usage despite having a supposedly "small market share".
 

John Wittenberg

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I've used both IOS (first with the 3GS) and have since gone to Android. I prefer Android because I simply have more options to do what I want to do with it.

If I didn't, I would still be rocking IOS. I suspect most (not all!) others out there are of a similar mindset on both sides of the isle.

TLDR, who cares? They both work.
 

ferooxidan

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How did you not notice that this is the FIRST ransomware that's been detected on Android? iOS has had several of them now.

On top of that, this one requires a user error so large as to download a "media player" to watch porn on. If that doesn't scream virus, I don't know what does.

Android gets regular updates, and has decent security; it's on par with iOS there. When it comes to customer support and service, that's supplied by the companies that sell the phones - and it varies wildly, compared to the single company that sells iphones.

What it comes down to is if you're enough of a techie that your phone doesn't have to protect itself from the user, get an Android. If you don't know what you're doing and want a very simple phone that just does things, buy an Apple.
Wrong. It clearly states in the article that there have been several other attempts at this on Android. This is the first one that can actually encrypt data.

And the iOS ones you're talking about weren't exploits of iOS itself, they were people stupid enough to use the same Apple ID/password on other sites, so that when those sites got hacked they had you ID so they could lock your phone. There's no evidence at all that iOS itself was hacked for those attacks.

Android does not get regular updates. Google Play Services does, but it's not capable of patching all exploits in Android since it's limited in what it has access to. Any low-level security issues still need the actual OS to be patched, which can take time.

BTW, iOS is FIPS 140-2 certified. Android is not. Tell me again why Android is "on par" with iOS when it doesn't carry the same security certification that iOS does? There's a reason why iOS completely dominates Android in Enterprise/Corporate usage despite having a supposedly "small market share".
From the fact, and Tom's article stating that so many iPhone users already became victim of ransomware and Android just got it "first"? even this "first" can be blocked just by not downloading anything except from Google playstore while iPhone got locked because the cracker crack Apple cloud service and locked user phone. Android: got locked by downloading suspicious software out there, user fault; iPhone: got locked because hacker hack into Apple server while the user doing nothing, FIPS 140-2 certified.
 

jrob801

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Jun 10, 2014
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How did you not notice that this is the FIRST ransomware that's been detected on Android? iOS has had several of them now.

On top of that, this one requires a user error so large as to download a "media player" to watch porn on. If that doesn't scream virus, I don't know what does.

Android gets regular updates, and has decent security; it's on par with iOS there. When it comes to customer support and service, that's supplied by the companies that sell the phones - and it varies wildly, compared to the single company that sells iphones.

What it comes down to is if you're enough of a techie that your phone doesn't have to protect itself from the user, get an Android. If you don't know what you're doing and want a very simple phone that just does things, buy an Apple.
Wrong. It clearly states in the article that there have been several other attempts at this on Android. This is the first one that can actually encrypt data.

And the iOS ones you're talking about weren't exploits of iOS itself, they were people stupid enough to use the same Apple ID/password on other sites, so that when those sites got hacked they had you ID so they could lock your phone. There's no evidence at all that iOS itself was hacked for those attacks.

Android does not get regular updates. Google Play Services does, but it's not capable of patching all exploits in Android since it's limited in what it has access to. Any low-level security issues still need the actual OS to be patched, which can take time.

BTW, iOS is FIPS 140-2 certified. Android is not. Tell me again why Android is "on par" with iOS when it doesn't carry the same security certification that iOS does? There's a reason why iOS completely dominates Android in Enterprise/Corporate usage despite having a supposedly "small market share".

IOS has recently been exploited both through iCloud AND through the Find My iPhone app. Apple has stated the two are unrelated (IE at least one of them is not a simple password hack).

The Android ransomware hack requires a user to be looking at either porn or warez (both of which are areas where anyone with half an ounce of sense is totally on alert) AND requires you to install a 3rd party application.

You tell me which is scarier, knowing your phone can be hacked through factory installed software, or through a set of steps that requires you to be totally idiotic at at least 3 different points?
 
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