Software for Detecting Pauses or Continuous

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On most albums I have, some songs merge into one another and some have
pauses between them. When I burn these albums there are pauses between
some tracks when I do not want there to be, whereas some of the tracks
require pauses between them. Is there any software available which will
automatically detect if there is silence or not between tracks before I
burn an album, as listening to and logging which songs have pauses and
which have not is a slow process. I use Nero 6.0 for burning.

Thank You
 
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In article <1112736191.685583.304150@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com>,
leepeach <leepeche@hotmail.com> wrote:

>On most albums I have, some songs merge into one another and some have
>pauses between them. When I burn these albums there are pauses between
>some tracks when I do not want there to be, whereas some of the tracks
>require pauses between them. Is there any software available which will
>automatically detect if there is silence or not between tracks before I
>burn an album, as listening to and logging which songs have pauses and
>which have not is a slow process. I use Nero 6.0 for burning.

If Nero is inserting 2-second pauses between each pair of tracks, it's
a strong indication that you have selected "track at once" burning mode.

When transcribing LPs, or other sources with songs that sometimes
run together, it is preferable to use "disc at once" mode, which
can burn an entire album in a single operation without inserting any
gaps.

When I do this, I use Linux-based software called GCDMaster. This
is a GUI which can show the entire album's waveform structure in
a window. It's easy to pick out the transitions between tracks
that have gaps, zoom in, and set an inter-track marker. It's
also a quick operation to find the points at which one track
merges into another without a pause (click and drag, zoom in, play,
scroll, zoom in further, etc.). GCDMaster write a disc-at-once
"table of contents" file which is then passed to the Linux "cdrdao"
program for burning.

The resulting CDs have the same timing and structure as the original
LPs.

--
Dave Platt <dplatt@radagast.org> AE6EO
Hosting the Jade Warrior home page: http://www.radagast.org/jade-warrior
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On Tue, 05 Apr 2005 21:33:48 -0000, dplatt@radagast.org (Dave Platt)
wrote:

>When transcribing LPs, or other sources with songs that sometimes
>run together, it is preferable to use "disc at once" mode, which
>can burn an entire album in a single operation without inserting any
>gaps.

IMHO, disc-at-once is always preferable. Doing that you always
control the track spacing with lengths of silence in the .wav file(s)
- if it's one file, it will play from the hard disk just as it will
play on a CD player.

>When I do this, I use Linux-based software called GCDMaster. This

There's a wonderful shareware Windows app at cdwave.com that allows
you to put track marks in a long .wav file and either save as a .cue
file (what I do, and burn it with the program at goldenhawk.com), or
save as a set of .wav files with lengths in increments of 1/72th of a
second so they write to disc with no gaps inbetween.

>is a GUI which can show the entire album's waveform structure in
>a window. It's easy to pick out the transitions between tracks
>that have gaps, zoom in, and set an inter-track marker. It's
>also a quick operation to find the points at which one track
>merges into another without a pause (click and drag, zoom in, play,
>scroll, zoom in further, etc.). GCDMaster write a disc-at-once
>"table of contents" file which is then passed to the Linux "cdrdao"
>program for burning.
>
>The resulting CDs have the same timing and structure as the original
>LPs.

-----
http://mindspring.com/~benbradley
 

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