The Google Nexus One Review

Status
Not open for further replies.

hellwig

Distinguished
May 29, 2008
817
0
18,930
2
It also has the feel of a beta project; not entirely finished, but out in the world getting admired and gathering buzz.
It is a Google branded product after all. I mean, how many Google products have ever made it out of Beta? Google Mail? Google Maps? I'm sure they still consider Android a beta product.

Still, this Nexus One is making my G1/Dream look slower ever day.
 

Tomsguiderachel

Distinguished
May 16, 2008
665
0
18,930
0
[citation][nom]hellwig[/nom]It is a Google branded product after all. I mean, how many Google products have ever made it out of Beta? Google Mail? Google Maps? I'm sure they still consider Android a beta product.Still, this Nexus One is making my G1/Dream look slower ever day.[/citation]
The only difference is: Google is charging money for this "beta" while almost everything else beta is FREE, right?
 

quantumrand

Distinguished
Feb 12, 2009
160
0
18,630
0
I'm not sure I particularly like this review. It really seems like the reviewer put his iPhone on a shelf for a day while he tried the Nexus One.

Personally, I think the Nexus One blows the iPhone out of the water. The camera is noticeably better, application switching is faster, and general functioning is smoother.

Points like saying typing is slower because the keyboard isn't the same as the iPhone just screams bias. I think thpe Android keyboard's method of autocorrecting your text while also giving you similar options to choose from is FAR better than the iPhone's forcing you to type what it thinks you want to type.

And what's with all this talking about no video support? The Nexus One supports H.263, H.264 and MPEG-4 natively.
 

mactruck

Distinguished
Mar 25, 2009
34
0
18,580
0
[citation][nom]Tomsguiderachel[/nom]The only difference is: Google is charging money for this "beta" while almost everything else beta is FREE, right?[/citation]

You're paying for the hardware, and you didn't even take advantage of all the free software. No mention of the free turn-by-turn navigation?

In the end, I'll stick with my Moto Droid. The killer app that made my iphone-toting buddies drool when we road-tripped 1000 miles this Winter was the Verizon network. I lost 3G signal for maybe 20 minutes total over 2 days of driving.
 

Tomsguiderachel

Distinguished
May 16, 2008
665
0
18,930
0
[citation][nom]quantumrand[/nom]I'm not sure I particularly like this review. It really seems like the reviewer put his iPhone on a shelf for a day while he tried the Nexus One.Personally, I think the Nexus One blows the iPhone out of the water. The camera is noticeably better, application switching is faster, and general functioning is smoother.Points like saying typing is slower because the keyboard isn't the same as the iPhone just screams bias. I think thpe Android keyboard's method of autocorrecting your text while also giving you similar options to choose from is FAR better than the iPhone's forcing you to type what it thinks you want to type.And what's with all this talking about no video support? The Nexus One supports H.263, H.264 and MPEG-4 natively.[/citation]
We'll fact check the video support issues.
I hear you about the iPhone, but the writer has been pretty honest that he is an iPhone user. There's no reason for us not to tell you what products we use personally--in fact, wouldn't you prefer to know? We aren't hiding anything. In our internal testing, iPhone ranks higher than Nexus One in many ways (though not all ways if you read the review). Those are our results, and we're sticking to them. Happy as always to discuss our methodology and view points, and thanks for the comment.
 

jamezrp

Distinguished
Feb 6, 2009
104
0
18,630
0
[citation][nom]quantumrand[/nom]I'm not sure I particularly like this review. It really seems like the reviewer put his iPhone on a shelf for a day while he tried the Nexus One.Personally, I think the Nexus One blows the iPhone out of the water. The camera is noticeably better, application switching is faster, and general functioning is smoother.Points like saying typing is slower because the keyboard isn't the same as the iPhone just screams bias. I think thpe Android keyboard's method of autocorrecting your text while also giving you similar options to choose from is FAR better than the iPhone's forcing you to type what it thinks you want to type.And what's with all this talking about no video support? The Nexus One supports H.263, H.264 and MPEG-4 natively.[/citation]

Quantumrand, while the Nexus One supports those video files for playback, it does not really support video playback at all, rather leaving the option up to 3rd party software developers. Video playback is limited by screen resolution and, as you pointed out, it does not support many different video formats. Ultimately, Google did not build the device with video in mind, and most users will find this true. Compare that to other phones like the Nokia N900 or the iPhone, and you'll see that the Nexus One is not built for video.

It should be, but why it isn't is a question for Google and HTC.

As for commenting on the iPhone, I don't particularly like the iPhone, but I put up with it. I found the N900 to be a phone more suited for myself, so I'm not partial to Apple's device. I do own it and use it, however, and it is today's de-facto standard, so whether any of us likes it, that's what we'll compare it to. There are also plenty of comparisons to different models, including the Palm Pre and Samsung Impression.

Likewise, concerning the keyboard, many find the iPhone keyboard weak until they've become accustomed to it. While this should hold true for all virtual keyboards, the physical ramifications of the glass on the Nexus One have made it difficult to type on properly. As noted, there are other keyboards that can replace the standard Android design from 3rd party developers, but at this point we believe most users will not simply change keyboard designs, as it's more work than it's worth.

Concerning the camera, the Nexus One offers a decent camera as described, which offers better quality than the 3GS, but not the iPhone 3G (quality on the 3GS dropped to make room for the touch-based autofocus). Other phones, like several of Nokia's devices including the N900 and N97, as well as the Palm Pre, give excellent quality images. The Nexus One is good, but there's clearly room for growth. The average user will find the camera good, though power users will find that it isn't great.
 
G

Guest

Guest
I for one am glad and thankful for the review. I love my G1 but it is slow. I love the open source and I really like that I can toggle my internet to my computer with a USB cord.

Being able to download a file to my phone (via USB cable) and then email it using Astro is also beautiful. These benefits make Android the best as I see things. It's open source attitude means it will continue to improve as well.

Too bad for the "flaws" of the Nexus One as described in this review but 3rd place aint bad.

I think I'm gonna upgrade. It seems to be the most versatile phone out there and a "Jack of all trades" that is not perfect in any one aspect but can truly do it all. The IPhone is very limited in this regard as I see it but is a true work of art. And I wish the IPhone were as versatile and not with AT&T or I would definitely get it. Did I say what a work of art it is?

Cheers
 

Tomsguiderachel

Distinguished
May 16, 2008
665
0
18,930
0
[citation][nom]John LeBaron[/nom]I for one am glad and thankful for the review. I love my G1 but it is slow. I love the open source and I really like that I can toggle my internet to my computer with a USB cord.Being able to download a file to my phone (via USB cable) and then email it using Astro is also beautiful. These benefits make Android the best as I see things. It's open source attitude means it will continue to improve as well.Too bad for the "flaws" of the Nexus One as described in this review but 3rd place aint bad.I think I'm gonna upgrade. It seems to be the most versatile phone out there and a "Jack of all trades" that is not perfect in any one aspect but can truly do it all. The IPhone is very limited in this regard as I see it but is a true work of art. And I wish the IPhone were as versatile and not with AT&T or I would definitely get it. Did I say what a work of art it is?Cheers[/citation]
Very sensible response for your particular priorities!
 
G

Guest

Guest
With the Ipad at 500 ... the Nexus should be priced around 300 unlocked and 100 through T Mobile.. then people will adopt it even with the flaws.

The G1 had its issues when it came out, three months later it did more than what a 3GS does now. Sticking with my G1 for now until Google finds a more reasonable marketing strategy.

Too bad T Mobile is still sitting on old HTC models and does not do a thing to bring something useful to the Table.

If T Mobile doesnt get its act together in terms of coverage and service, it will keep on bleeding.

I have very few problems with T Mobile, but dropped calls in 2010 have been a big issue. There were very few in 2009.
 

Tomsguiderachel

Distinguished
May 16, 2008
665
0
18,930
0
[citation][nom]coonday[/nom]This is the nerdiest comment section I've ever seen. Sooo many paragraphs.[/citation]
Then you haven't seen ____[fill in the blank, dozens of super nerdy forums on the Web] :)
 

reuthermonkey

Distinguished
Jan 28, 2010
2
0
18,510
0
[citation][nom]jamezrp[/nom]Quantumrand, while the Nexus One supports those video files for playback, it does not really support video playback at all, rather leaving the option up to 3rd party software developers. Video playback is limited by screen resolution and, as you pointed out, it does not support many different video formats. Ultimately, Google did not build the device with video in mind, and most users will find this true. Compare that to other phones like the Nokia N900 or the iPhone, and you'll see that the Nexus One is not built for video.It should be, but why it isn't is a question for Google and HTC.As for commenting on the iPhone, I don't particularly like the iPhone, but I put up with it. I found the N900 to be a phone more suited for myself, so I'm not partial to Apple's device. I do own it and use it, however, and it is today's de-facto standard, so whether any of us likes it, that's what we'll compare it to. There are also plenty of comparisons to different models, including the Palm Pre and Samsung Impression. Likewise, concerning the keyboard, many find the iPhone keyboard weak until they've become accustomed to it. While this should hold true for all virtual keyboards, the physical ramifications of the glass on the Nexus One have made it difficult to type on properly. As noted, there are other keyboards that can replace the standard Android design from 3rd party developers, but at this point we believe most users will not simply change keyboard designs, as it's more work than it's worth.Concerning the camera, the Nexus One offers a decent camera as described, which offers better quality than the 3GS, but not the iPhone 3G (quality on the 3GS dropped to make room for the touch-based autofocus). Other phones, like several of Nokia's devices including the N900 and N97, as well as the Palm Pre, give excellent quality images. The Nexus One is good, but there's clearly room for growth. The average user will find the camera good, though power users will find that it isn't great.[/citation]
Excuse me, but how does the iPhone which requires transcoding to a single video format (mpeg4), "support" video better than the NexusOne which supports H.263, H.264, and MP4? All of the videos are displayed in the gallery. That's how Android organizes it. An unbiased observer would note this. In fact, I have yet to see ANY review other than this one claim that it doesn't "support" video. If it didn't support video, how on earth would you watch the 720x480 videos that it records???

I concur with Quantumrand. What a biased, small-minded review you've posted here. I own both an iPhone and an Android phone, and the "points" you've made against the NexusOne's Android core scream are downright baffling.

http://www.apple.com/iphone/specs.html
http://www.google.com/phone/static/en_US-nexusone_tech_specs.html

What a sad, pathetic review.
 

jamezrp

Distinguished
Feb 6, 2009
104
0
18,630
0
Reuthermonkey, having video support and supporting video are two very different things. Google clearly has video support, but unlike other phones like the iPhone, it isn't video-centric in the slightest. Meanwhile, users have access to literally thousands of downloadable videos through iTunes or podcasts, etc. Sure, you can do the same with Android devices like the Nexus One, but it's not nearly as simple. That simplicity is key, especially for users interested in switching devices.

As someone who owns both an iPhone and Android device, you must appreciate the differences. Having tested many devices, I can safely say that Android, in it's current state, is not on par with competing mobile operating systems, including OS's from Palm and Nokia. That's a huge fault, especially considering that Google is adapting their OS so much faster than everyone else, but right now it is not the best, or even second best.

However, I have no doubt in my mind that this will change within the next year or so, should Google continue researching as they have in the past.
 

reuthermonkey

Distinguished
Jan 28, 2010
2
0
18,510
0
[citation][nom]jamezrp[/nom]Reuthermonkey, having video support and supporting video are two very different things. Google clearly has video support, but unlike other phones like the iPhone, it isn't video-centric in the slightest. Meanwhile, users have access to literally thousands of downloadable videos through iTunes or podcasts, etc. Sure, you can do the same with Android devices like the Nexus One, but it's not nearly as simple. That simplicity is key, especially for users interested in switching devices.[/citation]
That's not what was said in the review - not in the least. You said "the handset does not actively support video playback". To any (again, unbiased) reader, this implies that the handset is incapable of showing video. It clearly is. I would advise you to rephrase it to say "It doesn't have iTunes, so it's not as good as my JesusPhone".
[citation][nom]jamezrp[/nom]
As someone who owns both an iPhone and Android device, you must appreciate the differences. Having tested many devices, I can safely say that Android, in it's current state, is not on par with competing mobile operating systems, including OS's from Palm and Nokia. That's a huge fault, especially considering that Google is adapting their OS so much faster than everyone else, but right now it is not the best, or even second best. However, I have no doubt in my mind that this will change within the next year or so, should Google continue researching as they have in the past.[/citation]You've made the claim multiple times that "it's not on par" with WebOS, Symbian, or iPhone. Ironically, it's userbase is growing at an exponential rate - at the very expense of Palm, Nokia, and Apple. When the G1 and MyTouch were the only Android phones, this was not the case. From Android 1.5 to 2.1, it has evolved from a gadget-owners toy to a mainstream, stable OS. Either you need to back up your claims with some substance. If your substance is simply that you disagree with Google's choice to make its handset one-handed friendly (by not implementing multi-touch features that require the phone to be held with two hands), then say so, and we can argue that point. I personally agree with this design choice. I prefer not to be forced to use two hands to use my phone when one could suffice. That's why Google prefers trackballs instead of D-pads for one-handed phone navigation.

And that's why I believe that this review is deeply biased. Rather than spending the time with the device and just learning WHY Google chose to go a different way on certain design choices, your mind is quite clearly locked in the iPhone mindset and refuses to even be open to alternatives.

I appreciate my iPhone for some things (ie just browsing the web, playing with new apps), but my day-to-day phone is my Android phone because I spent time with it and figured out that when I'm driving down the road and need to zoom in on a google map, it's 10x easier to press a virtual button, or scroll around using a trackball than it is to try zooming in on my iphone one-handed.
 

Tomsguiderachel

Distinguished
May 16, 2008
665
0
18,930
0
Hi Reuthermonkey,

I just wanted to step and and thank you for your very thoughtful comments. You back up every point you make clearly and logically. These are exactly the kind of comments we want to see here. I would merely add that simply because a technology reviewer ended up with a different opinion than you did, does not automatically make that reviewer biased, or pathetic. Those are somewhat mean-spirited charges and accusations. I believe there is room for more than one opinion on a device--and it is hard to read this review and truly call it anti-Nexus One. It isn't. It is merely critical. Nowhere in this review did the writer imply that the Nexus One is incapable of playing video, he simply believes the way it does so isn't as intuitive as the iPhone. Perhaps the word "support" was not the most descriptive of his actual complaint, but using that word does not make the writer by default incorrect. Thank you for reading.

Rachel Rosmarin, Editor of Tom's Guide
 

jamezrp

Distinguished
Feb 6, 2009
104
0
18,630
0
Android's growth and the quality of the product are not mutually exclusive. Service operators, price, and hardware have more effect than any other factor when considering purchasing a phone for most consumers.

That said, I never said Symbian is better, and in fact cannot stand Symbian when it comes to touch-based devices (in case you haven't seen our N97 review). WebOS is clearly very clean, as is iPhoneOS. Nokia's use of Maemo, the Linux-based OS, is exceptional, though the N900 is not specifically a phone (Nokia claims it's a tablet).

As for Android and the phones it's on, it has several key marketable features, namely that it's a Google-supported device. Consumers see Google and immediately think of their email, calendars, etc., and easy usability for online tools. It's also offered a very fast-growing userbase, but not from RIM (Blackberry) or iPhone users, but rather from Nokia (Symbian-based), Windows Mobile and Palm users.

Indeed, Android is stable, but it's also not a finished product, and that shows with each new firmware update and each new phone. I don't know any consumer willing to buy each new device simply for the new firmware update. You don't need to use two hands to use the iPhone, all functions work one-handed as well (though this is obviously not as accurate).

As an iPhone user who doesn't like the iPhone, I can't say I'm biased, but that's a judgment call for readers. However, why Google chose not to do what 75 million iPhone/iPod Touch users have shown a liking for cannot mean that they are right in their direction. I personally believe that Google doesn't believe in releasing half-assed products, but they do believe in releasing unfinished products, so full multi-touch capabilities will come in the future. When it's done and ready. And right now, it's not done and ready.

Palm did it, and they did it well. 3rd party developers on Android are getting closer to making it right, but they're still not there. Apple has had it for nearly 3 years now.

I do agree with you that D-Pads are stupid in this day and age, but trackballs should go just the same. It's useful in Android, but realistically it shouldn't be. The fact that other phones get away without UI buttons (not including a keyboard) means that an Android device with such UI buttons is lacking in some way. In the case of the Nexus One, it's selecting specific portions of text, which it does better, but still not great.
 
G

Guest

Guest
Reuthermonkey, I agree with you 100%. If this review is not considered biased, I don't know what is.

In the article, features that are better than the iPhone are followed by a negative comment.

"The process is done through a cell or Wi-Fi network, so users on a poor connection will not be able to transcribe speech" Well I guess we could say iPhone app store has millions of app "but users on a poor connection will not be able to buy them", or "Maps on iphone will be jerky for users on a poor connection"

"we were able to both download and stream Youtube clips (streaming opens the Youtube application), though streaming video quality does not match that of the AMOLED display" Is this just another negative way to say the AMOLED display is brilliant ?

"On the phone, the Nexus One sounds clear and crisp, in part due to a dual-microphone (one in the back to monitor background noise). Voices through the receiver sounded tinny, but clear."
So having the 2nd mic for noise reduction to cut down the background noise (which I've heard lot of reviews for superior voice quality) and the result for the reviewer is "tinny".

"MPEG-4 videos can be played on the Nexus One, though the handset does not actively support video playback" The most confusing statement. So it plays mpeg4 or it doesn't? Does it mean that I cannot transfer a mp4 video on the phone and play it?
 

jamezrp

Distinguished
Feb 6, 2009
104
0
18,630
0
Skyline, some of the comments you made have been addressed in the comments, so I suggest you read above.

Voice transcription is not done on the device itself, which is a hindrance. Obviously, the future of cellphone technology should make phones connected at all times, but sadly that is not the case today. That said, AT&T's data plan is currently listed at the top according to a recent study by Gizmodo, and their coverage has improved exceptionally over the last few years. That said, Verizon's model of the Nexus One will be much more reliable than the T-Mobile model in terms of phone calls and data connections.

The AMOLED screen is brilliant, though sadly underused. Streaming video content is not suitable for testing the screen quality because the quality of streaming video is generally poor. Watchable, but poor nonetheless.

Outgoing sound, the audio someone hears on the other line, is good. Incoming sound, which the Nexus One user hears, is tinny.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Thread starter Similar threads Forum Replies Date
valentinalucia Streaming Video & TVs 4
PhilipMichaels Streaming Video & TVs 1
Marshall Honorof Streaming Video & TVs 1
JMcEntegart Streaming Video & TVs 9
Z Streaming Video & TVs 8
JMcEntegart Streaming Video & TVs 7
exfileme Streaming Video & TVs 2
Z Streaming Video & TVs 10
Z Streaming Video & TVs 13
dconnors Streaming Video & TVs 4
exfileme Streaming Video & TVs 13
exfileme Streaming Video & TVs 10
exfileme Streaming Video & TVs 43
G Streaming Video & TVs 22
exfileme Streaming Video & TVs 19
exfileme Streaming Video & TVs 20
exfileme Streaming Video & TVs 41
exfileme Streaming Video & TVs 8
JMcEntegart Streaming Video & TVs 6
JMcEntegart Streaming Video & TVs 17

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS