VIDEO: George Takei Blown Away by 4-color TV

Status
Not open for further replies.

daglesj

Distinguished
Jul 14, 2007
82
0
18,580
0
Worth checking out. I'm still using my Sharp Perfect PAL 32" LCD from about 5 years ago.

It has a 960x540 screen that fits a PAL SD signal and half downscales a 1080 signal perfectly. Looks really good actually. Many folks have remarked on the very smooth picture quality.

I wont be getting HD services for a while so no biggie.
 

dman3k

Distinguished
Apr 28, 2009
385
0
18,930
0
RGBY and 3D? I'm game. I just hope Vizio can offer it and take the prices down. (I may make a lot of money, but I don't intend on wasting it.)
 

rockola

Distinguished
Feb 26, 2010
18
0
18,560
0
I'm strangely reminded of ex Arizona governor Evan Mecham's crack about Japanese businessmen getting "round eyes" when they saw how many golf courses the state has.
 

shin0bi272

Distinguished
Nov 20, 2007
271
0
18,930
0
Ive seen this commercial a few times but I still dont get it. I was told that with RGB, tint, and hue you could create over 16 million colors... youre telling me yellow isnt one of them? Why is this new pixel needed?
 

Tindytim

Distinguished
Sep 16, 2008
506
0
18,930
0
I call bull.

R + G = Y

Even if this did somehow increase the color gamut of the display, it doesn't change the fact that there still isn't content out there that would actually take advantage of said color space.
 
G

Guest

Guest
It's a gimmick. R and G make Y; there's no need for a yellow pixel. The human eye has rods and cones. The cones are color sensitive with 3 types: red, green, blue. That's why we use R, G, and B pixels to represent all of the colors. The human eyes and brain absolutely can not tell the difference between yellow light and the appropriate mix of red and green light. You need a spectrometer for that. See http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/vision/rodcone.html
 

PostmanPat

Distinguished
Jan 5, 2010
10
0
18,560
0
[citation][nom]maxh2[/nom]It's a gimmick. R and G make Y...[/citation]

I agree in principal, but I believe the issue is that the red and green that the current LCDs produce is not a perfect red and green, so when you add them you get a poor yellow. This new tech is just taking some of the error out of producing yellows by producing it directly. Its not that different from laserjet technology where the good printers use 6 or more colored inks because the mixing of just 3 always creates imperfect results.
 

Judguh

Distinguished
Jan 27, 2009
24
0
18,560
0
[citation][nom]Tindytim[/nom]I call bull.R + G = YEven if this did somehow increase the color gamut of the display, it doesn't change the fact that there still isn't content out there that would actually take advantage of said color space.[/citation]

Red and Green do NOT make Yellow. Red Blue and Yellow are the THREE primary colors - just not that TV's and Monitors use (standard ones besides this one)

As for Sharp's TV - that looks pretty sweet, hope it turns out to be an awesome product!
 

mitch074

Distinguished
Mar 17, 2006
139
0
18,630
0
I would say there could be two things.

Current flat panels don't handle color levels finely enough, and since the eye is very sensitive to yellow (it's flat in the middle of the rainbow, meaning the center of the spectrum our eye can discern), this lack of fine setting can be seen - adding a 'yellow' channel may just allow the screen to output more precise yellow levels, making the image look more contrasted. That wasn't the case with CRTs, due to the much more precise levels an electron beam could be set at.

Actually, right now the information carried by high definition streams allows the reproduction of colors that the eye can't really see well - so, with proper filters, it should be possible to have images that actually benefit from this process.


The second thing would be (it can actually combine with the first point) that it would allow a better interpolation on the subpixel level: while square pixels require three side-by-side very rectangular subchannels, adding a fourth one may actually allow for a square subpixel grid. Now, any of the three primary complimentary colors could have fit the bill: magenta or cyan. However, magenta is at the lower end of the preceptible color spectrum, and cyan at the higher end. Yellow is flush in the middle. So, back to point one.

It is a good idea. However, the reason why I'd never get one of those screens is because, well, subpixel font rendering would be screwed up by a non-RGB grid...

Don't let that fool you though, one reason for the gig is that, seeing the screen from the side allows us to see how thin the screen actually is...
 

Tindytim

Distinguished
Sep 16, 2008
506
0
18,930
0
[citation][nom]Judguh[/nom]Red and Green do NOT make Yellow. Red Blue and Yellow are the THREE primary colors - just not that TV's and Monitors use (standard ones besides this one)As for Sharp's TV - that looks pretty sweet, hope it turns out to be an awesome product![/citation]

Actually those are artistic primary colors. Red Green and Blue are the primary colors of light, and Cyan, Magenta, and Yellow are the primary colors of pigment (which is why those are the colors in your color printer cartridge). Might want to do some reading on the subject:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Primary_color
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Thread starter Similar threads Forum Replies Date
T Streaming Video & TVs 3
F Streaming Video & TVs 0
SophiaRichards Streaming Video & TVs 1
abully Streaming Video & TVs 1
R Streaming Video & TVs 0
S Streaming Video & TVs 2
rad07 Streaming Video & TVs 2
shaines Streaming Video & TVs 23
Pdbonlucas Streaming Video & TVs 3
Mordko Streaming Video & TVs 18
KatTech Streaming Video & TVs 3
T Streaming Video & TVs 8
AlanA76 Streaming Video & TVs 6
A Streaming Video & TVs 1
Sohaib AJ Streaming Video & TVs 1
rwcass75 Streaming Video & TVs 5
J Streaming Video & TVs 2
GregIvins Streaming Video & TVs 4
Tacomama Streaming Video & TVs 3
I Streaming Video & TVs 0

ASK THE COMMUNITY