what's the trick - sunshine

GT

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Got my EOS 350d a few months back and took it on holiday to a sunny place
and all bright sunshine shots are over exposed by at least 2 stops!
Obviously I compensated at the time by turning down the exposure by 2 stops,
but why do I need to do this. I chose Sunshine for the white balance and was
using ISO 100 or 200.

All shots were RAW, so I can adjust them on the PC, but you can only adjust
so far from the original!

The only way I could get decent pics was to use the full manual mode
(normally prefer P for holiday snaps) and play around with the aperture and
shutter speed to below -2 stops, which takes far too long for holiday snaps
at the zoo and around the campsite.

What am I doing wrong?

How do I use the custom white balance setting. I have read the manual, but
can't get anywhere!
 
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"GT" <ContactGT_remove_@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:42c93b67$0$3348$9a6e19ea@unlimited.newshosting.com...
> Got my EOS 350d a few months back and took it on holiday to a sunny place
> and all bright sunshine shots are over exposed by at least 2 stops!
> Obviously I compensated at the time by turning down the exposure by 2
> stops, but why do I need to do this. I chose Sunshine for the white
> balance and was using ISO 100 or 200.
>
> All shots were RAW, so I can adjust them on the PC, but you can only
> adjust so far from the original!
>
> The only way I could get decent pics was to use the full manual mode
> (normally prefer P for holiday snaps) and play around with the aperture
> and shutter speed to below -2 stops, which takes far too long for holiday
> snaps at the zoo and around the campsite.
>
> What am I doing wrong?
>
> How do I use the custom white balance setting. I have read the manual, but
> can't get anywhere!
What zones are you using for metering?_ I don't lhave a 350D but a 300D, and
by using centre metering ( in the creative zones) gets the exposure right
( as you would expect) in the centre zone ONLY , so often on bright days I
find the sky and roof of the object being photographed way over-exposed.
 
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"GT" <ContactGT_remove_@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:42c93b67$0$3348$9a6e19ea@unlimited.newshosting.com...
> Got my EOS 350d a few months back and took it on holiday to a sunny place
> and all bright sunshine shots are over exposed by at least 2 stops!
> Obviously I compensated at the time by turning down the exposure by 2
> stops, but why do I need to do this. I chose Sunshine for the white
> balance and was using ISO 100 or 200.
>
> All shots were RAW, so I can adjust them on the PC, but you can only
> adjust so far from the original!
>
> The only way I could get decent pics was to use the full manual mode
> (normally prefer P for holiday snaps) and play around with the aperture
> and shutter speed to below -2 stops, which takes far too long for holiday
> snaps at the zoo and around the campsite.
>
> What am I doing wrong?
>
> How do I use the custom white balance setting. I have read the manual, but
> can't get anywhere!

I don't have your same camera but I do have similar problems.

The secret is the LCD viewing screen. Learn to use it carefully to get the
proper exposure the first time. Use spot metering and lock the aperture on
different parts of the scene until the overall picture on the LCD looks
right. Then frame the shot carefully and take the exposure.

LCD is better than TTL for knowing what the final image will look like.

ER
 
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In article <42c93b67$0$3348$9a6e19ea@unlimited.newshosting.com>,
"GT" <ContactGT_remove_@hotmail.com> wrote:

> Got my EOS 350d a few months back and took it on holiday to a sunny place
> and all bright sunshine shots are over exposed by at least 2 stops!
> Obviously I compensated at the time by turning down the exposure by 2 stops,
> but why do I need to do this. I chose Sunshine for the white balance and was
> using ISO 100 or 200.
>
> All shots were RAW, so I can adjust them on the PC, but you can only adjust
> so far from the original!
>
> The only way I could get decent pics was to use the full manual mode
> (normally prefer P for holiday snaps) and play around with the aperture and
> shutter speed to below -2 stops, which takes far too long for holiday snaps
> at the zoo and around the campsite.
>
> What am I doing wrong?
>
> How do I use the custom white balance setting. I have read the manual, but
> can't get anywhere!

First, make sure that no crud fell into the holes below the mirror.
That's where the metering and focus mechanisms are.

Also turn on the flash in direct sunlight. This lightens up the shadows
and reduces the exposure so the highlights aren't blown out. If you're
shooting at ranges too far for the flash you'll have to manually adjust
the exposure to decide whether you want to loose the highlights or
shadows to clipping.
 

PB

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<<I compensated at the time by turning down the exposure by 2 stops, but why
do I need to do this. I chose Sunshine for the white balance and was using
ISO 100 or 200.>>

You do know that white balance doesn't affect exposure times? If you have
too much of any particular area in the shot (unless it just happens to be
17% grey) this will skew the exposure calculation in the camera.

Paul
--
Paul ============}
o o

// Live fast, die old //
PaulsPages are at http://homepage.ntlworld.com/pcbradley/
 
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"ER" <evad@dodgeit.com> wrote in message
news:42c94473_1@newsgate.x-privat.org...
>
> "GT" <ContactGT_remove_@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:42c93b67$0$3348$9a6e19ea@unlimited.newshosting.com...
> > Got my EOS 350d a few months back and took it on holiday to a sunny
place
> > and all bright sunshine shots are over exposed by at least 2 stops!
> > Obviously I compensated at the time by turning down the exposure by 2
> > stops, but why do I need to do this. I chose Sunshine for the white
> > balance and was using ISO 100 or 200.
> >
> > All shots were RAW, so I can adjust them on the PC, but you can only
> > adjust so far from the original!
> >
> > The only way I could get decent pics was to use the full manual mode
> > (normally prefer P for holiday snaps) and play around with the aperture
> > and shutter speed to below -2 stops, which takes far too long for
holiday
> > snaps at the zoo and around the campsite.
> >
> > What am I doing wrong?
> >
> > How do I use the custom white balance setting. I have read the manual,
but
> > can't get anywhere!
>
> I don't have your same camera but I do have similar problems.
>
> The secret is the LCD viewing screen. Learn to use it carefully to get the
> proper exposure the first time. Use spot metering and lock the aperture on
> different parts of the scene until the overall picture on the LCD looks
> right. Then frame the shot carefully and take the exposure.
>
> LCD is better than TTL for knowing what the final image will look like.
>
> ER

What you want to do is learn how to read the histogram. The picture in the
LCD is gonna look different in bright sunlight or at night and can be very
misleading. If you know how to interpret the histogram along side seeing
the picture you will have much more luck. Also put your camera away when
the sun is at its strongest. Morning and evening light is much better then
a high noon sun for almost anything.
 

GT

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"Kevin McMurtrie" <mcmurtri@dslextreme.com> wrote in message
news:mcmurtri-2B6E63.10054304072005@corp-radius.supernews.com...
> In article <42c93b67$0$3348$9a6e19ea@unlimited.newshosting.com>,
> "GT" <ContactGT_remove_@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
>> Got my EOS 350d a few months back and took it on holiday to a sunny place
>> and all bright sunshine shots are over exposed by at least 2 stops!
>> Obviously I compensated at the time by turning down the exposure by 2
>> stops,
>> but why do I need to do this. I chose Sunshine for the white balance and
>> was
>> using ISO 100 or 200.
>>
>> All shots were RAW, so I can adjust them on the PC, but you can only
>> adjust
>> so far from the original!
>>
>> The only way I could get decent pics was to use the full manual mode
>> (normally prefer P for holiday snaps) and play around with the aperture
>> and
>> shutter speed to below -2 stops, which takes far too long for holiday
>> snaps
>> at the zoo and around the campsite.
>>
>> What am I doing wrong?
>>
>> How do I use the custom white balance setting. I have read the manual,
>> but
>> can't get anywhere!
>
> First, make sure that no crud fell into the holes below the mirror.
> That's where the metering and focus mechanisms are.
>
> Also turn on the flash in direct sunlight. This lightens up the shadows
> and reduces the exposure so the highlights aren't blown out. If you're
> shooting at ranges too far for the flash you'll have to manually adjust
> the exposure to decide whether you want to loose the highlights or
> shadows to clipping.


So basically, I've bought a £600 camera that will take any Canon EF lens
going, has a zero startup time, less shutter lag than a film-based SLR, will
take 3 frames a second (indefinitely with the right CF card), but can't take
holiday snaps round a French zoo in summer!! Great!
 
G

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"GT" <ContactGT_remove_@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:42ca5e66$0$14417$4dd03c44@unlimited.newshosting.com...
> "Kevin McMurtrie" <mcmurtri@dslextreme.com> wrote in message
> news:mcmurtri-2B6E63.10054304072005@corp-radius.supernews.com...
>> In article <42c93b67$0$3348$9a6e19ea@unlimited.newshosting.com>,
>> "GT" <ContactGT_remove_@hotmail.com> wrote:
>>
>>> Got my EOS 350d a few months back and took it on holiday to a sunny
>>> place
>>> and all bright sunshine shots are over exposed by at least 2 stops!
>>> Obviously I compensated at the time by turning down the exposure by 2
>>> stops,
>>> but why do I need to do this. I chose Sunshine for the white balance and
>>> was
>>> using ISO 100 or 200.
>>>
>>> All shots were RAW, so I can adjust them on the PC, but you can only
>>> adjust
>>> so far from the original!
>>>
>>> The only way I could get decent pics was to use the full manual mode
>>> (normally prefer P for holiday snaps) and play around with the aperture
>>> and
>>> shutter speed to below -2 stops, which takes far too long for holiday
>>> snaps
>>> at the zoo and around the campsite.
>>>
>>> What am I doing wrong?
>>>
>>> How do I use the custom white balance setting. I have read the manual,
>>> but
>>> can't get anywhere!
>>
>> First, make sure that no crud fell into the holes below the mirror.
>> That's where the metering and focus mechanisms are.
>>
>> Also turn on the flash in direct sunlight. This lightens up the shadows
>> and reduces the exposure so the highlights aren't blown out. If you're
>> shooting at ranges too far for the flash you'll have to manually adjust
>> the exposure to decide whether you want to loose the highlights or
>> shadows to clipping.
>
>
> So basically, I've bought a £600 camera that will take any Canon EF lens
> going, has a zero startup time, less shutter lag than a film-based SLR,
> will
> take 3 frames a second (indefinitely with the right CF card), but can't
> take
> holiday snaps round a French zoo in summer!! Great!
>
Yep, the same applies if you spend £6000 on a camera, nothings perfect-
there's always a compromise.
By the way did you take the time to calibrate the monitor before your
started.....Oh dear. there's another compromise....
 

Larry

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In article <42ca5e66$0$14417$4dd03c44@unlimited.newshosting.com>,
ContactGT_remove_@hotmail.com says...
> So basically, I've bought a £600 camera that will take any Canon EF lens
> going, has a zero startup time, less shutter lag than a film-based SLR, will
> take 3 frames a second (indefinitely with the right CF card), but can't take
> holiday snaps round a French zoo in summer!! Great!
>
>

Actually the situation is:

You bought a camera and haven't learned to USE it correctly.

You have to have some input (and you have to take the time to learn the
proper input).

If you are willing to do the work involved, you will get better pictures, On
the other hand, if you want snapshots, use a snapshot camera, and save the
DSLR for when you need it.


--
Larry Lynch
Mystic, Ct.
 
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In message <MPG.1d343a7fbeb5f2fe989a00@news.comcast.giganews.com>,
Larry <lastingimagery@comcast.dotnet> wrote:

>If you are willing to do the work involved, you will get better pictures, On
>the other hand, if you want snapshots, use a snapshot camera, and save the
>DSLR for when you need it.

Another option is to shoot in RAW + JPEG, and set your JPEG parameters
to P&S-like values; lowest contrast, boosted saturation, lotsa
sharpening, and + exposure compensation (-2 contrast on the Canon DSLRs,
in general, will allow a stop more highlights, so +1 EC is generally
safe with -2 contrast).

Then, you have the RAW to get a better transfer curve and white balance,
if you care to.
--

<>>< ><<> ><<> <>>< ><<> <>>< <>>< ><<>
John P Sheehy <JPS@no.komm>
><<> <>>< <>>< ><<> <>>< ><<> ><<> <>><
 
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"Larry" <lastingimagery@comcast.dotnet> wrote in message
news:MPG.1d343a7fbeb5f2fe989a00@news.comcast.giganews.com...
In article <42ca5e66$0$14417$4dd03c44@unlimited.newshosting.com>,
ContactGT_remove_@hotmail.com says...
> So basically, I've bought a £600 camera that will take any Canon EF lens
> going, has a zero startup time, less shutter lag than a film-based SLR,
will
> take 3 frames a second (indefinitely with the right CF card), but can't
take
> holiday snaps round a French zoo in summer!! Great!
>
>

Actually the situation is:

You bought a camera and haven't learned to USE it correctly.

You have to have some input (and you have to take the time to learn the
proper input).

--
No doubt, I didn't come across any reviews that stated the 350d was unable
to take a picture in the daylight with out dialing in ec-2. My 20d doesn't
have this problem nor my 300d.
 
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GT <ContactGT_remove_@hotmail.com> wrote:

> Got my EOS 350d a few months back and took it on holiday to a sunny place
> and all bright sunshine shots are over exposed by at least 2 stops!
> Obviously I compensated at the time by turning down the exposure by 2 stops,
> but why do I need to do this. I chose Sunshine for the white balance and was
> using ISO 100 or 200.
>
> All shots were RAW, so I can adjust them on the PC, but you can only adjust
> so far from the original!
>
> The only way I could get decent pics was to use the full manual mode
> (normally prefer P for holiday snaps) and play around with the aperture and
> shutter speed to below -2 stops, which takes far too long for holiday snaps
> at the zoo and around the campsite.
>
> What am I doing wrong?
>
> How do I use the custom white balance setting. I have read the manual, but
> can't get anywhere!

It would help to know the specifics of the shooting situation. Were you
trying to take a pic of someone backlit by a brightly-lit sky? Are these
bright spots you refer to reflections off glass or water? Is your
camera's metering set to multi-zone, center-weighted, or spot? Was EV
set to +2 and you didn't know it? Were you trying to photograph nuclear
explosions? :)
 

GT

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"Paul Mitchum" <usenet@mile23.c0m> wrote in message
news:1gz93hl.1nd8pa9rcau6fN%usenet@mile23.c0m...
> GT <ContactGT_remove_@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
>> Got my EOS 350d a few months back and took it on holiday to a sunny place
>> and all bright sunshine shots are over exposed by at least 2 stops!
>> Obviously I compensated at the time by turning down the exposure by 2
>> stops,
>> but why do I need to do this. I chose Sunshine for the white balance and
>> was
>> using ISO 100 or 200.
>>
>> All shots were RAW, so I can adjust them on the PC, but you can only
>> adjust
>> so far from the original!
>>
>> The only way I could get decent pics was to use the full manual mode
>> (normally prefer P for holiday snaps) and play around with the aperture
>> and
>> shutter speed to below -2 stops, which takes far too long for holiday
>> snaps
>> at the zoo and around the campsite.
>>
>> What am I doing wrong?
>>
>> How do I use the custom white balance setting. I have read the manual,
>> but
>> can't get anywhere!
>
> It would help to know the specifics of the shooting situation. Were you
> trying to take a pic of someone backlit by a brightly-lit sky? Are these
> bright spots you refer to reflections off glass or water? Is your
> camera's metering set to multi-zone, center-weighted, or spot? Was EV
> set to +2 and you didn't know it? Were you trying to photograph nuclear
> explosions? :)

Didn't spot any nuclear explosions at the zoo, but if there were any, I
would probably have tried to take photographs, but the EMP from the
explosion would probably have knocked out the electronics (aside from the
fact that I would be dead!)! No - just typical holiday shots - people in
sunshine, a trip to the zoo, so close + distant animals/subjects in
sunshine. Photographing a generally bright image and totally over exposed. I
am fairly new to the digital side of photography, but have had my old
film-based EOS for years. I did try changing the metering, but I don't think
it really made much difference. The camera behaves perfectly for other types
of shots - metering is perfect, no light or dark spots, its just really
bright sunshine that causes a problem. I'll have another play in August when
we go over to France again, trouble is we have a new baby and I'm missing,
or messing up photo opportunities on his first holiday(s) here! Don't get
much chance to practice photos in bright sunshine here in Scotland!
 

GT

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"Larry" <lastingimagery@comcast.dotnet> wrote in message
news:MPG.1d343a7fbeb5f2fe989a00@news.comcast.giganews.com...
> In article <42ca5e66$0$14417$4dd03c44@unlimited.newshosting.com>,
> ContactGT_remove_@hotmail.com says...
> > So basically, I've bought a £600 camera that will take any Canon EF lens
> > going, has a zero startup time, less shutter lag than a film-based SLR,
> > will
> > take 3 frames a second (indefinitely with the right CF card), but can't
> > take
> > holiday snaps round a French zoo in summer!! Great!
> >
> >
>
> Actually the situation is:
>
> You bought a camera and haven't learned to USE it correctly.
>
> You have to have some input (and you have to take the time to learn the
> proper input).

And that is why I have approached this group for help! Thanks for your
input - very helpful. Anything useful to contribute now?
 

Larry

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In article <42cb9ab5$0$5188$9a6e19ea@unlimited.newshosting.com>,
ContactGT_remove_@hotmail.com says...
> "Larry" <lastingimagery@comcast.dotnet> wrote in message
> news:MPG.1d343a7fbeb5f2fe989a00@news.comcast.giganews.com...
> > In article <42ca5e66$0$14417$4dd03c44@unlimited.newshosting.com>,
> > ContactGT_remove_@hotmail.com says...
> > > So basically, I've bought a £600 camera that will take any Canon EF lens
> > > going, has a zero startup time, less shutter lag than a film-based SLR,
> > > will
> > > take 3 frames a second (indefinitely with the right CF card), but can't
> > > take
> > > holiday snaps round a French zoo in summer!! Great!
> > >
> > >
> >
> > Actually the situation is:
> >
> > You bought a camera and haven't learned to USE it correctly.
> >
> > You have to have some input (and you have to take the time to learn the
> > proper input).
>
> And that is why I have approached this group for help! Thanks for your
> input - very helpful. Anything useful to contribute now?
>
>
>

If you could post a link to afew of the shots I probably could contribute
something.

OTOH it may well be that you simply tried to take photos with the bright sun
directly overhead, which hasnt ever worked well or easily, afaik.
--
Larry Lynch
Mystic, Ct.
 

GT

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"Dirty Harry" <NOJUNK@FU.ca> wrote in message
news:tYEye.1870741$Xk.1324323@pd7tw3no...
>
> "Larry" <lastingimagery@comcast.dotnet> wrote in message
> news:MPG.1d343a7fbeb5f2fe989a00@news.comcast.giganews.com...
> In article <42ca5e66$0$14417$4dd03c44@unlimited.newshosting.com>,
> ContactGT_remove_@hotmail.com says...
>> So basically, I've bought a £600 camera that will take any Canon EF lens
>> going, has a zero startup time, less shutter lag than a film-based SLR,
> will
>> take 3 frames a second (indefinitely with the right CF card), but can't
> take
>> holiday snaps round a French zoo in summer!! Great!
>>
>>
>
> Actually the situation is:
>
> You bought a camera and haven't learned to USE it correctly.
>
> You have to have some input (and you have to take the time to learn the
> proper input).
>
> --
> No doubt, I didn't come across any reviews that stated the 350d was unable
> to take a picture in the daylight with out dialing in ec-2. My 20d
> doesn't
> have this problem nor my 300d.

The camera doesn't have any trouble with daylight, dusk, morning, indoor,
outdoor, its just bright sunshine that causes a problem. I'm not talkilg
about glare or flare, simple over-exposing the entire image. No dark spots,
or light spots, but the whole image. I didn't spot any reviews that said
that either, hence my call for help from this digital.photography group!
 
G

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"GT" <ContactGT_remove_@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:42cb9a64$0$24850$9a6e19ea@unlimited.newshosting.com...
> "Paul Mitchum" <usenet@mile23.c0m> wrote in message
> news:1gz93hl.1nd8pa9rcau6fN%usenet@mile23.c0m...
>> GT <ContactGT_remove_@hotmail.com> wrote:
>>
>>> Got my EOS 350d a few months back and took it on holiday to a sunny
>>> place
>>> and all bright sunshine shots are over exposed by at least 2 stops!
>>> Obviously I compensated at the time by turning down the exposure by 2
>>> stops,
>>> but why do I need to do this. I chose Sunshine for the white balance and
>>> was
>>> using ISO 100 or 200.
>>>
>>> All shots were RAW, so I can adjust them on the PC, but you can only
>>> adjust
>>> so far from the original!
>>>
>>> The only way I could get decent pics was to use the full manual mode
>>> (normally prefer P for holiday snaps) and play around with the aperture
>>> and
>>> shutter speed to below -2 stops, which takes far too long for holiday
>>> snaps
>>> at the zoo and around the campsite.
>>>
>>> What am I doing wrong?
>>>
>>> How do I use the custom white balance setting. I have read the manual,
>>> but
>>> can't get anywhere!
>>
>> It would help to know the specifics of the shooting situation. Were you
>> trying to take a pic of someone backlit by a brightly-lit sky? Are these
>> bright spots you refer to reflections off glass or water? Is your
>> camera's metering set to multi-zone, center-weighted, or spot? Was EV
>> set to +2 and you didn't know it? Were you trying to photograph nuclear
>> explosions? :)
>
> Didn't spot any nuclear explosions at the zoo, but if there were any, I
> would probably have tried to take photographs, but the EMP from the
> explosion would probably have knocked out the electronics (aside from the
> fact that I would be dead!)! No - just typical holiday shots - people in
> sunshine, a trip to the zoo, so close + distant animals/subjects in
> sunshine. Photographing a generally bright image and totally over exposed.
> I am fairly new to the digital side of photography, but have had my old
> film-based EOS for years. I did try changing the metering, but I don't
> think it really made much difference. The camera behaves perfectly for
> other types of shots - metering is perfect, no light or dark spots, its
> just really bright sunshine that causes a problem. I'll have another play
> in August when we go over to France again, trouble is we have a new baby
> and I'm missing, or messing up photo opportunities on his first holiday(s)
> here! Don't get much chance to practice photos in bright sunshine here in
> Scotland!
>
>
What lens are you using? Do you have a lens hood for it to cut down on
flare?
I'm new to dslr's too. I've only had my 350D for just over a month. After
about 2000 shots, I'm starting to get the hang of it. I only ever shoot in
raw and manual settings. Lots of bright, mid-day shots and I haven't had any
problems with washed out (over exposed) shots. I primarily us a 70-200L f4
but I've been using the kit lens quite a bit lately.
 
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GT <ContactGT_remove_@hotmail.com> wrote:
:
: The camera doesn't have any trouble with daylight, dusk, morning, indoor,
: outdoor, its just bright sunshine that causes a problem. I'm not talkilg
: about glare or flare, simple over-exposing the entire image. No dark spots,
: or light spots, but the whole image. I didn't spot any reviews that said
: that either, hence my call for help from this digital.photography group!

It *is* possible that your camera is defective, too.

Not sure what/where/how, just putting it out there for consideration!

-Charles

--
Charles Robinson
Minneapolis, MN
charlesr@visi.com
http://charles.robinsontwins.org
 
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"ER" <evad@dodgeit.com> writes:

> "GT" <ContactGT_remove_@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:42c93b67$0$3348$9a6e19ea@unlimited.newshosting.com...
> > Got my EOS 350d a few months back and took it on holiday to a sunny place
> > and all bright sunshine shots are over exposed by at least 2 stops!
> > Obviously I compensated at the time by turning down the exposure by 2
> > stops, but why do I need to do this. I chose Sunshine for the white
> > balance and was using ISO 100 or 200.
> >
> > All shots were RAW, so I can adjust them on the PC, but you can only
> > adjust so far from the original!
> >
> > The only way I could get decent pics was to use the full manual mode
> > (normally prefer P for holiday snaps) and play around with the aperture
> > and shutter speed to below -2 stops, which takes far too long for holiday
> > snaps at the zoo and around the campsite.
> >
> > What am I doing wrong?
> >
> > How do I use the custom white balance setting. I have read the manual, but
> > can't get anywhere!
>
> I don't have your same camera but I do have similar problems.
>
> The secret is the LCD viewing screen. Learn to use it carefully to get the
> proper exposure the first time. Use spot metering and lock the aperture on
> different parts of the scene until the overall picture on the LCD looks
> right. Then frame the shot carefully and take the exposure.

Ummm, the original poster has a Canon 350d, which is a DSLR. With few
exceptions (long dead Olympus E10/E20, Fuji S3, etc.) DSLRs do not display the
image on the LCD until you take the picture.

--
Michael Meissner
email: mrmnews@the-meissners.org
http://www.the-meissners.org
 
G

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Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

If found evaluative metering supprisingly reliable. Sure, in backlit
scenes parts of the sky are blown out but that's normal. I shoot a lot
in situations it is a bit fooled but -1/3 or -2/3 exposure compensation
gets it just right (a bit dark subjects).

Make sure it is not you. Double check the metering mode, for example
partial mode makes the selected point expose like middle gray. In
evaluative mode selecting a dark point makes the rest of the scene blown
out probably.

Oh, another thing to check: a firmware update bug! If you updated
firmware while you had for example EC +2 dialed in you'll have +2ec
"default" afterwards (ie when you now select +0 EC). Similarly if you
now dial +2ec you'll actually have +4 ec (and -2ec makes it +0) and so on.

I run into that but after updating my firmware. Fortunately you can fix
that by reseting all the setting to the factory defaults by a single
menu selection.

You can always test it with a gray card (or a white paper). If a there
is no bug issue and a full-frame paper is not exposed as a middle gray
there is something wrong with the camera.
--
Harri
 

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