WhatsApp Accused of Violating International Privacy Laws

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Vorador2

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You know, it's perfectly made clear when you're installing the app. If you don't like that it needs access to your address book, don't use it.

The only problem could be what Whatsapp is doing with the contacts, but it is explained in the category Privacy in the terms of use.

So this is pretty much a waste of time for everyone.
 

dns7950

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[citation][nom]scythe944[/nom]Well, glad I don't have an idiotphone or this app.[/citation]
I hate Apple and am usually the first one to bash iPhones, but when I say something I usually have a reason for it... This is just a reading comprehension fail, the article clearly states that "iPhone users who have iOS 6 installed are asked if they wish to allow an application to access sensitive data on the smartphone including location and contact list data.".. Meaning this privacy violation affects everyone EXCEPT iPhone 5 users. So you are glad you don't have an iPhone, because you would really hate it if you had the option of not allowing an app to download your contact list? Learn to read the article before you make moronic comments..
 

thecolorblue

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[citation][nom]Vorador2[/nom]You know, it's perfectly made clear when you're installing the app. If you don't like that it needs access to your address book, don't use it.The only problem could be what Whatsapp is doing with the contacts, but it is explained in the category Privacy in the terms of use.So this is pretty much a waste of time for everyone.[/citation]
"The practice violates both Canadian and Dutch privacy law."
 

santfu

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@ dns7950

Do you have a chip on your shoulder? I suspect that scythe944 was making a comment against all SMARTphones, see idiot is opposite to smart. clever eh?
 
G

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@ dns7950

I'm pretty sure scythe944 was not talking about the iPhone. Let's read the moronic comments before making equally moronic comments. As Vorador2 put it, "this is pretty much a waste of time for everyone."
 

raytseng

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Yet no lawsuit on the mobile phone providers that have the monopoly to charge 20cents for a few kilobytes of data transfer over their cell networks; which is the main reason why this app is so popular to begin with...
 

plasmastorm

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What all of you who babble on about "read the t's &c's, if you dont like dont use" seem to fail to realise is that when it uploads your entire phonebook those numbers are other peoples. And they may not be too happy about you essentially giving their data away for what will most likely in the future be used for spam etc.
I give it a few months before someone in the US sues a friend over this.
 

alyoshka

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Every app asks you what you want the app to access and what you don't. As far as I see the point, the Hashed numbers are stored on the users Phone and not on WhatsApp's servers....
But I can understand the 300Billion messages that were sent free with as a loss to the telecos instead as being sent as messages that are charged..... and then having an Apple tinge in the whole thing makes complete sense....
 

olaf

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I still say that the underlying problem is with the smartphone os's and not the app. Regarding people suing eachother over this in the states, what can you expect when a society is used to sue eacbother for a hang nail in order to get some fee money.
 

wemakeourfuture

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[citation][nom]Vorador2[/nom]You know, it's perfectly made clear when you're installing the app. If you don't like that it needs access to your address book, don't use it.The only problem could be what Whatsapp is doing with the contacts, but it is explained in the category Privacy in the terms of use.So this is pretty much a waste of time for everyone.[/citation]

Terms of Service don't mean anything if they violate the laws of a nation. You clearly do not understand basic law.

Does not matter what Facebook, WhatsApp or any other companies Terms of Service is. The Privacy Commissioner in Canada will enforce Canadian Privacy Law on any company doing business in Canada / has Canadian customers. These companies' Terms of Service MUST comply with Privacy Laws and cannot contradict them even if stated in their Terms of Service.
 

wemakeourfuture

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[citation][nom]olaf[/nom]Read the terms ffs dont like it dont use it....stop crying over every meaningless shit...[/citation]

You're dumb.. Simple. If you're in a country and have laws and company must abide by the laws. If a company is violating the laws then their service and/or products must be in compliant with the law. In this case they do not comply with Canadian and Dutch Privacy Law.

You obviously do not know anything about this, just to give you additional history. Facebook's terms of service and use of private information contradicted Canadian Privacy Law. Facebook was made to changed how they handled user's deleted data which ended up changing not only how Facebook handled private information in Canada (for the good) but for all the users on Earth. Now a billion Facebook users can thank Canada's Privacy Commissioner for having more control over their information.

Doesn't matter what a company's Terms of Service or what you agree to are! It must comply with the law.

You can sign an employment contract that says you get paid $0.50 an hour and horrible work conditions in Canada. This is UNLAWFUL, does not matter if you agree, the company's policy violates Canadian Labour Laws and a court would easily award you (the worker) with the rightful compensation and work conditions no matter what was agreed upon.
 

f-14

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[citation][nom]Vorador2[/nom]You know, it's perfectly made clear when you're installing the app. If you don't like that it needs access to your address book, don't use it.The only problem could be what Whatsapp is doing with the contacts, but it is explained in the category Privacy in the terms of use.So this is pretty much a waste of time for everyone.[/citation]

hey brainless, how long have you been hanging out smoking your last brain cells with george w bush?
i don't have an idiot phone, nor DID I OR DO I consent for some one else to give away my number to some other party, do you see the violation now? if not i'll send my recommendation you be allowed into the D.E.A. storage evidence lock up and you can finish the job that's apparently almost complete with a few tons of premium whatever it takes to snuff your life out using your own two hands, because quiet frankly the only thing you're good for is fertilizer, and apparently you are quiet full of it with what you just spouted out.
 

mrjhh

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The terms and conditions of using WhatsApp are pretty explicit that it is intended for use within the US, and to be governed by California law. Perhaps the terms have changed since this case was brought, but why should WhatsApp be required to cowtow to every foreign demand, when they are not located in or do any business in those other countries? They certainly aren't charging for the app, so no business is being done in the foreign country.

At most, the Dutch government could pressure Google to remove WhatsApp from the Play store in Holland. That is if they want to be seen as being like Pakistan and others who censor YouTube, they could do this. Since Canada can't sanction, I'm not sure why they even bother with their privacy agency.

California has stricter privacy laws than most other US states, so if the terms are against California law, then there is a case to be made, but only under California law, and California law only protects Californians, and is pretty much limited to having a privacy policy.
 

wemakeourfuture

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[citation][nom]mrjhh[/nom]The terms and conditions of using WhatsApp are pretty explicit that it is intended for use within the US, and to be governed by California law. Perhaps the terms have changed since this case was brought, but why should WhatsApp be required to cowtow to every foreign demand, when they are not located in or do any business in those other countries? They certainly aren't charging for the app, so no business is being done in the foreign country.At most, the Dutch government could pressure Google to remove WhatsApp from the Play store in Holland. That is if they want to be seen as being like Pakistan and others who censor YouTube, they could do this. Since Canada can't sanction, I'm not sure why they even bother with their privacy agency.California has stricter privacy laws than most other US states, so if the terms are against California law, then there is a case to be made, but only under California law, and California law only protects Californians, and is pretty much limited to having a privacy policy.[/citation]

1. You don't understand law
2. If you do business in a country you're bound by those laws
I) Either you make the change globally for that product to fit all laws (ex. Facebook had to change how they handled deleted users due to Canada Privacy Law, and applied the new and better deletion process across the globe)
II) You provide a variant that is compliant with that nation's law (ex. Apple must provide a Micro USB adapter / wire with its device since the European Union has a regulation that all mobile devices must charge with a standard Micro-USB. Apple did not change their products but provide a variant for that market).

Also, Canada can't sanction, what are you talking about? The Privacy Commissioner's recommendation to comply with Canadian law over an app would never go to the level of national sanctions against America. Who cares if they can't sanction, that has no bearing on this case or other similar ones in the past (ex. Facebook). It will just require compliance with the law in a reasonable time or not be allowed since it violates the law (Privacy Law).

A Canadian citizen, or Dutch, or whoever is not bound by California law, its bound by their respective nations law. Perhaps you should study law in high school or read some basic 101 books before you're critical on anything.
 
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