News Why I bought an induction stovetop — and what I wish I knew beforehand

May 16, 2021
2
0
10
0
Generally good advice but totally off base in "how induction works".
"excites the molecules in pots and pans that aren’t good conductors, like iron or steel." ... This is just wrong.
Electromagnetic field induces a current in ferromagnetic materials like iron and steel. This current flowing through the iron and steel creates heat. Nothing to do with excited molecules(?) or even excited atoms.
No "molecular connection". In fact, no molecules.
Also, generally a good idea to avoid scratches (you can put a paper towel under the pan to prevent scratches) but scratches will not affect the "molecular connection" or dull the strength of the field.
Best to learn some basic science.
(BTW, absolutely impossible to "scorch" an aluminum pan with induction. Aluminum on an induction cooktop will do absolutely nothing... no heat, won't turn on, no scorching. Did you just make this part up?)
 

jlehew

Distinguished
Oct 30, 2009
1
1
18,510
0
Yes, induction works different than gas or electric coils or electric glass top but at the end of the day it is the best. I’ve had all 4 types of stove tops. It is the hands down winner. Gas is a distant second choice and I will never use electric again

Induction saves me $50/mo on electricity. More stovetop efficiency means my A/C doesn’t have to pump as much heat outside. When cooking all day my kitchen is much cooler and the length of time the stovetop is on is much less after I installed this. The top is more efficient and on less time. Win-win, This easily pays to switch to induction.

It saves 10 minutes every time you cook or 30 minutes a day! That time adds up! it instantly heats up sizzling bacon or onions in 45 seconds. It boils water in 2 to 4 minutes, faster than microwaving when using the Boost feature on my Bosch 800 induction.

An unexpected benefit…. We can now perfectly fry foods at home. Fried Orange Roughy or Chicken Fried Chicken comes out wonderful every time. The auto chef feature keeps the pan and oil at 350 F better than I could do manually. As food finish frying they lose moisture that keeps the oil cool. When they run out of steam literally, the oil temperature spikes and it burns the flour that came off in the oil and that burnt taste would go into the next/last batch of fried chicken. No longer a problem. The Auto chef keeps flour and your foods from burning.

Cleaning is sooooo easy… a paper towel and fantastic is all that is needed daily. Once a month I, use a magic eraser to get a couple of spots. And once a year I use oven cleaner to get it to look like brand new. The surface doesn’t get as hot and doesn’t turn splatters into baked on black carbon.

It is safer because it doesn’t get that hot! if your little one reaches up and touches the stovetop, it probably would not burn them where you have to go to the ER, it doesn’t get very hot and the heat it gets is from the pan

For pans I buy a set of Anolon Nouvelle Copper during Christmas when they go on sale 60% off. They work great. yes you will most likely need new pans. Aluminum pans don’t work but the steel chef pans from France do work

Careful with cast iron. The instructions say not to use cast iron and I’m not sure why but I suspect the cast iron can get super hot and could damage the pan or glass top. I don’t use it very often except a tortilla iron. When I use it, I put a paper towel under it and don’t put it higher than 5. So far so good.

For the few times I want gas or need to because the power is out due to a hurricane or flood, I have a portable indoor burner.

you can try induction and get a portable induction cooktop too, that is a cheap way to try it

there is nothing better than an Induction stovetop!
 
Last edited:
Reactions: Melajoh
May 16, 2021
2
0
10
0
Just moving into a new kitchen with and induction range. I have been testing induction for the past year using a countertop induction unit and I love it.
Best is the easy clean up. No baked on crust. Just wipe with a sponge. Perfect temperature control. Fast heating.
 
May 16, 2021
2
1
10
0
Other benefits: No carbon dioxide, combustion gases, or soot released in your house. How does it really work? An induction hob in the stove creates an oscillating magnetic field that generates a magnetic flux, which produces an eddy current in the ferrous (iron or steel, which contains iron) pot. The eddy current flowing through the resistance of iron in the pot heats it. Since the heat is generated in the pot, rather than flowing under/around it, induction is much more efficient.

One of the other commenters mentioned a copper pot: that won't work unless the copper is clad with steel or iron. You can also find aluminum pans clad with copper or iron. The easiest way to see if a pot will work with an induction stove is to test it with a magnet. If the magnet sticks, the pot will work.

My hunch is that it won't be very long before fire and environmental codes won't allow natural gas in new construction, so now's a good time to get used to induction cooking. Its like moving from a flip phone to a smart phone, you'll never go back.
 
Thread starter Similar threads Forum Replies Date
admin Article Commentary 0
admin Article Commentary 0
admin Article Commentary 0
admin Article Commentary 0
admin Article Commentary 0
admin Article Commentary 0
admin Article Commentary 16
admin Article Commentary 0
admin Article Commentary 0
admin Article Commentary 0
admin Article Commentary 0
admin Article Commentary 0
admin Article Commentary 0
admin Article Commentary 7
admin Article Commentary 1
admin Article Commentary 0
admin Article Commentary 0
admin Article Commentary 0
admin Article Commentary 0
admin Article Commentary 3

ASK THE COMMUNITY