I can't find a match, need nongaming laptop. Please assist

Loysius

Estimable
Jul 24, 2015
4
0
4,510
0
Hello everyone,

I'm looking for something a lot different from what I've been finding in other similar posts. I need a laptop for CS and minor autoCAD stuff but I really don't care about the gpu. I want to find a 4k display, 256gb ssd, 8GB memory. I'm fine with integrated graphics. Simply as cheap as possible.

If there is an amazing deal then perhaps drop display to 1440p but realllly prefer a 4k display. No concerns with the form factor.

Refurbished laptops may be fine and if there are laptops meeting the criteria coming out within next 4 months or so then I could hold on until then.

The closest I've found so far is $859.99 Open-Box Yoga 3 Pro - 80HE000DUS.


I really appreciate any help that may be given,

Sincerely,
Loysius
 

The 3200x1800 screen on the Yoga 3 Pro is pentile. Normally I don't have a problem with pentile screens - your eyes have better green resolution, and pentile adapts to this by using a RGBG subpixel arrangement instead of RGB. This pretty much balances out the fewer subpixels used in pentile (4 subpixels per two physical pixels vs 6 subpixels per two physical pixels, or RGBG vs. RGBRGB).
http://nfggames.com/games/ntsc/visual.shtm

But the pentile used in the Yoga 3 Pro is a bastardization called RGBW. The idea behind RGBW is that you can increase the screen's brightness for office tasks by using the W (white) subpixel. That lets all the backlight through, in contrast to the R, G, and B subpixels which only let 33% of the backlight through. So you can get a brighter screen using less backlight power. Unfortunately:

1) Without the extra G subpixel, your effective resolution is half that of a traditional RGB array. Effectively the "3200x1800" screen has the color resolution of a 2263x1273 screen. That's still better than 1080p, but...

2) The subpixel layout is effectively diagonal (tilted at 45 degrees), so doesn't line up precisely with the computer's virtualized idea of pixels. If you have good eyes or look at the screen closely, this can appear as fuzziness or jaggedness on vertical and horizontal lines and font edges. A true RGBG pentile display has high enough color resolution that you usually don't notice this. Not so with RGBW.

3) Colors are muted when the W subpixel is used. This is the cause of the "mustard yellows" problem frequently reported by owners.

4) The "fix" for (3) is to simply leave the W subpixel off. That fixes the colors, but now you've got black subpixels blocking light from 25% of the screen's surface area. The screen thus ends up being dimmer than if they'd just gone with a regular RGB screen, and uses more power if you crank it up to the same brightness as a RGB screen. In other words, (4) completely defeats the reason for RGBW existing in the first place.
 

naturesninja

Honorable
Dec 15, 2013
389
0
11,210
60
Loysius,
Hello and welcome to the forum. To get started, are you are looking for a laptop with a 4k display, or one that can output to a 4k display via hdmi/dvi? 4k native resolution laptops are not cheap, and will require a decent gpu. One that can display onto a 4k monitor or tv via hdmi/dvi is a bit different. Let us know, so we can help you out further!
Thanks,
Ron
 

Loysius

Estimable
Jul 24, 2015
4
0
4,510
0
Thanks for responding naturesninja. I'm looking for 4k native resolution laptop, or if it is indeed a very significant price drop 1440p and up.

Thanks,
Loysius
 

naturesninja

Honorable
Dec 15, 2013
389
0
11,210
60
Hello again. I would recommend the lenovo y50 series of laptops as a quality 4k system. They start at roughly $1,200 usd. It seems the 1440p's are being phased out and cost as much if not more than many 4k designs. here are a few I recommend, specifically the one on the left:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Productcompare.aspx?Submit=ENE&N=100006740%20600515142%20600451155%20600477201%20600376847&IsNodeId=1&bop=And&CompareItemList=32|9SIA6863387505^A686_130775625714855689E5oshTgPFO%23%2C34-319-110^34-319-110-14%23&percm=9SIA6863387505%3A%24%24%24%24%24%24%24%3B34-319-110%3A%24%24%24%24%24%24%24
 

The 3200x1800 screen on the Yoga 3 Pro is pentile. Normally I don't have a problem with pentile screens - your eyes have better green resolution, and pentile adapts to this by using a RGBG subpixel arrangement instead of RGB. This pretty much balances out the fewer subpixels used in pentile (4 subpixels per two physical pixels vs 6 subpixels per two physical pixels, or RGBG vs. RGBRGB).
http://nfggames.com/games/ntsc/visual.shtm

But the pentile used in the Yoga 3 Pro is a bastardization called RGBW. The idea behind RGBW is that you can increase the screen's brightness for office tasks by using the W (white) subpixel. That lets all the backlight through, in contrast to the R, G, and B subpixels which only let 33% of the backlight through. So you can get a brighter screen using less backlight power. Unfortunately:

1) Without the extra G subpixel, your effective resolution is half that of a traditional RGB array. Effectively the "3200x1800" screen has the color resolution of a 2263x1273 screen. That's still better than 1080p, but...

2) The subpixel layout is effectively diagonal (tilted at 45 degrees), so doesn't line up precisely with the computer's virtualized idea of pixels. If you have good eyes or look at the screen closely, this can appear as fuzziness or jaggedness on vertical and horizontal lines and font edges. A true RGBG pentile display has high enough color resolution that you usually don't notice this. Not so with RGBW.

3) Colors are muted when the W subpixel is used. This is the cause of the "mustard yellows" problem frequently reported by owners.

4) The "fix" for (3) is to simply leave the W subpixel off. That fixes the colors, but now you've got black subpixels blocking light from 25% of the screen's surface area. The screen thus ends up being dimmer than if they'd just gone with a regular RGB screen, and uses more power if you crank it up to the same brightness as a RGB screen. In other words, (4) completely defeats the reason for RGBW existing in the first place.
 

Loysius

Estimable
Jul 24, 2015
4
0
4,510
0
Thank you Solandri, I never would have figured. Almost got tricked by a marketing play. Thanks for saving me.



Naturesninja thanks to you too. The Lenovo Y50 series is definitely a contender. My autoCAD use doesn't use any heavy designs. I design parts and have them made through a 3D printing service for projects. At most I only have a dozen small parts that I'm working with at once. Screen real estate, a ssd, and price tag are the most important things for me.

Thanks everyone,
Loysius
 
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