In Defense of the Intel Compute Stick

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Goodspike

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Mar 3, 2015
25
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4,580
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I believe the biggest detractor is the price. Its just not $150 worth of computing power. Just my .02
Realize things get more expensive as they are made smaller. Also, if I recall correctly, they have to pay Microsoft more for the Windows license on this than the tiny netbooks because it doesn't have a tiny monitor.
 

baazing

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Feb 14, 2014
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4,510
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For home use I'm not too sold on this product, but I see all kinds of usefulness in the business sector, especially once you throw on a powered usb hub. The linux version especially would be great for a pxe boot to a full remote session on a terminal server.
 

Wayne Thompson

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Apr 26, 2015
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I see people are extremely short-sited. Needless to say, what's the deal with the top pic? Very deceiving... I saw that first which got me to read the article until most the way down the page realized the pic was more a display of artistic license which has no place in this industry ESPECIALLY considering the idea was to point out the failures of the naysayers. That was not good form and does not lend to legitimize the product. In fact, I find it hard to believe most anything the writer is saying about the product due to the attempt to make the device appear SO much smaller than it truly is. What else is being lied about?
 

Vlad Rose

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Apr 7, 2014
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Their biggest issue is that they need to fix the bugs with this device before it can even be considered practical. As he even confirmed, a hub is pretty much a necessity for this device as the wifi and bluetooth don't work quite right. Wait until at least version 2.0
 

cats_Paw

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Oct 19, 2007
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I think the device is a "step in the right direction", but there is yet some ground to cover.
Personally, I would rather have a very light (even if a bit bulky) laptop that has decent horsepower, but that is hardly possible due to heat dissipation requirements.

In a few years, this can well be a way to carry with you your "work" computer, but I assume gaming on a device small and light is still something a bit far away.
 

Vlad Rose

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Apr 7, 2014
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I was thinking of it for the same thing originally. The wireless and bluetooth issues were a deal breaker for me right away. I had also done some research and found out that the quad core Atom is about as powerful as a single core from a Core2Duo; which struggles on the laptop I'm currently I'm currently using for my HTPC. As a result, it'd be a step down, outside a smaller size.
 

IntrepidSuccess

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Apr 30, 2015
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4,510
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I think the biggest win for these devices are uses that aren't even commonplace yet. I've been working out separate functional networks for home automation, my workshop, and our inhome entertainment. Working with a very tight budget, this sort of device will let me remove most of the administrative/configuration functionality that's not needed for daily use on those networks and secure it in the absence of better industry-standard options. A lightweight, super secure version of Linux and my safe will make this fun =D Granted, that's not an everyman use for the device, but hey - we're called early adopters for a reason!
 
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