Microsoft Explains Why It Doesn't Release Titles Digitally on Launch Day

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jhansonxi

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[citation][nom]getochkn[/nom]I would also think digital downloads on day one will just overload servers, make it harder for people to connect and then bitch online.[/citation]
QoS and dynamic bandwidth/server alloction can prevent that problem, at least on their end. Your ISP may still have problems.

Eventually retail software is going to disappear. The future of retail hardware is more difficult to predict. Internet vendors have much less overhead costs and their customers often avoid paying sales tax (and ignore "use" tax liabilities).
 

tranzz

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"QoS and dynamic bandwidth/server alloction can prevent that problem, at least on their end. Your ISP may still have problems."

Ask EA how that went for them recently
 

Murissokah

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[citation][nom]brandonjclark[/nom]"Eventually retail software is going to disappear." NEVER going to happen.[/citation]

While I agree that there is space for hard copies of software, as is the case with collectors' edition items, the bulk of software purchases should always be digital.

It just doesn't make sense to go through the trouble of burning a copy, creating art for the box, manufacturing a box, distributing the box and leaving it on the shelves so maybe someone will buy. And when someone does buy it, they will install the software and then download everything again since its largely outdated. Sending the software from the manufacturer to the user is much more straightforward and economically viable.
 

vittau

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[citation][nom]brandonjclark[/nom]"Eventually retail software is going to disappear." NEVER going to happen.[/citation]
NEVER say never.
 

mortsmi7

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[citation][nom]Murissokah[/nom]While I agree that there is space for hard copies of software, as is the case with collectors' edition items, the bulk of software purchases should always be digital. It just doesn't make sense to go through the trouble of burning a copy, creating art for the box, manufacturing a box, distributing the box and leaving it on the shelves so maybe someone will buy. And when someone does buy it, they will install the software and then download everything again since its largely outdated. Sending the software from the manufacturer to the user is much more straightforward and economically viable.[/citation]
I guess all those people still on dial-up are SOL then.
 

ddpruitt

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[citation][nom]brandonjclark[/nom]"Eventually retail software is going to disappear." NEVER going to happen.[/citation]

People will NEVER stop paying for cable

People will NEVER stop buying CDs

People will NEVER need more than 640Kb

Personal computers will NEVER catch on

So how's that never working out for you?
 

jhansonxi

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[citation][nom]tranzz[/nom]"QoS and dynamic bandwidth/server alloction can prevent that problem, at least on their end. Your ISP may still have problems."Ask EA how that went for them recently[/citation]That's a solvavle technical problem. I don't think EA sets the standard for large-scale IT. If anything, they're a counter-example.
 

gm0n3y

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I can see how this makes sense for M$. By waiting one day to release a digital download of a game they give a decent boost to retail sales of that game, which makes the retailers happy. In exchange for this, they will (or can be persuaded to) give the xbox better visibility than its competitors, especially since they will be selling more xbox games (as per above) than the others. It's really a win/win. And how many people really care that much about getting a game the moment it is released? And for those that do, they are going to buy the game anyway, so M$ still gets their money.
 

Murissokah

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[citation][nom]mortsmi7[/nom]I guess all those people still on dial-up are SOL then.[/citation]

If those people on dial-up could afford to buy retail software, they wouldn't be on dial-up.
 

jhansonxi

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[citation][nom]mortsmi7[/nom]I guess all those people still on dial-up are SOL then.[/citation]I know people who got rid of their desktop PC because they use their smartphone or tablet for everything. Likely their PC was budget model and their Internet options were dial-up or satellite, but with cellular Internet bandwidth increasing even in rural areas it suffices for many casual gamers.
 

mobrocket

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[citation][nom]ddpruitt[/nom]People will NEVER stop paying for cablePeople will NEVER stop buying CDsPeople will NEVER need more than 640KbPersonal computers will NEVER catch onSo how's that never working out for you?[/citation]

People will NEVER say NEVER whatever they do
 

mindless728

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[citation][nom]Murissokah[/nom]If those people on dial-up could afford to buy retail software, they wouldn't be on dial-up.[/citation]

do you not realize that there are still people that live in areas where the only thing available to then is dial-up or satellite internet, it sometimes has nothing to do with money
 

jhansonxi

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[citation][nom]Murissokah[/nom]If those people on dial-up could afford to buy retail software, they wouldn't be on dial-up.[/citation]I have friends that can't afford cable/DSL so they just use a laptop and public WiFi for downloads. Obviously that has limits for multiplayer games but it works for them. It also saves them $50 a month they can then spend on games. They just can't afford both high-speed Internet and good games.
 

agentbb007

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If everyone keeps getting rid of retail pretty soon there will be no jobs and no one will be able to buy their digital copies.
 

rawoysters

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[citation][nom]Murissokah[/nom]If those people on dial-up could afford to buy retail software, they wouldn't be on dial-up.[/citation]

Most people are not still on dial up because they can't afford broadband. It is a matter of logistics, being in a place (too rural, etc.) where they simply cannot get broadband.
 

DRosencraft

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This makes sense. Most people don't buy games day one anyway, so postponing the release of the digital version only hurts the ultra-hyped gamers who absolutely hate the idea of ever not being one of the first to play it. I doubt there are very many who don't but a game only because it has a delayed digital release. It still makes a lot of sense to support brick-and-mortar stores since whether it's cost, location, or whatever, there are a lot of people who don't have the internet speed or latency to download files of the size of some games. My internet is only 10Mbps, and it took nearly two hours to download a demon for Dead Space 3. This is the fastest internet connection in the area for a residential home. Fat chance of doing something like that regularly, eating up the entire house's internet access over several hours for just one game.
 
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