Glauber's Salt

gahleon

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Jan 7, 2006
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Ok, I hope someone can tell me this because I have been thinking about purchasing termaltake ixoft passive notebook cooler. It uses a compound called sodium sulfate decahydrate, also known as Glauber's salt, which displaces heat as it is heated and turns from solid to liquid.

The reviews that I have checked say that depending on the cooling system of the laptop this thing can actually shave off up to 10C. My only issue is that I don't know how long the reaction continue working. Will performance decrease over time? I mean I'm sure it has a decent lifespan but I have no idea how long it is and I find it necessary in determining whether this thing is worth 35/40 bucks.

Can someone please give me a hand with this. Btw, I hope that I didn't post this in the wrong place. Sorry in advance if I did.
 

MU_Engineer

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Ok, I hope someone can tell me this because I have been thinking about purchasing termaltake ixoft passive notebook cooler. It uses a compound called sodium sulfate decahydrate, also known as Glauber's salt, which displaces heat as it is heated and turns from solid to liquid.

The reviews that I have checked say that depending on the cooling system of the laptop this thing can actually shave off up to 10C. My only issue is that I don't know how long the reaction continue working. Will performance decrease over time?
The cooler works via a phase-change mechanism. The CPU (or whatever needs cooled) warms the Na2SO4*10 H2O to its melting point. The Na2SO4*10 H2O is like any other solid and requires energy input to melt the solid while the temperature stays constant. That putting in of energy without a temperature rise is called heat of fusion and is around 200.8 kJ/mol and the melting point is 32 C. The part being cooled thus has to pump more heat in getting the temp of the cooler to exceed 32 C than it would for something like copper, whose melting point is far in excess of normal CPU temps.

Heating and cooling cycles should not affect the salt as it's merely a physical change. The only thing that could possibly happen is that there is a leak somewhere in the system and allows the salt to come in contact with air and be contaminated- specifically, dehydrate.

Now is it worth the money? Good question. Most notebooks can be run pretty warm with little trouble, how hot is yours? And where is it hot?
 

Gneisenau

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I believe they have been using this or at least something similar for years now, it's pretty mature. Do the heat pipes in todays HSF use this? I think at least some of them use a phase change system.
A decade ago we used to purchase a ton of heat exchangers for electrical cabinets. These used a sodium salt process that did this very same thing. They lasted for years and drew almost no power. (just the inside and outside box fans. They kept the cabinets to with-in 5deg. F of ambiant. I think it will last fine.

My problem is the fact that is just comes in contact with the bottom of the laptop. My laptops have fans down there. I would have to think it would disrupt the airflow and cause an overheat in that case.
 

gahleon

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Well guys I really appreciate it. As far as the last comment, I noticed on some of the reviews, that this particular cooler was not for laptops that had advanced cooling ducting that directed the air straight out of the cooler. I think, however, it would do a fantastic job with the HDD as well as the memory and optical drive cooling as in all laptops those components get relatively hot. I'm not so worried about the CPU per se, but rather I'm worried about the other components. Most of the cooling pads just kinda suck in general. It is not in direct contact it is enclosed. You should check it out Thermaltake's ixoft. It looks promising. From most reviews it seems to make the laptops run 10C cooler which is huge! Especially because it is passive. So, as far as everyone knows it should last for a long time?

Because I'm not completely convinced. I mean so far it seems better than a cheap laptop cooler but those things will surely cool somewhat and they cost less, (seen some of 20 bucks). However, I am sure those are junk. Thanks to all those who have replied because most haven't even bothered to check it out. I appreciate it.

If anyone has one please let me know! I want to know how it does!
 

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