Gov. Can Now Track Your Phones Without Warrant

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kooltime

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Do they mean the GPS feature of location for cell phones or, where the phone address is listed to owner ?? If they have a phone number they can just look that up in the directory, for address anyways, if they are talking about taking and or listening to phone conversations, that would deffinately be a breach of the 4th amend privacy rules, without probable cause.

Some phones dont have gps but they can be tracked via the carriers to which towers are sending receiving calls in a given area for that phone.

What do cell phones have to do with drug trafficking any ways ?? Anyone doing illegal things and stupid enough to use their own phone for it deserves to be caught anyways. ( Like saying lets do a bank heist and well use are own personal vehicle(s) as the getaway car - lol ).

I mean seriously every phone call is 2 telephone numbers transaction, and those numbers are "KNOWN" whom bought the service number and where its registered and installed to. Each call is timed land or cell as well so you get a bill for it, so every call is already traceable, and where its at.

For cell phones, using gps tower tracking what tower is closest to and sending that cell device a call, is pretty much all the info they can get, and or the GPS part of the phone, if the carrier has access to those phone functions to gps track it, new phones have it older models many dont.

As for listening to phone coversations is a whole different story, that would need to be addresses. As probable casue would be needed then for that privacy rights. If they can just listen to anyones phone calls whenever they want unrestricted, then phone calls also to be used agaist them in court for that with no probable cause, then phones cell or land line would be consider public item not, private, and usage would dramatically change.

More would opt for encrypted voip or other forms if they could tap into you phone call any time they please un warranted, and listen use any conversations against someone in court.

 

eloric

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What happend to the definition of private enterprise? Since when does the government own the phone companies? This evidence won't be used to prove you were someplace, the authorities will use it to hunt you down in real time when they want you.

What really galls me is that the police are climing they have a "reasonable expectation of privacy" and that you can not use the very same phone they can track you with to record them in public.
 

grieve

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Wanna bet they will never retrieve a stolen phone with this simple tracking setup? Why would they want to serve the public....

Seriously though, some phones are $500 - $1000... they can track it and get it back in a few mins, get er done!
 

coolcash1777

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[citation][nom]TommySch[/nom]Grab your guns, they don't have any tracking device embedded.[/citation]

BTW, there is a tracking device on your guns. Its called a registerd serial number, they can track where that gun belongs.
 

thechief73

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If there is a current criminal investigation going on I can understand that they would need to aquire this kind of information. But...

"Americans enjoy no "reasonable expectation of privacy" in their location--or at least in regards to cell phone use."

Who made themselves king and decided this? As many people that now use a cell phone this is country, the Gov. saying we can track a majority of you whenever/wherever we like!

I for one have a VERY REASONABLE! expectation of someone not being able to know my location or where I've been at a whim.

 

Sabiancym

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I don't care how angry you are, how much Fox news tells you it's the end of the world. This is not illegal in any way. It's the same thing as security cameras, same thing as a police stakeout, same exact thing.

Nowhere in the constitution is this prohibited. The only people who are complaining are the conspiracy theorists who think the government is out to get them.

It's not like warrants were hard to come by before hand. They hand them out all the time. All this does is speed up the process.


Just paranoia. I see nothing wrong with it. Calling it a slippery slope is just an excuse to complain about something before anything wrong happens.
 

Sabiancym

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How come when the government tracks people it's wrong, but when massive corporations who have no interest in you except your money have the ability to do it, it's fine?

I'll never understand why people fear a government that they have a say in, but not the corporation that they have absolutely no vote in.
 

bildo123

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Oh noes! Now the feds will know when I'm gonna hang out with my Bro's! Seriously, people front like their personal conversations are so important, get a life, no one really cares.
 

Sabiancym

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[citation][nom]bildo123[/nom]Oh noes! Now the feds will know when I'm gonna hang out with my Bro's! Seriously, people front like their personal conversations are so important, get a life, no one really cares.[/citation]

They aren't monitoring conversations, just tracking locations. Some people don't seem to know the difference.
 

klyndt

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Guys, this case started under the Bush administration. It is this current administrations responsibility to defend the actions of the previous administration even when it is counter to what the current administration wants to do.
 

dimcorner

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[citation][nom]greghome[/nom]Ever considered finland? high speed broadband is a human right there[/citation]

So you ok with about 18% income tax + 15-20% municipality tax + property tax? I also read something about a church tax of 1-2%, but I don't know if that is optional.
 

zaznet

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Data is collected by the mobile carrier and thus the carrier should determine the privacy of such data in accordance with the contracts they provided to their customers. If AT&T tells me I have no privacy and the Government has full access to the data then I am free to go to a carrier that requires a search warrant that targets a specific individual if I so choose.

It is the carrier who protects data about my location and their obligation is within the contract between them and their customer.
 

kezix_69

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Where is this data stored? On your phone? or somewhere in the carriers servers? If it is saved on the phone then someone should come out with an app that clears that data periodically? Why is this data even saved anywhere at all?

The growth in cell phone technology is getting a little scary sometimes lol
 

angelraiter

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[citation][nom]Nightsilver[/nom]I don't do anything wrong or go anywhere I'm ashamed of, so I don't have a problem with this.[/citation]
That's not the point. You have the right to go anywhere without being tracked, its a right. Just like the 5th is a right to not incriminate oneself, you don't necessarily need to exercise all your rights (you may never need to invoke the 5th) but if they start disappearing, you will eventually find yourself in a place where the rights you do exercise don't exist anymore.. It's a matter of living in a free, legal democracy or not, which right now, the US is not (anymore). For example, rights protecting children, you are not a child, but that doesn't mean we don't need to have those rights. Be careful with what the State is doing to your civil liberties, the balance between freedom and a dictatorship is very delicate, subject to shift without notice and very quietly. You may find that this disregard for civil liberties that is going on, will turn into something sad and dangerous and you will only notice it when it's to late.
 

Sabiancym

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[citation][nom]AngelRaiter[/nom]That's not the point. You have the right to go anywhere without being tracked, its a right. Just like the 5th is a right to not incriminate oneself, you don't necessarily need to exercise all your rights (you may never need to invoke the 5th) but if they start disappearing, you will eventually find yourself in a place where the rights you do exercise don't exist anymore.. It's a matter of living in a free, legal democracy or not, which right now, the US is not (anymore). For example, rights protecting children, you are not a child, but that doesn't mean we don't need to have those rights. Be careful with what the State is doing to your civil liberties, the balance between freedom and a dictatorship is very delicate, subject to shift without notice and very quietly. You may find that this disregard for civil liberties that is going on, will turn into something sad and dangerous and you will only notice it when it's to late.[/citation]


You do not have the right to go anywhere without being tracked. I don't know why you think you do. If I'm out walking in public, the police can follow me. There is nothing illegal about them doing so.
 
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