Sears price match ever used successfully for a plasma/HDTV?

Page 2 - Seeking answers? Join the Tom's Guide community: where nearly two million members share solutions and discuss the latest tech.
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Julie" <julie@nospam.com> wrote in message

> Sears actually buys most of their big-ticket items at below-wholesale
prices.
> The catch is that any manufacturers warranty is actually handled by Sears.

Yes, this is what I was also told by the person who told me the "wholesale"
price on my Sony TV. Sears sold it to me for about $100 over this wholesale
price but, being a huge buyer, they almost certainly pay below standard
wholesale.

Which is great! Otherwise, they couldn't sell for such a low price.

Here in Austin, if you buy a Sony set under manufacturers warranty, after
whatever store "satisfaction guarantee" warranty you get, warranty repairs
are handled by one of two or three local TV repair shops, but Sears is not
one of them, or so I was told by a local dealer. If you buy the Sears
extended coverage, then they handle repairs from day one and I imagine get
reimbursed by Sony for warranty-covered repairs.

I normally never buy extended warranties, but I did buy the Sears coverage
for this TV. For $400 / 3 years, they cover everything in-home, including
the lamp. And have a pretty good reputation, as far as I can tell.

mack
austin
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Thanks VERY much for a VERY detailed post. You really should charge people
for this kind of info!
A couple of questions: 1) what do you mean by the 10% discount you keep
referring to? In other words, I thought there is no arguing the
pricematch - 10%.. that is a guarantee. So what is this other 10% you refer
to?

2) The sears.com website says that they do pricematch online retailers:
"If you find a lower price (including shipping, handling and delivery) on an
identical branded item with the same features currently available for sale
and delivery in your area from a local retail store's online site, Sears
will match that total price Plus, give you 10% of the difference"

But I guess this only works if it is a regular local store that happens to
have a website? So some plasma tv online retailer in NYC which has a
showroom there won't work for me if I live in Philadelphia?

3) Here WAS my plan. If you were the salesman in my store (Sears in King
of Prussia, PA-- definitely an "A and B store"), would you allow this?:

a) Print a copy of the order sheet from shopsunshine.com (
http://tinyurl.com/5wgab ) who is advertising a Panasonic 42PD25U plasma tv
for $2249 (Sears price is $2999). This company does have a showroom in
Brooklyn however I live in Philadelphia-- not exactly my "local" retail
store, but it is 3 hours away).

b) Ask sears to pricematch - 10%. Then I would like to pay with a new
Sears card and get an EXTRA 10% off.

c) I live near Delaware which has no sales tax. Can I ask my salesman to
order the tv, get his commission, but have it sent to my neighboring
Delaware Sears for me to pick it up?


Is this all legit? Is there any other tip you recommend? Finally, i don't
want to screw over the salesman, but the Sears extended warranty on this tv
is $500 more than I can pay elsewhere. So will he be really pissed if I
don' t get the warranty or any major accessories?


THANKS AGAIN!!







"HDTV-slingr" <NOSPAMMERS@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:8plrn0hkjgjdls22c7a8ncap0cbmuptj7f@4ax.com...
> On Mon, 25 Oct 2004 21:41:10 GMT, "Verizon User" <anonymous@anon.com>
> wrote:
>
> (Warning, LONG - from a current Sears TV & Audio salesman):
>
> >Has anyone successfully used the Sears Price Match policy for a plasma TV
> >(or other high-priced item?)
>
> In addition to what the other posters have said in response, I can
> give you a few tips & tricks to get your best price on high end
> electronics from Sears.
>
> Technically, we do only pricematch our local competitors and the major
> big-box retailers but there *can be* a bit of leeway here too... see
> below. First off, we salespeople are more than happy to pricematch if
> it's legit. The sooner we ring you up and get back out on the floor,
> the better for us, so by all means, bring us a pricematch opportunity!
> Believe me, if you come up to me with an ad for a thousand dollar
> lower price on a Hitachi plasma, I cannot wait to make you and I both
> smile.
>
> I have no intention of trying to get you to pay more for that
> television. I will try to sell you our protection plan and I will try
> to sell you some good cables and I'll try to get you to spread the
> word about how easy this transaction was but I'll DEFINITELY not try
> to get you out of our price match opportunity.
>
> Now some inside tips.....
>
> First off, outside of price matching I've got 10% to work with (on
> sales over a grand). Not a dime more and that INCLUDES on-sale
> prices. That's ME. Other salespeople on our staff do not. Nobody
> has more than 10% so don't waste your time. So you understand what
> I'm saying, if an item's already 5% off (on sale), the most I can do
> is another 5% off, PERIOD. I cannot compound anything either. In
> other words, if you have a $50 off coupon, I cannot get away with 10%
> off PLUS that $50 coupon.... I'd get fired.
>
> Remember, this is a totally different situation than a legitimate
> price match. Price matching can go on all day long as long as we can
> show a copy of an ad from any local retailer or any national big box.
> Even if it's half price from what we're selling it for. The policy
> is, their price PLUS 10% of the difference, as long as we can show our
> boss in writing.
>
> One time recently, Circuit City had the 46" Samsung DLP on their web
> site for a thousand dollars less than our retail price and I price
> matched it, printed out the page. The boss had checked on my price
> match since it was so huge and it turns out it was a mistake that CC
> had corrected by the time my boss looked at their web site. I got
> called into his office and he was PISSED off, about to fire me. I
> showed him the printed page and we both realized it was just a mistake
> that had quickly been corrected on CC's web site and that was the end
> of the 3rd degree and grilling. The bottom line is, the customer got
> a STEAL.
>
> So anyway, how do you know if you are talking to somebody who has the
> ability to "cut a bit of a deal" (within that 10%)? First off, you
> need to find somebody who's being paid on commission. Not all of us
> are paid commission, it depends upon the Sears store. How do you know
> you are at a store that pays commission? Look at the size of the
> store. Only the A & B stores pay commission. A & B stores are the
> huge ones found generally in the larger metro areas. If there is a
> huge display of TV's, you're in an A or B store.
>
> Now how do you find a salesman who can wheel and deal? This is where
> it gets tricky. In my particular store, if you are a marginal
> salesman or if you cut too many "unauthorized" deals, you can't be
> cutting deals. People who can't sell and people who can't sell
> without cutting deals never last more than about 8 months, so if it
> were me, I'd be asking the salesperson how long they've worked there.
> If the answer is a year or more, the chances are good you are talking
> to somebody who is trusted not to give away the proverbial "farm" and
> who is assumed by management to be doing business in Sears' overall
> best interest.
>
> For example, let me give you some personal examples based upon my own
> in-store experiences. We've got about 10 salespeople in my
> department. Of those 10, about 5 of them are new and about 5 of us
> have been there over a year. Of the 5 of us that have been there over
> a year, nobody says anything if we cut an occasional 5 or 10% deal or
> do zero percent financing when it's not being advertized. The reason
> why is because we rarely do it - maybe on 1 out of 10 sales and
> management has learned to trust our judgement.
>
> Of the other 5, they can't do it, no matter how much you want them to.
> Some have tried it and were written up for it and told they cannot cut
> deals to get a sale. This is how Sears starts us out, probably to
> hammer home the notion that we are NOT to give their money away under
> any circumstances, when the fact is, we are not TRUSTED to do this
> until we've proven ourselves to be able to do it only when it is
> absolutely a last resort (this is an "unwritten rule").
>
> So, if it were *me*, and I were shopping for a TV, I'd be shopping for
> a salesman first. I'd find an A or B store and I'd be asking the
> salesman how long they've worked there. If less than a year, I'd
> leave for a few minutes and come back until I got the answer I wanted
> - over a year. Then I'd just come right out and say, "look, I already
> know the deal, I know somebody who works for Sears. You give me 10%
> off on this set, we can just walk right up to the cash register right
> now".
>
> Expect to be told it is not possible but stand your ground. The
> reason we say this is because the more of these we do, the more we get
> on the proverbial "radar screen". Even the best of us will get fired
> if we cut a 10% deal on even a quarter of our sales. If the salesman
> stands his or her ground on your 10% deal, it's because he or she has
> had a 'talking to" recently, due to an apparent inability to close
> most deals at full retail. In this instance, you have 2 options if
> you want to buy from Sears. Option 1, find another salesman on
> another day or in another A or B store. Option 2, settle for 5%, or
> something that won't put the guy or gal on the radar screen.
>
> I hope this helps :)
>
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Tue, 26 Oct 2004 14:27:26 GMT, "Verizon User" <anonymous@anon.com>
wrote:

>A couple of questions: 1) what do you mean by the 10% discount you keep
>referring to? In other words, I thought there is no arguing the
>pricematch - 10%.. that is a guarantee. So what is this other 10% you refer
>to?

Ok, first off, it's primatch minus 10% of the DIFFERENCE. If a
competitor has a plasma (same model, same brand) for $1,000 less than
Sears, after the pricematch, we beat the competitor by $100 (10% of
the difference).

The other 10% isn't an additional 10%, it's just an every day
thing.... just the leeway I have when making a sale. 10% from the
full retail price. To clarify, I'm just saying even if you don't have
an ad for me to compete with, I personally *could* give you up to 10%
off the full retail price on a big ticket item *IF* you and I hit it
off alright.
>
>2) The sears.com website says that they do pricematch online retailers:
>"If you find a lower price (including shipping, handling and delivery) on an
>identical branded item with the same features currently available for sale
>and delivery in your area from a local retail store's online site, Sears
>will match that total price Plus, give you 10% of the difference"
>
>But I guess this only works if it is a regular local store that happens to
>have a website? So some plasma tv online retailer in NYC which has a
>showroom there won't work for me if I live in Philadelphia?

Exactly. The reason we don't just pricematch any website's offer is
because if I wanted to, in 15 minutes I could put up a website that
has a Hitachi 42" plasma TV for $999, then print out the ad and walk
into any Sears with it and walk out with the TV for $599... ain't
gonna happen.
>
>3) Here WAS my plan. If you were the salesman in my store (Sears in King
>of Prussia, PA-- definitely an "A and B store"), would you allow this?:
>
>a) Print a copy of the order sheet from shopsunshine.com (
>http://tinyurl.com/5wgab ) who is advertising a Panasonic 42PD25U plasma tv
>for $2249 (Sears price is $2999). This company does have a showroom in
>Brooklyn however I live in Philadelphia-- not exactly my "local" retail
>store, but it is 3 hours away).
>
>b) Ask sears to pricematch - 10%. Then I would like to pay with a new
>Sears card and get an EXTRA 10% off.

Ok, if I were your salesman in this instance, I'd try to urge you to
take a drive out there and I'd simply do a store transfer sale so you
could pick up the TV in Brooklyn, where the "local" competitor could
be matched. In this instance, the savings would be well worth a 6 hr.
drive, at least for me.

That extra 10% off using a Sears card thing is over, or if it's not,
it will be any day now. It's just a promotion we do a couple of times
a year. If it's still going on in your area, I'd jump on it quick.
>
>c) I live near Delaware which has no sales tax. Can I ask my salesman to
>order the tv, get his commission, but have it sent to my neighboring
>Delaware Sears for me to pick it up?
>
Yes, as I explained earlier in this post, I can (and often do) sell
TV's all over the US for people. I live in a vacation type area and
we get people from all over the US and they are suprised when I tell
them the TV is waiting for them back home, thousands of miles away.
For example, just a few weeks ago, I had a Toshiba TV delivered and
set up for a resident in NYC who was visiting somebody here on the
Gulf Coast.

The salesman will get his commission regardless of where you want to
pick up the TV.
>
>Is this all legit?

Of course. We're not stealing anything here, we're just trying to be
competitive and earn your biz so as long as it's a legitimate
pricematch or as long as we're within that 10% from full retail area,
nobody's going to get fired and nobody in uniform is going to be
asking you any questions. Now as far as my telling you all this
inside stuff, I'm sure the higher ups wouldn't appreciate me doing it
but I haven't signed any non-disclosure forms either ;-)

>Is there any other tip you recommend?

Be nice to your salesman and if he / she takes good care of you, send
him / her referrals and don't go anywhere else and don't buy from
another salesman in the future. Heck, I even go hook up surround
sound systems for free in my off-time for my loyal customers who send
referrals to me.

>Finally, i don't
>want to screw over the salesman, but the Sears extended warranty on this tv
>is $500 more than I can pay elsewhere. So will he be really pissed if I
>don' t get the warranty or any major accessories?

No, he won't be pissed but he'd surely be bummed out because we do
make a nice commish on accessories and protection agreements ;-)

There is one thing, however; to bear in mind: "Your Satisfaction Is
Guaranteed" at Sears. When your extended is purchased through Sears,
you *always* have that one little trump card to pull out if there are
problems down the road. I won't get into specifics (I've already
given out way too much info) but let's just say I've seen REDICULOUS
hoops jumped through when a customer insistently pulls that little
trump card from their hats ;-)

You've got all the info you need... happy buyin' and best of luck to
ya :)
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

After my Sony HDTV died and I tried to get warranty service, I really see
the value of buying at Sears and just taking the set in for warranty
service.

My advice, even if Sears wants $100 or so more--buy it at Sears,

--Dan

"Verizon User" <anonymous@anon.com> wrote in message
news:Wpefd.3777$uQ4.925@trndny08...
> Has anyone successfully used the Sears Price Match policy for a plasma TV
> (or other high-priced item?)
>
> I want to purchase a Panasonic 42PD25U plasma tv. Sears sells it for
$2999.
>
> Online, i can find it for about 2200. Sears pricematch offers to match
any
> price and give an additional 10% off.
>
> I want to pricematch the tv, get the additional 10% off, use a Sears
credit
> card to get an additional 10% off.
> Of course, I expect to be given some grief in trying to price match.
>
> Has anyone used this successfully?
>
>
>
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"dg" <dan_gus@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:gKxfd.462$zx1.179@newssvr13.news.prodigy.com...
> After my Sony HDTV died and I tried to get warranty service, I really see
> the value of buying at Sears and just taking the set in for warranty
> service.
>
> My advice, even if Sears wants $100 or so more--buy it at Sears,

It's $400 for 3 years.

mack
austin
 

None

Distinguished
Sep 16, 2002
103
0
18,630
0
Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I love buying stuff at Sears. Buy the warranty, they will stand behind it. I
had three 61" TV's replaced cause I didn't like them. Find an online
retailer that does that.
Also, they will price match internet prices. I've had the salesperson go
online with me at the store to check the prices.
I almost bought a 50" Pioneer Plasma at Sears that was disply model and
after 1 day of second guessing myself someone bought it out from under my
nose when I was there. The price was $3600. Can't beat that.
"Mack McKinnon" <MckinnonRemoveThis@tvadmanDeleteThisAsWell.com> wrote in
message news:cVAfd.1819$EI6.878@fe2.texas.rr.com...
> "dg" <dan_gus@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:gKxfd.462$zx1.179@newssvr13.news.prodigy.com...
>> After my Sony HDTV died and I tried to get warranty service, I really see
>> the value of buying at Sears and just taking the set in for warranty
>> service.
>>
>> My advice, even if Sears wants $100 or so more--buy it at Sears,
>
> It's $400 for 3 years.
>
> mack
> austin
>
>
 

THUMPer

Distinguished
Apr 12, 2004
261
0
18,930
0
Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Wed, 27 Oct 2004 02:35:22 GMT, "None" <nowhere@none.net> wrote:


Every Sears store I've been to has the poorest display of TVs. The
signal is hardly viewable.
Thumper
>I love buying stuff at Sears. Buy the warranty, they will stand behind it. I
>had three 61" TV's replaced cause I didn't like them. Find an online
>retailer that does that.
>Also, they will price match internet prices. I've had the salesperson go
>online with me at the store to check the prices.
>I almost bought a 50" Pioneer Plasma at Sears that was disply model and
>after 1 day of second guessing myself someone bought it out from under my
>nose when I was there. The price was $3600. Can't beat that.
>"Mack McKinnon" <MckinnonRemoveThis@tvadmanDeleteThisAsWell.com> wrote in
>message news:cVAfd.1819$EI6.878@fe2.texas.rr.com...
>> "dg" <dan_gus@hotmail.com> wrote in message
>> news:gKxfd.462$zx1.179@newssvr13.news.prodigy.com...
>>> After my Sony HDTV died and I tried to get warranty service, I really see
>>> the value of buying at Sears and just taking the set in for warranty
>>> service.
>>>
>>> My advice, even if Sears wants $100 or so more--buy it at Sears,
>>
>> It's $400 for 3 years.
>>
>> mack
>> austin
>>
>>
>

To reply drop XYZ in address
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Wed, 27 Oct 2004 11:10:18 GMT, Thumper <jaylsmithXYZ@comcast.net>
wrote:

>Every Sears store I've been to has the poorest display of TVs. The
>signal is hardly viewable.

I don't know what the deal is with the poor signals you've seen but I
can tell you in the store I work at, the lighting is horrible. Our
television display area looks like a big, carpeted gymnasium with
bright, flourescent lighting beating directly down upon one of the
largest high-end TV assortments in the state... too bright a room for
selling pillows, much less TV's. I really wish they'd do something
about that.
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Thumper" <jaylsmithXYZ@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:je0vn05l0v7s4e9jr9f4sk0g4nrj27rfha@4ax.com...
> On Wed, 27 Oct 2004 02:35:22 GMT, "None" <nowhere@none.net> wrote:
>
>
> Every Sears store I've been to has the poorest display of TVs. The
> signal is hardly viewable.
> Thumper

I looked at TV's in two Sears stores in the Austin area. One TV department,
in a smaller Sears store, was inadequate but the other was excellent --
large, with an excellent selection of the latest models. The signal on the
TV's in both stores was fine. I can't imagine that there is a problem with
the cable signal that would be pervasive through Sears stores but not other
stores.

I think the problem you observed is probably ubiquitous. There are many
variables to be set via menus in these new HDTV's and the factory defaults
may not be optimum. For example, my TV came from the factory with the
picture set to "Vivid" (ugly) and "Live Color" set to "high" (makes the
white areas swim). A salesperson in any store would have to be aware of
this sort of thing in order to re-program the menus so the TV displays look
good. I doubt this is always the case. And I am sure that customers,
messing with the display models, constantly throw them off.


mack
austin
 

THUMPer

Distinguished
Apr 12, 2004
261
0
18,930
0
Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Wed, 27 Oct 2004 10:38:27 -0500, HDTV-slingr
<NOSPAMMERS@hotmail.com> wrote:

>On Wed, 27 Oct 2004 11:10:18 GMT, Thumper <jaylsmithXYZ@comcast.net>
>wrote:
>
>>Every Sears store I've been to has the poorest display of TVs. The
>>signal is hardly viewable.
>
>I don't know what the deal is with the poor signals you've seen but I
>can tell you in the store I work at, the lighting is horrible. Our
>television display area looks like a big, carpeted gymnasium with
>bright, flourescent lighting beating directly down upon one of the
>largest high-end TV assortments in the state... too bright a room for
>selling pillows, much less TV's. I really wish they'd do something
>about that.
>
>
There really isn't any excuse for a poor display no matter what the
problem. Circuit City has every one of over one hundred TVs in heir
store adjusted properly and fed with a beautiful signal. I walk into
Sears and feel like challenging the store manager to a contest. Give
me a few grand to fix their layout and display and I'll guarantee I'll
double their sales in a couple of months. It seems they just aren't
interested in selling TVs around here.
Thumper
To reply drop XYZ in address
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Wed, 27 Oct 2004 18:33:54 GMT, Thumper <jaylsmithXYZ@comcast.net>
wrote:

>>
>There really isn't any excuse for a poor display no matter what the
>problem. Circuit City has every one of over one hundred TVs in heir
>store adjusted properly and fed with a beautiful signal. I walk into
>Sears and feel like challenging the store manager to a contest. Give
>me a few grand to fix their layout and display and I'll guarantee I'll
>double their sales in a couple of months. It seems they just aren't
>interested in selling TVs around here.
>Thumper

I hear you loudly and clearly, Thumper and I totally agree with you.
We salespeople are always trying to keep our signal strong and clear
on the high def's but bad splitters, out-of-aim dishes, etc., etc.,
are a constant battle for us. This, along with the HORRIBLE lighting,
lack of advertising brilliance (i.e., check out the kick-assed CC and
BB commercials then check out the latest Sears commercials) is, in my
own opinion, the ONLY reason we are not #1 in the HDTV industry.

Imagine being a salesman at this place. You've got a bad Dish signal
coming into a georgeous HDTV, which is sitting directly under a
flourescent light and you are trying to explain to the customer how
much better this TV will look in their own home. I've literally sent
customers to CC to see certain TV's demoed under the proper lighting,
with a good, clear signal and have been thrilled to see most of them
come back to buy from me.

This is not to say we've always got a bad signal, we don't. I'm sure
CC and BB have their share of times when their dishes are out of aim
(we're in hurricane alley here) too. But the LIGHTING problem is
totally inexcusable.

I agree that Sears is FAR from perfect but again, to be fair, Sears
also has it's good points too. The fact that every store refuses to
be undersold by any competitor in their area combined with the fact
that they do perform any and all warranty work (and for the most part,
quite competently) STILL makes Sears a great place to buy from in the
end.

Please DO give the managers at your local store hell about your
complaints.... don't hold back. I'm one of those guys who'd love to
see Sears pull it's collective head out of their butts in the areas
you've complained here about but they'll listen to you over we lowly
salespeople any day of the week.
 

dizzy

Distinguished
Sep 11, 2003
88
0
18,580
0
Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Wed, 27 Oct 2004 18:33:54 GMT, Thumper <jaylsmithXYZ@comcast.net>
wrote:

>There really isn't any excuse for a poor display no matter what the
>problem. Circuit City has every one of over one hundred TVs in heir
>store adjusted properly and fed with a beautiful signal. I walk into
>Sears and feel like challenging the store manager to a contest. Give
>me a few grand to fix their layout and display and I'll guarantee I'll
>double their sales in a couple of months. It seems they just aren't
>interested in selling TVs around here.

There's a lot of stupid, lazy people in the world, no doubt.
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

HDTV-slingr <NOSPAMMERS@hotmail.com> wrote in message news:<aqr0o0llapn1dcbj6ddk7t90u501rmk4to@4ax.com>...
> On Wed, 27 Oct 2004 18:33:54 GMT, Thumper <jaylsmithXYZ@comcast.net>
> wrote:
>
> >>
> >There really isn't any excuse for a poor display no matter what the
> >problem. Circuit City has every one of over one hundred TVs in heir
> >store adjusted properly and fed with a beautiful signal. I walk into
> >Sears and feel like challenging the store manager to a contest. Give
> >me a few grand to fix their layout and display and I'll guarantee I'll
> >double their sales in a couple of months. It seems they just aren't
> >interested in selling TVs around here.
> >Thumper
>
> I hear you loudly and clearly, Thumper and I totally agree with you.
> We salespeople are always trying to keep our signal strong and clear
> on the high def's but bad splitters, out-of-aim dishes, etc., etc.,
> are a constant battle for us. This, along with the HORRIBLE lighting,
> lack of advertising brilliance (i.e., check out the kick-assed CC and
> BB commercials then check out the latest Sears commercials) is, in my
> own opinion, the ONLY reason we are not #1 in the HDTV industry.
>
> Imagine being a salesman at this place. You've got a bad Dish signal
> coming into a georgeous HDTV, which is sitting directly under a
> flourescent light and you are trying to explain to the customer how
> much better this TV will look in their own home. I've literally sent
> customers to CC to see certain TV's demoed under the proper lighting,
> with a good, clear signal and have been thrilled to see most of them
> come back to buy from me.
>
> This is not to say we've always got a bad signal, we don't. I'm sure
> CC and BB have their share of times when their dishes are out of aim
> (we're in hurricane alley here) too. But the LIGHTING problem is
> totally inexcusable.
>
> I agree that Sears is FAR from perfect but again, to be fair, Sears
> also has it's good points too. The fact that every store refuses to
> be undersold by any competitor in their area combined with the fact
> that they do perform any and all warranty work (and for the most part,
> quite competently) STILL makes Sears a great place to buy from in the
> end.
>
that's a good point-it definitely seems like they've been making great
strides in the home improvement area recently too.
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

About 14 months ago, I purchased my Panasonic 42" EDTV at Sears
utilizing the price match. I believe Sears' price at the time was $4499
(MSRP at most large retailers) and I found an internet deal for $2999. I
simply brought the printout from shopping.com showing the lowest price.
Including the price match + 10% off and another 10% off for opening a
Sears card, I walked away with this plasma for $2600, which is less
than what most places still charge NOW.


--
acousticbiker
------------------------------------------------------------------------
This message was posted via http://www.satelliteguys.us by acousticbiker
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I walked into a Sears store here in Austin with a quoted price of $3699 on a
Sony KDF-60XS955 RP HDTV, when Sony was still first shipping them and most
stores, including Sears, had them for well over $4000. I did not even have
the quote -- from a local appliance store -- in writing, just verbal. Sears
matched it, plus $50. Came to $3650. On delivery day, they didn't have the
TV. Because they were 4 days late delivering, they knocked off another
$400. End price: $3250.

mack
austin


"acousticbiker" <acousticbiker.1ioggw@satelliteguys.us> wrote in message
news:acousticbiker.1ioggw@satelliteguys.us...
>
> About 14 months ago, I purchased my Panasonic 42" EDTV at Sears
> utilizing the price match. I believe Sears' price at the time was $4499
> (MSRP at most large retailers) and I found an internet deal for $2999. I
> simply brought the printout from shopping.com showing the lowest price.
> Including the price match + 10% off and another 10% off for opening a
> Sears card, I walked away with this plasma for $2600, which is less
> than what most places still charge NOW.
>
>
> --
> acousticbiker
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> This message was posted via http://www.satelliteguys.us by acousticbiker
>
 
Thread starter Similar threads Forum Replies Date
Z Streaming Video & TVs 1
G Streaming Video & TVs 1
S Streaming Video & TVs 6
D Streaming Video & TVs 2
O Streaming Video & TVs 2
P Streaming Video & TVs 3
sorryboi Streaming Video & TVs 3
X Streaming Video & TVs 10
D Streaming Video & TVs 1
K Streaming Video & TVs 1
N Streaming Video & TVs 3
N3rdR4ge Streaming Video & TVs 4
S Streaming Video & TVs 1
T Streaming Video & TVs 3
Y Streaming Video & TVs 1
G Streaming Video & TVs 1
exfileme Streaming Video & TVs 7
exfileme Streaming Video & TVs 27
G Streaming Video & TVs 1
G Streaming Video & TVs 16

ASK THE COMMUNITY