using AV receiver in countries with different voltage

jclayyy

Commendable
Nov 23, 2016
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Hi all,

A couple of questions about a Denon 5.1 receiver (AVRX 520B) I bought in the UK to bring back with me to Brazil (a nightmare to pack into my baggage, but import costs are so high here it was worth the hassle!). Before I get everything set up I want to make sure I don't risk damaging the receiver due to different voltages in the UK (220V) and Brazil (120V).

The receiver specs say it is for 220V, but I'm not sure how to interpret that... what do you think could happen if I plug it in to a 120V plug socket?

Would it...
(A) just not turn on?
(B) work but with less power (producing lower volume audio)?
(C) explode and leave me crying?
(D) be all cool?

And if the answer is any of options (A) to (C), how can I solve this? Would a voltage transformer do the trick?
 

PhysX_HW

Estimable
Sep 23, 2015
8
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4,520
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If it's this one, then it should work fine with a simple 110/120V to 220/240V transformer, just make sure that the transformer can actually output at least 350W.

The 50/60Hz difference doesn't matter, as this doesn't use the AC directly anywhere in the circuitry, and the bridge rectifier works just fine with either frequencies. If you had the tools and knowledge, you might be able to actually modify the transistor, so it would work with a 100-120V input, but unless you know what you are doing, I wouldn't recommend that.
 

little_me

Estimable
May 9, 2015
151
3
4,910
59
it is more likely choice B, except that the frequency is 50hz in UK and 60 in Brazil, if the power supply inside wont support that, it couldend up with C
Voltage transformer would fix the voltage but not frequency. Frequency/voltage transformers will cost your limbs. (1000+ usd) so... that is not the way to go.

Of course, since it likely has a switching power supply to change the AC to DC, it doesn't really care about frequency and will work just fine.
 

madmatt30

Honorable
Without a doubt it will be att best scenario A.
I wouldnt even plug it into the socket

Denon do not use switching supplies in their any of their products,they use differnt supplies depending on the marketing/sales area.

You are 100% going to need a step up transformer to run that reciever mate unfortunately.
 
I sometimes call those things boat anchor, should had ask the question b4r all that hassle.

1. I wouldn't even plug it in. If you feel like gambling, I gamble on A.
2. Buying the proper step-up transformer for it is probably prohibitively expensive and aesthetically huge.
3. If you a DIYer, can attempt to replace the internal transformer but of course you have to know what are the required secondary voltages.
 

PhysX_HW

Estimable
Sep 23, 2015
8
0
4,520
4
If it's this one, then it should work fine with a simple 110/120V to 220/240V transformer, just make sure that the transformer can actually output at least 350W.

The 50/60Hz difference doesn't matter, as this doesn't use the AC directly anywhere in the circuitry, and the bridge rectifier works just fine with either frequencies. If you had the tools and knowledge, you might be able to actually modify the transistor, so it would work with a 100-120V input, but unless you know what you are doing, I wouldn't recommend that.
 

jclayyy

Commendable
Nov 23, 2016
13
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1,560
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UPDATE: I’ve picked up a voltage transformer and a surge protector, so I reckon I might be good to go... anything else you guys think I need to consider before I fire it up, or will that be enough??

A couple of you mentioned a step up transformer... is that the same thing? If not, could you point me in the direction of the kind of thing you mean?


 

madmatt30

Honorable
110/120 to 220/230/240 is a step UK transformer mate.
The other way is a step down transformer.
Then there are autos that work both ways (very expensive)

As long as the transformer does 220-240v 3amp (minimum 350w really) you should be good.ifnin doubt let us know the model you've bought??
 

jclayyy

Commendable
Nov 23, 2016
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1,560
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Ok, nice one. The one I bought works both ways (couldn't find just a step up, and luckily it wasnt too expensive). It's only 120W though so I'm going to head back and exchange it for a more powerful one.




 
Some makers don't tell you that the receivers are multi-voltage. The Denon has a standard IEC two prong ac cord jack on the back so you could try using it without the transformer. Most likely it just won't come on at all but it probably won't be hurt by low voltage. High voltage, the reverse, might be fireworks.
 

jclayyy

Commendable
Nov 23, 2016
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Thanks for your help everyone, with a voltage receiver and a surge protector it's working great.
Still kind of curious about what would happen if I tried without, but I'm not taking that risk!


 

madmatt30

Honorable
^ at a guess it wouldn't switch on at all due to the safety circuitry built into the psu, a click & a red light at best.
If it did switch on & work (still not likely because I'd trust denon to use protection inside a fairly high end unit) it word run until you pushed the volume past a certain point , raising the required wattage , the PSU would either overheat & cutout or blow.

Like you say though , why try it ?? ;-)

Nice amp though , a little jealous.
 
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