VR and Flight Simulators

Skoonj

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Mar 21, 2015
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OK, I'm in a tiny minority on VR. I don't play any games, surely first person shooters. All I think I want VR for is to go with high lever fighter flight simulations. The one I have is Falcon BMS 4.33. It will be a while till I can afford the rest of a system that can incorporate both the sim and a really good VR system. Question: How close is VR to being good for the kind of ffighter flight sim I have in mind for it? Or is the answer ... never?
 

Eximo

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Well, the more recent VR headsets require software to be written for them. The best a VR headset can do for off the shelf games is provide a full field of vision. Head tracking and such won't work.

There are some add-on software available, and some flight sims do support VR headset APIs. Basically you'll want to look at your desired titles and see if they support Gear VR or Oculus or one of the others.
 

Skoonj

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Mar 21, 2015
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Skoonj

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Mar 21, 2015
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I just checked with the blog for BMS 4.33. They have people working to make VR work for that system, and have had varying results. It doesn't appear that BMS has a native VR software.

BMS 4.33 is a downloadable flight sim for the F-16 Falcon. You need Falcon 4.0 (doesn't need to be uploaded), and you can download all the software for free. It just needs the F4.0 disk in your computer, and you are good to go. Right now I can't take full advantage of it, since I just have a laptop. This thing deserves a full-up gaming desk top. I do have Thrustmaster HOTAS stick and rudder (F-16 version), and an F16 rudder pedal. Naturally, all that equipment would be far better with a REAL computer!

Thank you for your answer. Eventually BMS will determine which is the best VR solution and design software for it. That time has not yet arrived.
 

Tri23

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May 31, 2016
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I once interviewed for a company that develops simulators for the military for vehicle training. They were using 3 monitor setups and physical consoles. the Dk2 was released at the time, and I asked the guy what research they were doing in the regards to research with VR HMD's. They guy (president) just looked at me blankly when I went on to discuss leap motion, cave systems, tracking, etc..

Main point being, I didn't get the job, but there are certainly people building flight sims, and other types of sims for government and corporations.

Second point being, that guy was an idiot, and his company is going to be destroyed by indie unity developers who can develop entire customization training simulators with motion tracking which will be cheaper, better quality, and more portable than giant ass trailers.

Not directly related.. but I'm still a bit salty about that. :p
 

Eximo

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Herald
Now you are getting into territory I can discuss at length. I happen to have a family member in the business of making flight simulators.

Depending on the simulator effect you are going for headsets may be undesirable. Military systems tend to have as much as possible be real equipment or equivalents. Even going to the extreme of modifying actual displays and sensors to accept direct input from the simulator's computer rather then using replacement panels or instruments. Most military trainers I have seen have trainees wearing most of their gear, including IR gear sometimes.

Low end simulators are more like computer games with realistic controls, and that is perfectly okay. You want people to learn the basics on something simple, and they are easily configurable to support multiple aircraft/vehicles. Since they get the most wear and tear, the cheaper the better, which would make a decent use case for off the shelf VR sets.

The high end stuff is less configurable and geared toward specific vehicles. Usually incorporating as much of the actual cockpit, or an exact copy of its shape, as possible. Motion bases, projector domes, etc.
 

Skoonj

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