Wrong charger for my laptop.

pikardo

Honorable
Dec 28, 2012
2
0
10,510
0
So this may be a simple question but I'm only expecting a simple answer.

I had gotten an HP probook 4530s from a friends mom, whom I helped move. Anyways she said it was broken and figured I knew some about tech things and gave it to me for free. No charger no nothing.
I'm not going to complain but because I had no charger I tried using the one for my Dell and it worked but the laptop says no battery detected.
After I saw that I tried to get more information from them asking what was wrong with the computer and they said it was the keyboard and it was slow. The keyboard works fine and it is very slow but very full of stuff.

Anyways, they said nothing was wrong with the battery for them so is it my fault for using the wrong charger. Did I zap something so to speak or is the charger just not right to charge it

Dell Charger 19.5V, 3.34A, 65W
Not sure what charger I should use for the HP but replacement ones are
HP ProBook 18.5V, 3.5A, 65W
http://www.amazon.com/Original-Adapter-Charger-HP-ProBook/dp/B009SG71MC/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1374251349&sr=8-1&keywords=probook+4530s+charger
 

RetiredChief

Distinguished
Feb 22, 2007
465
0
19,010
40
Would tend to aggree.
The diff in output is mock-nicks as the "charging" circuit is in the laptop. The voltage of the battery is much less, ie if li-ion probably around 10->11 volts. The internal charging circuit then nocks the input down to what the battery uses - if anything the 19.5 V in would allow the charger ciruit to work Less to provide the charging voltage/current.

Only caustion would be to ensure the plug is the correct size - Fit check checks the output diameter - But need to verify the center is also the correct diameter.

Polarity - general standard, outside neg, center Positive.

ON batteries (Since it was probably stored with battery installed for a prolong period of time:
If this is a Li-ion battery, if the cell voltages drop below a set value, it trips an internal circuit and can NOT be recharge - From what I undersand a spealized charger is required. Reason for this is that Li-ion batteries can cause fire hazzard when charging current exceeds rated value.

In the case of Ni batteries if they are discharged below 1 Volt per cell - Generally bye-bye battery. Have recovered, by momentarily applying a much higher voltage, ie about 30V directly to contacts of a 12V Ni battery
 

pikardo

Honorable
Dec 28, 2012
2
0
10,510
0


This sounds like a legit answer so I will look into this. Do you know where I could find a special charger like you have said?
 

RetiredChief

Distinguished
Feb 22, 2007
465
0
19,010
40
No, I found out about this "Feature" while googling Li-ion batteries. will see if I can find a reference.

So far No luck, just that
1) Even if unused, ie sitting on a shelf, they are only good for 2 to 3 years. - Based on this the "life" may have been used up.
2) They discharge just sitting (due to the control circuits inside the battery pack) and one of the circuits opens when the voltage drops below a set point. May be two circuits One that powers off at a set point and a 2nd circuit that disables battery below a lower set point. It is probably this 2nd circuit that has to be reset to allow the pac to charge - my guess.

http://electronics.howstuffworks.com/everyday-tech/lithium-ion-battery.htm
also good info:
http://forum.xda-developers.com/showthread.php?t=1168036
 

TRENDING THREADS