Are sound absorbtion panels a problem when....

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....I've got monitors aimed right at them? Here's the set up: A 12'(w)
x 25'(l) x 14'(h--*arched ceiling) room with Event TR6 monitors on a
desk at seated-head level 10' in front of the non-reinforced, solid,
probably aluminum double door. The doors themselves are ~6.5' X 5' and
in the center of the wall they're on. So there'll be some bare wall on
either side of the door, and the rest of the room has scattered
diffusers but no absorbers. Would absorbtion material of any kind on
the door seriously hamper the listening enivornment, or will the
difference be insignificant? Given that the monitors are near-field
and we must pad the door, we have no choice, I'd say with the right
material it'd be manageable. I'd like to hear the boards sagely
advice....
 
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Marcel,

> I'd like to hear the boards sagely advice. <

Start with the Acoustics FAQ, second in the list on my Articles page:

www.ethanwiner.com/articles.html

You may also find the article "How to set up a room" useful:

http://www.realtraps.com/art_room-setup.htm

--Ethan
 
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In article <1104123916.111284.111330@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com>,
<marcel.graf@gmail.com> wrote:
>...I've got monitors aimed right at them? Here's the set up: A 12'(w)
>x 25'(l) x 14'(h--*arched ceiling) room with Event TR6 monitors on a
>desk at seated-head level 10' in front of the non-reinforced, solid,
>probably aluminum double door. The doors themselves are ~6.5' X 5' and
>in the center of the wall they're on. So there'll be some bare wall on
>either side of the door, and the rest of the room has scattered
>diffusers but no absorbers. Would absorbtion material of any kind on
>the door seriously hamper the listening enivornment, or will the
>difference be insignificant? Given that the monitors are near-field
>and we must pad the door, we have no choice, I'd say with the right
>material it'd be manageable. I'd like to hear the boards sagely
>advice....


This is what absorption is _for_. It prevents direct reflections off of
angular surfaces.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
 
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Right, but my primary goal is to block sound leakage through the door.
So my question is what material/gizmo would keep the most sound from
leaking out of the room while at the same time reflecting some back in
a nice, pretty distribution? This material must be compact,
lightweight, able to block at least some bass freq's and somewhat
inexpensive. I read some of your articles Ethan, and while they were
chock full of useful information I didn't feel like they directly
addressed my question.
 
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You could stick 1/2 Homasote (available in fireproof - recommended)
onto both sides of the door. Frame with quarter round. It will give
you some of the mass you need without making the door weigh a ton.

On 29 Dec 2004 13:38:35 -0800, marcel.graf@gmail.com wrote:

>Right, but my primary goal is to block sound leakage through the door.
>So my question is what material/gizmo would keep the most sound from
>leaking out of the room while at the same time reflecting some back in
>a nice, pretty distribution? This material must be compact,
>lightweight, able to block at least some bass freq's and somewhat
>inexpensive. I read some of your articles Ethan, and while they were
>chock full of useful information I didn't feel like they directly
>addressed my question.
>

Willie K. Yee, M.D. http://users.bestweb.net/~wkyee
Developer of Problem Knowledge Couplers for Psychiatry http://www.pkc.com
Webmaster and Guitarist for the Big Blue Big Band http://www.bigbluebigband.org
 
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>From: marcel.graf@gmail.com
>Date: 12/29/04 4:38 P.M. Eastern Standard Time
>Message-id: <1104356315.217273.129140@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com>
>
>Right, but my primary goal is to block sound leakage through the door.
>So my question is what material/gizmo would keep the most sound from
>leaking out of the room while at the same time reflecting some back in
>a nice, pretty distribution? This material must be compact,
>lightweight, able to block at least some bass freq's and somewhat
>inexpensive. I read some of your articles Ethan, and while they were
>chock full of useful information I didn't feel like they directly
>addressed my question.
>
>

I've heard that using an outside door in place of regular indoor door can be
quite helpful with blocking sound from passing from one room to the next.
Outside doors are better sealed then an inside door was the main reason I
believe.
 
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"Raymond" <bruwhaha58097238@aol.com> wrote in message
news:20041231160301.06731.00001858@mb-m24.aol.com...

> I've heard that using an outside door in place of regular indoor door can
> be
> quite helpful with blocking sound from passing from one room to the next.
> Outside doors are better sealed then an inside door was the main reason I
> believe.

Exterior doors are usually solid, while interior doors are usually hollow
(note the use of the word "usually", you can find interior doors that are
solid - I've never seen an exterior door that's hollow, however, but it's
possible someone makes 'em... maybe hollow metal ones for industrial use).
In any event, here's a cheap solution that a friend of mine used: get a
piece of 3" or 4" standard upholstery foam cut to the inside dimensions of
the doorjamb, use a few dots of liquid nails or construction adhesive to
fasten it to the inside of the door while it's closed (so it lines up
right - don't forget to cut a chunk out for the doorknob); then after that
dries, cover it with some nice fabric, colored in a complimentary fashion to
the rest of your decor, using some fairly flat-headed upholstery nails
around the perimeter. Hollow door, thick foam (heavier per square foot than
O-C 703) = instant bass trap. Perfect? No. Extremely effective? Yes.

Neil Henderson

>
>
 
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<< You could stick 1/2 Homasote (available in fireproof - recommended)
onto both sides of the door. Frame with quarter round. It will give
you some of the mass you need without making the door weigh a ton. >>



The fact that Homasote doesn't weigh a ton also indicates that it doesn't have
enough mass to do much for sound transmission loss. Beefing up the jambs will
probably do as much. The jambs used on interior house doors are practically
worthless as sound seals. Replace them with 1x3 with a closed cell neoprene
gasket pressed into mild compression when the door is closed. And a bottom
gasket is essential too. The type that is an aluminum channel with a gasket
comprising a number of rubber 'fingers' that sweep the floor does a pretty good
job.
I'd still like to hear if anybody has done anything using backer board as an
alternative to wall board for high density STL applications.

Scott Fraser
 
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>Beefing up the jambs willprobably do as much. The jambs used on interior
>house doors are practicallyworthless as sound seals.

It's also worthwile to remove the trim around the door frame. Typically
sheetrock is installed prior to hanging doors. Enough space is left to shim
the door frame until it's level and square. Hanging the doors first and having
the sheetrockers cut it as tight as possible will go a long way to improving
STL. Most doors aren't hung that way, however, and sealing the gap between
where the sheetrock ends and the door frame starts will do as much or more than
replacing the door.


Joe Egan
EMP
Colchester, VT
www.eganmedia.com
 
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marcel.graf@gmail.com wrote:
> Right, but my primary goal is to block sound leakage through the
door.
> So my question is what material/gizmo would keep the most sound from
> leaking out of the room while at the same time reflecting some back
in
> a nice, pretty distribution? This material must be compact,
> lightweight, able to block at least some bass freq's and somewhat
> inexpensive. I read some of your articles Ethan, and while they
were
> chock full of useful information I didn't feel like they directly
> addressed my question.

In your situation I might set up the room so that the door you
want to deaden was in front of you - behind the speakers. I still
have found in practice I like it to be a bit deader behind my speakers
and more diffuse behind my listening position, and the speakers would
be facing away from the door too, for what that is worth.

Anyway, besides adding mass and/or absorbtion to the door and
taking care of leakage/tight seals, perhaps you can create a soundlock.
Adding a second door down the hall or at the top of the stairs
(depending) is a very efficient way to reduce sound transmission. You
would want to also add broadband absorption to some surfaces of the
airspace between the doors. But if that isn't a possibility, if your
current doors open out you might build a heavy frame a few inches
inside the room for a second door that opens in.

In a New York City apartment space my brother & I once made a
soundlock by framing out a box to surround the inside of a corner
doorway opening, and we put a second, heavy 4" thick oversize door we
built and stuffed with sand treated acoustic fiberglass on the inside
(with _HEAVY_ handles). This sacrificed a 4 1/2 x 5 foot square of
floorspace in the corner of the room, but it did substantially reduce
leakage into the hall - thus reducing complaints from the neighbors.
It was attached at the ceiling and inside walls to a shell inside the
room we built on rubber pucks - a room within a room. That was some
project and a major pain, but we did it for only about $750 in 1988
dollars and the room blocked off street noise well enough that we could
record acoustic guitars and hand percussion instruments.

Will Miho
NY Music & TV Audio Guy
Staff Audio / Fox News Channel / M-AES
"The large print giveth and the small print taketh away..." Tom Waits
 
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