Can I change my sound card sample rate to 432 hz

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evilfreakBG

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Feb 14, 2017
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Hello Community!
I recently started to listen 432 hz songs on my phone and Its amazing how they relax my body. (you should try it). Now Im wondering is there a way to change the sample rate of my sound card to 43200 not to be 44100 ? I will appreciate If you can help me!
 
This is a common misconception about how digital sampling works. The analog waveform produced by sampling at 44.1 kHz and 43.2 kHz are identical, except the 44.1 kHz waveform contains some slightly higher frequencies in the 21.6-22.05 kHz range. As those frequencies are beyond what any human can hear (except maybe some newborn babies), the two analog waveforms will sound identical.

People make this mistake because they think digital means the waveform is a stairstep pattern. And since a stairstep looks very different from a smooth analog waveform, it must sound different. But it is not a stairstep. it is a series of infinitely-short samples at intervals in time. When you convert that digital sound sample back to analog, there is mathematically only one smooth analog waveform (within the frequency limit) which passes through all the infinitely-short measured digital samples. And the analog sound waveform the digital sample produces is identical to the original analog waveform.

This is a rather long video, but it explains it graphically, and demonstrates it using real digital sampling equipment and an analog oscilloscope. (The A/D and D/A part is the first 9 minutes of the video.)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cIQ9IXSUzuM
 

kanewolf

Splendid
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Your description should be 43.2Khz. 432hz sampling would only be able to resolve sounds below 200hz ....
If you are playing, the media will determine the sample rate. If you are recording, you might be able to sample at that frequency, but since it is non-standard, I don't know.

But a quick google, says what you really want to do is pitch change so that a 440Hz note is 432Hz. That may be able to be done in playback software.
 
This is a common misconception about how digital sampling works. The analog waveform produced by sampling at 44.1 kHz and 43.2 kHz are identical, except the 44.1 kHz waveform contains some slightly higher frequencies in the 21.6-22.05 kHz range. As those frequencies are beyond what any human can hear (except maybe some newborn babies), the two analog waveforms will sound identical.

People make this mistake because they think digital means the waveform is a stairstep pattern. And since a stairstep looks very different from a smooth analog waveform, it must sound different. But it is not a stairstep. it is a series of infinitely-short samples at intervals in time. When you convert that digital sound sample back to analog, there is mathematically only one smooth analog waveform (within the frequency limit) which passes through all the infinitely-short measured digital samples. And the analog sound waveform the digital sample produces is identical to the original analog waveform.

This is a rather long video, but it explains it graphically, and demonstrates it using real digital sampling equipment and an analog oscilloscope. (The A/D and D/A part is the first 9 minutes of the video.)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cIQ9IXSUzuM
 
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