Connecting DAT to mac

fabrice

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Hi,

i was just wondering if anyone knows if it's possible to connect a DAT
recorder to a mac running os x. since i'm trying to do a bit of
location sound recording for film, but would also like to be able to
record sounds and manipulate them for post production, i'm just trying
to figure out what would be the best recorder to get. if anyone can
let me know how i'd go about transferring from DAT to mac, then that'd
be great, like what equipment i might need, and if i'd lose any
quality through doing so, then i'd be very grateful

thanks

fabrice
 

Chris

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Fabrice wrote:
> Hi,
>
> i was just wondering if anyone knows if it's possible to connect a DAT
> recorder to a mac running os x. since i'm trying to do a bit of
> location sound recording for film, but would also like to be able to
> record sounds and manipulate them for post production, i'm just trying
> to figure out what would be the best recorder to get. if anyone can
> let me know how i'd go about transferring from DAT to mac, then that'd
> be great, like what equipment i might need, and if i'd lose any
> quality through doing so, then i'd be very grateful
>
> thanks
>
> fabrice


If you don't need 48MHz, Sony's Hi-MD can do Linear PCM at 44.1MHz. It
can hold 1hr 34min on a single 1GB MD disc. The sound track can then be
transfered to the PC via USB connection. It's rather slow but doesn't
have the hassle of real-time recording like the old MD or DAT. Sony has
just released a conversion tool to save the recorded track to WAVE.
There is a catch, however, the Sony software is for Windows only.

If you opt to get a DAT, you would need a sound card with digital
optical/coxial audio in. I think a new G5 desktop has the optical port
but I am not sure. There are also digital audio to USB external box. I
think you can check MidiMan.com to find the right stuff for your Mac.
 

Troy

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The G5 has the optical in and out so it should work if you have a G5.I
haven't tried it with mine yet.




chris <someone@somewhere.net> wrote in message
news:kqLCd.865$W32.551@newsread3.news.atl.earthlink.net...
> Fabrice wrote:
> > Hi,
> >
> > i was just wondering if anyone knows if it's possible to connect a DAT
> > recorder to a mac running os x. since i'm trying to do a bit of
> > location sound recording for film, but would also like to be able to
> > record sounds and manipulate them for post production, i'm just trying
> > to figure out what would be the best recorder to get. if anyone can
> > let me know how i'd go about transferring from DAT to mac, then that'd
> > be great, like what equipment i might need, and if i'd lose any
> > quality through doing so, then i'd be very grateful
> >
> > thanks
> >
> > fabrice
>
>
> If you don't need 48MHz, Sony's Hi-MD can do Linear PCM at 44.1MHz. It
> can hold 1hr 34min on a single 1GB MD disc. The sound track can then be
> transfered to the PC via USB connection. It's rather slow but doesn't
> have the hassle of real-time recording like the old MD or DAT. Sony has
> just released a conversion tool to save the recorded track to WAVE.
> There is a catch, however, the Sony software is for Windows only.
>
> If you opt to get a DAT, you would need a sound card with digital
> optical/coxial audio in. I think a new G5 desktop has the optical port
> but I am not sure. There are also digital audio to USB external box. I
> think you can check MidiMan.com to find the right stuff for your Mac.
 
G

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get a dat with spdif out
metric halo ULN2 is a good audio interface for the mac
has spdif I/O , high quality audio, excellent A/D/A and can be used for
monitoring during post.

dale
 
G

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Fabrice <fabricegalli@iprimus.com.au> wrote:
>
>i was just wondering if anyone knows if it's possible to connect a DAT
>recorder to a mac running os x. since i'm trying to do a bit of
>location sound recording for film, but would also like to be able to
>record sounds and manipulate them for post production, i'm just trying
>to figure out what would be the best recorder to get. if anyone can
>let me know how i'd go about transferring from DAT to mac, then that'd
>be great, like what equipment i might need, and if i'd lose any
>quality through doing so, then i'd be very grateful

Sure, you can get an S-PDIF input for the Mac on a variety of cards. The
transfer is realtime only, but I don't see any problem with that.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
 
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Fabrice <fabricegalli@iprimus.com.au> wrote:

> ...i'm just trying
>to figure out what would be the best recorder to get. if anyone can
>let me know how i'd go about transferring from DAT to mac, then that'd
>be great, like what equipment i might need, and if i'd lose any
>quality through doing so, then i'd be very grateful

The transfer from the DAT will be in real-time so it will take as long
as it takes to listen to the tape.

You might consider a flash memory or hard disk recorder like our PDAudio
system or the others compared on our Web page:

http://www.core-sound.com/comparison-pdaudio-pmd-670-fr-2.html

You can transfer those audio files instantly simply by removing the
memory card from the recorder and inserting it into a card reader on you
Mac. No uploading, no USB, no FireWire.

--
Len Moskowitz PDAudio, Binaural Mics, Cables, DPA, M-Audio
Core Sound http://www.stealthmicrophones.com
Teaneck, New Jersey USA http://www.core-sound.com
moskowit@core-sound.com Tel: 201-801-0812, FAX: 201-801-0912
 
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hank alrich wrote:
>
> If it's a new G5 it already has optical I/O built-in. And we'd say
"it's
> about time"...

but the analogue audio interface is in the mac,
and audio circuitry in the dirty environment of any computer....
dale
 
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dale wrote:

> hank alrich wrote:
>
>>If it's a new G5 it already has optical I/O built-in. And we'd say
>
> "it's
>
>>about time"...
>
>
> but the analogue audio interface is in the mac,
> and audio circuitry in the dirty environment of any computer....
> dale
>



Not understanding this. If there's optical audio I/O, how can the audio
circuitry be *in* the Mac?
 
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> > > but the analogue audio interface is in the mac,
> > > and audio circuitry in the dirty environment of any computer....
> > > dale
> > >
> >
> >
> >
> > Not understanding this. If there's optical audio I/O, how can the
audio
> > circuitry be *in* the Mac?
>
> Well spotted!
> The audio from DAT to Mac will be in the digital domain already.
> The audio on the way out won't be, but I'm guessing you'll stay
digital
> until you burn to CD?
>
> Dave

I said analogue, that is because all mac's have an analogue in and out
like they all have firewire, standard equipment mini plug.
and the mac analogue I/O is not high quality as in "pro" use.

dale
 
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In article <1104952388.856671.46080@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com> dallen@frognet.net writes:

> but the analogue audio interface is in the mac,
> and audio circuitry in the dirty environment of any computer....

works better than you'd expect if it's a well designed sound card. I
don't know what's in a Mac (or the original poster's Mac) - it might
be junk, and therefore noisy. But I can't complain about noise with my
Lynx L22 card.


--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
 
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Scott Dorsey wrote:

> Fabrice wrote:

> >i was just wondering if anyone knows if it's possible to connect a DAT
> >recorder to a mac running os x. since i'm trying to do a bit of
> >location sound recording for film, but would also like to be able to
> >record sounds and manipulate them for post production, i'm just trying
> >to figure out what would be the best recorder to get. if anyone can
> >let me know how i'd go about transferring from DAT to mac, then that'd
> >be great, like what equipment i might need, and if i'd lose any
> >quality through doing so, then i'd be very grateful

> Sure, you can get an S-PDIF input for the Mac on a variety of cards. The
> transfer is realtime only, but I don't see any problem with that.

If it's a new G5 it already has optical I/O built-in. And we'd say "it's
about time"...


--
ha
 
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dale <dallen@frognet.net> wrote:

>> If it's a new G5 it already has optical I/O built-in. And we'd say
>"it's
>> about time"...
>
>but the analogue audio interface is in the mac,
>and audio circuitry in the dirty environment of any computer....

And the transfer via optical is real-time: two hours for a two hour
tape. Who can wait that long when you have a stackfull to transfer?

--
Len Moskowitz PDAudio, Binaural Mics, Cables, DPA, M-Audio
Core Sound http://www.stealthmicrophones.com
Teaneck, New Jersey USA http://www.core-sound.com
moskowit@core-sound.com Tel: 201-801-0812, FAX: 201-801-0912
 
G

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On 2005-01-05, Mike Rivers <mrivers@d-and-d.com> wrote:

> works better than you'd expect if it's a well designed sound card.

Shirley this stuff is opto-isolated these days. That's not expensive
anymore.
 
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james of tucson <fishbowl@conservatory.com> wrote:
>On 2005-01-05, Mike Rivers <mrivers@d-and-d.com> wrote:
>
>> works better than you'd expect if it's a well designed sound card.
>
>Shirley this stuff is opto-isolated these days. That's not expensive
>anymore.

That's phenomenally expensive compared with the costs these guys are
working with. For the most part, they are dealing with shaving fractions
of a cent off the cost of a board.

That's why TOSLINK optical stuff became popular... it's a lot cheaper than
properly isolating a copper wire so that it meets FCC Part 15 specs.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
 
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S O'Neill <nopsam@nospam.net> wrote:

> dale wrote:
>
> > hank alrich wrote:
> >
> >>If it's a new G5 it already has optical I/O built-in. And we'd say
> >
> > "it's
> >
> >>about time"...
> >
> >
> > but the analogue audio interface is in the mac,
> > and audio circuitry in the dirty environment of any computer....
> > dale
> >
>
>
>
> Not understanding this. If there's optical audio I/O, how can the audio
> circuitry be *in* the Mac?

Well spotted!
The audio from DAT to Mac will be in the digital domain already.
The audio on the way out won't be, but I'm guessing you'll stay digital
until you burn to CD?

Dave




--
To email remove the section in capitals from the email address.
 
G

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> "G5", which has an optical I/O for audio.
>
> ha

good job reading the sales brochure

dale
 
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dale wrote:

> I said analogue, that is because all mac's have an analogue in and out
> like they all have firewire, standard equipment mini plug.
> and the mac analogue I/O is not high quality as in "pro" use.

"G5", which has an optical I/O for audio.

--
ha
 
G

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to beat the real time download of the dat to mac
you could just buy the ibook or powerbook
use that as your field recorder.
then do a firewire transfer
with 10.3 os you just open that port and drag and copy between macs.
dale
 
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In article <crienr$4ld$1@panix2.panix.com> moskowit@panix.com writes:

> And the transfer via optical is real-time: two hours for a two hour
> tape. Who can wait that long when you have a stackfull to transfer?

Someone older than 50 years old who remembers that we didn't always
have file-speed transfers.

Why not listen while you're making the transfer? It might be the first
time in 10 years that you've heard that material. Maybe you'll decide
after the first fifteen minutes that it's not worth transferring.


--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
 

Chris

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Len Moskowitz wrote:
> dale <dallen@frognet.net> wrote:
>
>
>>>If it's a new G5 it already has optical I/O built-in. And we'd say
>>
>>"it's
>>
>>>about time"...
>>
>>but the analogue audio interface is in the mac,
>>and audio circuitry in the dirty environment of any computer....
>
>
> And the transfer via optical is real-time: two hours for a two hour
> tape. Who can wait that long when you have a stackfull to transfer?


Time is part of the problems. You have to make sure to keep the computer
alone during the time of "recording" or you'll risk having clicks and
pops. I like the new Hi-MD format. The transfer is completely digital
via USB. Although it isn't fast, I don't need to worry about
interruptions during transfers.
 
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