Everyday Tech Myths

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sublifer

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For some other ideas to investigate:

The drop test. Many years ago, when I was in the military we had some special ruggedized computers that were a real pain in the butt to take apart (80+ screws per panel) so rather than take them apart to swap components we always started with a drop test. With the machine off and unplugged we'd lift it (about 60-80 pounds) about 12-18 inches off the bench then drop it. Plug it in and test it. It actually worked about 40% of the time. The drop test continued once we got regular PCs. It didn't work as often but it did still work 10% or so of the time. My best guess is that the connectors when dropped got a cleaner, stronger connection.

One other thing is CRT monitors and TVs. When they get older the picture starts distorting. Actually just had one the other day, the picture was pinched together mostly at the bottom end and was lifted. A nice solid smack on the side or top would return the picture to normal. No idea how that one works...
 

waffle911

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[citation][nom]crisisavatar[/nom]"However, make sure you turn the computer off either with the power switch on the power supply itself (not the button on the front of the PC)." Wait what won't that sudden power shutdown dmg components ? That seriously goes against my common sense, I hope they mean shut computer down first and then flip your PSU.[/citation]They mean to turn off the computer as per usual, then cut power to PSU. You should never just cut power to the PSU if you can help it.
[citation][nom]mitch074[/nom]...no heat (40°C) - let it DRY in open air naturally (that oven thing is crazy! Never, NEVER put electronics in temperatures above what they are rated to operate in: 80°C is the MAX when NOT IN OPERATION; forget about hair dryers too) - take it apart again, an put back the PCB inThere! Good as new keyboards.[/citation]
For reference, the article mentioned temperatures of 125-150°F, not 125-150°C. 80°C is roughly 176°F, 40°C is 104°F, 125°F is roughly 52°C, and 150°F is roughly 66°C. Room temperature is about 70°F, which is a little more than 20°C.
 

Stickywulf

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I wash my keyboard in the kitchen sink about twice each year and have never had any problems.

The technique described in the article has two faults:
1. High temperature of dishwasher rinse cycle is only borderline safe.
2. The oven has no effect in drying the keyboard - the interior would still be dripping wet.

Try again, but this time wash the keyboard in warm water only. To dry: open the casing, and then blot with a towel, and then leave to dry for a day before reassembling.

Same works for mobile phones if dropped in water. Within 30sec remove the battery. If the battery is removed quick enough, then crack open the casing, and then blot with a towel and then leave to dry for a day.

There is rarely bad side effects from getting electronics wet as long as there is not power connected. Dry completely before returning power and it should work, no worries.
 

Darkk

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Years ago when I was using the Commodore Amiga 500 with a 20meg hard drive with some memory expansion card in it. Well, one day I tipped over a glass of milk over the keyboard and since it's all integrated as one piece of equipment the milk got onto the hard drive and memory chips. The computer shorted itself out and powered down on it's own. I was like aww crap. So I took the thing apart and cleaned up the liquids and let it dry for a day. The next day I put it all back together and it powered up just fine. Although it shorted out some DRAM chips but the computer compensated for it by mapping them out as "bad memory". The OS and program ran fine with it. Pretty resilient OS at the time.


 
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On the girl that can't wear watches, I had a similar problem with a woman that kept killing laptops, and never wore a watch as they would keep dying - turned out to be her nylon pantyhose/stockings. She stopped wearing them after a leg injury and our problems went away. Once she had recovered and wore hose again the problems came back, perhaps it is something to do with static electricity, not sure, but she was banned from wearing them in the office, and it worked!
 
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WRONG way to wash a keyboard. Just remove the top from the bottom. The bottom has all your electronis etc. the top is just plastic and keys. Feel free to wash the top all you want, then dry and put back together.

Ya i know it requires removing 5 or 6 screws too hard!
 
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