HP G62 Black screen with flashing caps lock

JoshM11

Commendable
Jan 3, 2017
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1,510
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Hello, i have an HP G62, i have the black screen at startup, no post can the get into bios, when i start it i hear the fans and hdd spin, but nothing but a red wifi indicator and continuous caps lock flash, doesn't stop and blinks every 3-4 seconds, i have tried taking out hdd and putting it back, tried heating it up inside a towel as suggested tried using one ram module, tried switching ram spots, tried unplugged wireless card ans starting without ram, still same thing, tried using just power cord and tried power cycling by taking battery out and holding power for 30 seconds, any help would be great tried everything i've found and no luck. Thanks a lot
 

SchizTech

Distinguished
Jan 16, 2011
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In my experience that flashing light is usually associated with a bad motherboard. It sounds like you've tried the basic troubleshooting steps to rule out other issues. Further steps would require other parts to test with (different RAM, possibly even CPU) but I'd guess it's the board.

If you are happy with that older notebook, or simply can't afford to upgrade (and are comfortable attempting such a repair), look under the RAM slots for the HP motherboard model number ("replace with hp spare XXXXXX-XXX) where that number in X's is what you can look for on ebay.
 
Jun 7, 2018
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LIsten ..if anyone says your motherboard is dead or bad motherboard so the person is truly an idiot without knowledge the simple solution is change the CMOS battery (find and buy original one) its cheaper actually, download BIOS update from HP official web by identifying your laptop, (link blow)
https://support.hp.com/us-en/drivers/laptops
run this file to a different computer and install into a blank USB (during installation the following software will ask for the USB)
After, insert USB into to your HP G42 notebook, press and hold windows key and letter B key together and the press and hold the power key for 3 seconds and release but keep holding WINDOWS Key + B, your Notebook will start and follow the instruction on the screen to update your bios.
Note in some HP models Letter V key works instead of Letter B key.
Thats it.
 

JoshM11

Commendable
Jan 3, 2017
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1,510
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It ended up being a bad connection from the Screen and motherboard, i had to heat it up in a towel for sometimes an hour + to get it to recconect, took a few tries but try this if you need a solution.
 
Jun 20, 2018
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Did you remove battery when heating up? How did you heat it up?


 

Grabps

Prominent
Jun 30, 2017
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Hi,
I have got a HP G62 laptop from a client and the problem was the same as You described.
- Not turning on
- Wifi and Power LED was flashing

I did try out the hard reset and the other suggested solutions, but nothing helped me out.
I thought the problem is that the laptop overheats, so I removed the black plastic layer under the VGA cable. The intresting part was when the laptop was disassembled, but the necessery parts were plugged together, I wanted to test if it is working and it DID!

After some tries it turned out the source of the disbehave was a screw, which was holding the DVD drive.
So I changed it to a smaller one and it fixed it!
I guess the screw causes a circuit, but it is just a guess.

I hope it helps You guys out! ;)
 
Oct 26, 2018
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Can you give a little bit more, I have g62, dissassembled on my desk at the moment, normally i just heat it up and it works after. but if you have a solution i'm all ears. I have all the screws and the dvd drive removed from the laptop and the keyboard and power switch just plugged in and still no load.
 

GuccizBud

Estimable
Mar 1, 2014
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[ . . . ] How did you heat it up?

Here's some info on the whole "heat it up" thing.

Your motherboard contains lots of little solder points, and sometimes, after a length of time, little fractures can form in those solder points. Some people will say this happens when a manufacturer uses cheap solder, and I've heard it said that's the case with hp® . . . regardless, any solder which is cracked is a source of potential performance instability, because it's like introducing an on/off switch set to "off" at that point in the circuit. The idea behind heating up the board, then, is to get it warm enough for the solder to start getting soft, to start flowing a little, so that any solder fractures disappear, and so that once the heat is removed and the board cools down again, every solder point becomes one contiguous unit again.

This can be done professionally, in which case it's called a "motherboard reflow"⁠ ⁠— you can try Googling it, and there's a Wikipedia article about it⁠ ⁠— but as I said it's a professional job, it is done by hand, and you really have to know what you're doing.

But what an amateur can do is try his luck by simply heating up the whole board as a unit to see if that will do the trick. There are 3 ways this can be done, and 2 of them involve stripping the laptop down to the bare motherboard. If you do that, then the board can be heated up using either a heat gun, or an oven. You can look up both⁠ ⁠— how to do a mobo reflow using a heat gun, or using your kitchen oven.

The third way, which doesn't require taking the laptop apart, simply makes use of a towel. Turn your laptop over and locate the cooling vents . . . these are just parallel slots cut into the plastic chassis on the underside (and sometimes including the side) of the laptop. You want to block those vents using a thick towel, then turn the laptop on, and leave it like that for about 1⁠ ⁠hour. During that hour, the heat generated inside the casing (which is considerable) will be unable to escape because you blocked the exit . . . this will cause the temperature inside to increase enough over an hour's time to cause the solder to soften up, hopefully enough to fix the problem.

Tip⁠ ⁠᎓  if you do the towel method, when the hour is up, remove the towel and try turning the laptop on immediately⁠ ⁠— don't wait for it to cool down. You want to do that because, if it does turn on, and then some time later it doesn't anymore, this is a pretty convincing indicator that the problem is indeed most likely the solder points, because it means you softened them up enough to temporarily reestablish a complete circuit, but not enough for it to stay that way after it cools down again. If in such a case you had waited for it to cool down before trying it, you wouldn't have had any indication that what you did helped at all.

In such a case you would then have the option of either getting it professionally done or trying to apply more heat, perhaps with an oven . . . but remember that the more heat you apply, the greater the odds of you doing more harm than good.

Read as much as you can before attempting anything, there's lots of info on all of this. There's also the thread below in this very forum⁠ ⁠᎓

 
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