Japanese Scientists Create Elastic Water

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omnimodis78

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[citation][nom]kami3k[/nom]I wonder what this "organic material" actually is. Just because it's organic doesn't mean it's perfectly safe for humans or the environment.[/citation]
I know what you mean, but in this particular case it's not that the benefits would be minimal, it's that they would be like night and day. Plastic doesn't decompose, it's an environmental and health nightmare to make, etc - so as long as whatever replaces it can decompose in the long term and has less negative environmental impact in its manufacturing process is a win in my book! Organic food on the other hand is typically a scam to get people to spend more money on.
 

AMDnoob

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i dont understand why i got down voted so much. Perhaps i said tht in a bit a bratty way, sorry. But I'm being completely serious. Water shortages are among use, and are one of many future environmental problems that await us within the next decade. As of now, the City of Chicago has been wanting to tap into Lake Michigan in order to utilize the huge amounts of water. Even Cities in Colorado and Las Vegas have been eyeing the Great Lakes with temptation. And, with another use for water, this will cause prices to go up as now you the consumer will be competing for it more than ever. Just my 2 cents. (Seriously, I'm not trying to start a flame war, I'm just getting behind a cause that I see is valuable)
 

omnimodis78

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[citation][nom]AMDnoob[/nom]i dont understand why i got down voted so much. Perhaps i said tht in a bit a bratty way, sorry. But I'm being completely serious. Water shortages are among use, and are one of many future environmental problems that await us within the next decade. As of now, the City of Chicago has been wanting to tap into Lake Michigan in order to utilize the huge amounts of water. Even Cities in Colorado and Las Vegas have been eyeing the Great Lakes with temptation. And, with another use for water, this will cause prices to go up as now you the consumer will be competing for it more than ever. Just my 2 cents. (Seriously, I'm not trying to start a flame war, I'm just getting behind a cause that I see is valuable)[/citation]
I think the reason you got voted down by so many is because "water" doesn't automatically mean fresh (drinkeable) water, and there's plenty of water to be 'borrowed' from the oceans. To be fair, you are absolutely correct, fresh water is a precious resource which perhaps in our own life time will be more valuable than crude oil (laughable now, but a serious possibility nontheless). I think your comment wasn't very clear at first.
 

skine

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[citation][nom]AMDnoob[/nom]i dont understand why i got down voted so much. [/citation]

In this instance, it's probably because you stated that "this won't help much at all."

Also, while you do make potentially valid points*, they are lost on your usage and style of language. I'll admit that, upon first viewing, I dismissed your post for seeming immature - causing me to assume ignorance. Even upon second viewing, your claims were unclear and it was not obvious why they were true.

Remember:
-Use proper spelling, grammar, and use language that is appropriate to the tone of the conversation; If the audience is distracted by these, they aren't paying attention to your words.
-Be concise and direct; three sentences are not better than one.
-If you make a claim that is not obvious, then provide and explanation.
-Don't make blanket statements when there is no call to.


*such as using glass instead of plastic, and showing concern of how this will effect fresh water resources - especially if the process can't be undone. At least this is what I take from your post.
 

Nexus52085

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[citation][nom]omnimodis78[/nom]Absolutely any research done to replace plastic with something more organic is a step in the right direction![/citation]
Yeah, too bad the oil cartel is gonna find some way to banish it from the U.S.
 

ukcal

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[citation][nom]AMDnoob[/nom]UH HELLLOOOOO!!! Like we need another reason to consume MORE water. We're already on our way to a global fresh water shortage. This solves one problem (replacement for plastic) and causes/worsens another (future water shortages). How bout we make everything out of glass? jk, but honestly this won't help much at all.[/citation]

And if sea levels are rising, use the extra water there instead.
Anyone else see the logic in that?
 

jabliese

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FYI, AMDNoob, the City of Chicago already taps Lake Michigan for it's water, has for years. They have a huge pipe that extends 3/4 of a mile out into the lake. They may be looking to expand that capability, do not know. Really should not concern you, though, because that water eventually comes back to the lake. Great Lakes water has to stay within the Great Lakes watershed. And, honestly, no where in the Great Lakes basin is there a shortage of fresh water.
 
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This sounds like Ice-9. Kurt Vonnegut wrote about a substance that could be dropped into water that would make it solid, used in a military application to change swamps into easily traversed terrain. The problem in Vonneguts' story was that the process continued until all the water on the planet was turned into Ice-9, no water left to drink. This seems to be a case of life imitating art? or truth is stranger than fiction?
 
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AMDNoob,
Um Chicago is not "wanting to tap into" Lake Michigan. That is where we get our fresh water from and have for well over 100 years now. Yep, its pretty nice living next to a huge body of fresh water. That is what we learned from our ancestors I guess.
Maybe you meant to say we are "defending" it from states like Colorado/Arizona/New Mexico/Utah/Nevada/California who would like nothing more than to run a pipeline into our natural fresh water source and steal it from us. And have even tried to illegally run a pipeline through Canada to get at it and got caught red handed. For Shame.
 
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sea levels are rising because ice caps are melting, that's not a *good* thing. Water isn't a renewable resource, so I can't see how this can be sustainable, while it is a very interesting concept. That said, we can't just 'borrow' water from the ocean to feed our non-plastic needs. The idea is intriguing, but it concerns me. I want to know more about its decomp, and the impact it would have on the global water supply.
 

WyomingKnott

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[citation][nom]AMDnoob[/nom]UH HELLLOOOOO!!! Like we need another reason to consume MORE water. We're already on our way to a global fresh water shortage. This solves one problem (replacement for plastic) and causes/worsens another (future water shortages). How bout we make everything out of glass? jk, but honestly this won't help much at all.[/citation]
OK, make the bricks out of carbon, to sequester the carbon.
"People who live in diamond houses can throw stones all they want."
 

nottheking

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Actually, contrary to popular belief, sea levels haven't been rising measurably; the melting of glaciers has apparently been met with the rapid thickening of the Antarctic ice sheet... Which ISN'T melting, and in fact is thickening by 5 feet/year at the south pole, hence gaining far more ice than it loses by icebergs cleaving at the edges. ('course, no word on whether Antarctica snagging all that water is any better than rising sea levels)

Also, referring to plastic as not "organic?" That word doesn't mean what you think it means... I'd recommend learning some basic high school chemistry. Not decomposing readily doesn't make it any less organic.

As far as the actual subject at hand... From the looks of it, we've had this "elastic water" for years... It's Colloquialy known as "Jello." I honestly don't see it replacing our current synthetic polymers in any other than a small handful of applications. Given that the resulting substance isn't molecular, but rather just apparently a colloid, it's not as stable; (i.e, think of non-newtonian fluids, like this popular YouTube video) this means that in certain situations in everyday life, the substance might fail.

I'm particularly concerned over situations where the "elastic water" would be exposed toward any water-leeching substances, or even mild temperature shifts... Since it's not a separate molecule, there's nothing to stop the molecular water present from leaving one way or another. An example of this would be your own body; soak your hand in water for minutes, and your skin gets wrinkly due to absorbing extra water; stick it in salt, and it gets dry and itcy from the salt sapping water right through your skin.

All told, I suppose I'm curious to see how this substance is different from existing water-based solids.
 
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