• Check out all the best Amazon Prime Day deals 2021 here!

Japanese Scientists Create Elastic Water

Page 3 - Seeking answers? Join the Tom's Guide community: where nearly two million members share solutions and discuss the latest tech.
Status
Not open for further replies.

ethanolson

Distinguished
Jun 25, 2009
125
0
18,630
0
Plastics (at least 95% of them) are organic already. This changes the organic composition in a cool way and I think it's really neat. I grew up with plastic as the family business and I think this is really cool, but with a material mixture like that it'll be hard to work purity and safety into the product if there are problems. It took a few decades to work out most free radicals from modern plastics. I wonder how this will take. I'm all for exploring this further.
 
G

Guest

Guest
Just what I was expecting fram Japan! -and I have interest in using this product for business -so if anyone could tell me the company it would be great_ Sofia Stereo Kvammen -Norway
 
G

Guest

Guest
Sure, it's a great idea, perhaps, but, I assume this 'elastic water'; which I dislike the name of very much, as it no longer is water at all (water being real H2O); would dissolve once it got any real water on it. Of course, the idea is still pretty damn good, but 95% water? I doubt it would work that well. But then again, I'm no scientist, and I dropped out of school in year 11, and I still didn't get a job (Not that this means I'm stupid, at all, 'cause I'm smarter than most people, just effortless and it's only been a month since I actually dropped out). But, still, I doubt it would work as well as we all expect it to. It could be way too elastic to even work, or, if we stretch it out too much, and then it got any more water on it, I bet it would break. I could be wrong, but I'd like to think I'm not. Hopefully, I am.
 
G

Guest

Guest
Years ago there was some 'water that flowed uphill' type invention. Looked similar to this but was liquid. I think this was back in the early 80s.
 
G

Guest

Guest
Having thought about it, I can see it being used in temporary situations, like plastic jugs, and the plastic circly things they put on pop cans. It only needs to last long enough for you to get it home and throw it in the trash, to the dump or wherever where it melts, and re-enters the water supply through natural means? Just a thought.
 
G

Guest

Guest
I guess I am old fashioned, but we need water to continue to exist. If we start using it for too many other purposes could we end up shorting ourselves of an essential component of life in the long run?
 

netpatriot

Distinguished
Feb 2, 2010
2
0
18,510
0
ok they blew it by saying "..or could replace plastic altogether" now some big plastic malefactor will buy the rights to make this stuff and we will never hear from it again.. well in a worst case scenario anyway.
 
G

Guest

Guest
Hydroponic gardens are a good way to use icecap water, just store the water near the garden and recycle it, and as for replacing plastic I say go for it, but in the meantime we can start using reusable metal bottles for water instead of buying plastic bottles.
 
G

Guest

Guest
it may be a wise invention but i think any thing done away from environment i.e., any thing unnatural will certainly a harm to environment in a direct way or in other way. it may be recognized late after invention
 
G

Guest

Guest
We are moving away from chemicals and fossil fuels but something still bothers me.
In most cases it is water that is being used to supplement or replace the current tech.
In case of hydrogen cars it is water, here we have water plastic, etc.
The nagging concern I have is this, will the water on earth last?
We are already facing serious shortages on some continents, messing with this seems a bit risky to me?

I'm not a learned scientist, but once water is gone it is gone? The mayor building block for all life on earth?
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

ASK THE COMMUNITY