Looking for help with Nikon D5500

bjornl

Estimable
Mar 16, 2016
399
0
3,060
182


Congratulations on your new camera. It is quite a good one. However just buying a camera does not make you ready to be a professional any more than buying a car makes you ready to compete in the dakar rally. You need to be patient with yourself and learn photography first.

Ask yourself this question, do you really want to be the person that ruined the special day some young woman might have been dreaming about since she was a little girl? Many people attach huge amounts of emotional baggage to their wedding. This includes having the photos "just so". This isn't something you can just buy a tool walk in and press the magical "make art" button and viola.

I am not suggesting that you don't persue your dream, far from it. I just want to caution you to not ruin the dreams of others while persuing your own. Begin by leaning the basics of photography.

I suggest that taking a class is the fastest way to get started. Locally to me both Tacoma Community College or Seattle Central Community College (along with others) offer introduction to photography classes.

Next get some books on composition and use of light. Consider getting a good portait lens (such as a Sigma 50mm f/1.4 ART and/or a Nikon 85mm f/1.8g) and a decent bounce flash like a Nikon SB700 and doing free protraits of every resident of a old folks home (deliver print outs back in a little frame from Ikea or Micheals).

Take 10,000 (or more) photos of different people, different lighting (indoors, outdoors, good light, bad light, groups, and so on. Then you might be ready to consider if in your opinion your skills have advanced to the point where they are worth the fee you want for them. And as a bonus you will have a portfolio to show.
 

wordofmitch

Honorable
Jun 28, 2013
19
0
10,590
11
You are going to have to be specific about what kind of help you are after specifically?

How new are you to your camera? Can you use full manual yet? Have you learned how ISO, aperture and shutter speed effect your images yet?
 
To get out there without having to worry about settings, set the camera to P mode on the dial on the top of your camera, and start taking picture in auto focus. Change the focus type of necessary. Don't worry about exposure, just make sure you shoot RAW images, so that you can bring back detail/expose properly/color correct/color grade in post. You don't want to fiddle with a bunch of settings, that way you're sure to lose important moments.
 

bjornl

Estimable
Mar 16, 2016
399
0
3,060
182


Congratulations on your new camera. It is quite a good one. However just buying a camera does not make you ready to be a professional any more than buying a car makes you ready to compete in the dakar rally. You need to be patient with yourself and learn photography first.

Ask yourself this question, do you really want to be the person that ruined the special day some young woman might have been dreaming about since she was a little girl? Many people attach huge amounts of emotional baggage to their wedding. This includes having the photos "just so". This isn't something you can just buy a tool walk in and press the magical "make art" button and viola.

I am not suggesting that you don't persue your dream, far from it. I just want to caution you to not ruin the dreams of others while persuing your own. Begin by leaning the basics of photography.

I suggest that taking a class is the fastest way to get started. Locally to me both Tacoma Community College or Seattle Central Community College (along with others) offer introduction to photography classes.

Next get some books on composition and use of light. Consider getting a good portait lens (such as a Sigma 50mm f/1.4 ART and/or a Nikon 85mm f/1.8g) and a decent bounce flash like a Nikon SB700 and doing free protraits of every resident of a old folks home (deliver print outs back in a little frame from Ikea or Micheals).

Take 10,000 (or more) photos of different people, different lighting (indoors, outdoors, good light, bad light, groups, and so on. Then you might be ready to consider if in your opinion your skills have advanced to the point where they are worth the fee you want for them. And as a bonus you will have a portfolio to show.
 

mprospero

Senior Editor
Oct 4, 2013
751
4
18,965
12
I would have to agree with @bjornl. You need to get some experience not only using your camera, but taking photos at weddings, before you start billing for services.
To his advice, I would also add that you should try and find some wedding photographers near you, and offer to work for them for free in exchange for lessons and tips. If you happen to go to any weddings as a guest, bring your camera and take lots of photos. Look at online wedding albums, and see what kind of photos the photographer takes, too.
But it takes a lot of practice. Good luck!

 
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