Norton Security 2015 Review: One Size Fits All

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MWW2015

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Feb 24, 2015
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I have been receiving numerous emails from a company sending SPAM email. In the past I have used the Norton Antispam system that comes with Norton 360 to place it in the SPAM folder. On Monday February 16, 2015, I received another email from this same SPAM sender that ended up in the inbox, so I figured I would contact Norton for help at stopping this SPAM because their Antispam software doesn’t seem to be working.
At approximately 5:00 pm I got on the Norton website service and began a chat with one of the technicians. I was assigned case number 20616027. I did not copy down the name of the tech that was helping me but it was a foreign spelled first and last name. I also informed the tech that ever since I upgraded from Norton Internet Security to Norton 360, my computer takes much longer to start up. The tech said he would help me fix both problems by remotely getting onto my computer. He first worked on the SPAM issue. He spent a long time doing this and it almost seemed he didn’t know what he was doing, or had to read up on it or something. After completing the issue he worked to speed up my computer. He said it was a Microsoft issue but he would fix it for me. He went in and deleted my Temp Files and then went into some Norton system folders and added “OLD” in front of them. I was thinking this was his way to fix some Norton Issues. He then had me reboot my computer. When it booted up it didn’t work any better. The tech told me it was the best he could do and to contact Microsoft, because it was a Microsoft issue. I disagreed because this problem only occurred when I upgraded to Norton 360.
When I went onto Norton 360 it was not working and came up with error messages that said I needed to erase Norton 360 and reinstall it. The Tech had managed to screw up Norton 360 with all the things that he did. I was very upset. So I got back onto the Norton Website to chat with another tech which I gave my case number 20616027. He told me he had to get on my computer remotely and remove Norton 360 and reinstall it. It took a long time but he finally fixed my computer. In fact after the reinstallation my computer was working as fast and therefore like I expected, the issue was with Norton and not Microsoft.
On Tuesday February 17, 2015 I received a call that came up “Unknown” on my cell phone. A guy asked for me by my first name. He said he was calling because he wanted to help fix the SPAM issue I was having. Right then I suspected something was not right because Norton Techs worked on it the day before and they are the only ones that knew about the email SPAM problem. This person even referred to the email address the SPAM was sent from. In addition I gave Norton my cell phone number for the first time, so it is interesting this person called my cell.
I decided to play along. I said it would be great if they could help me. I asked what number he was calling me from. He said 844-999-9666. I asked what the name of his company was. He said “FIX BY TECH”. He even spelled out the name. I asked him what his name was and he said “Andrew Parker” which he also spelled out. He had a foreign accent so I figured that was not his real name. I then asked him how much this would cost. He said between $50 and $150 to fix. I said that would be good, what do I need to do? He asked if I could I go to my computer and turn it on so he could fix the problem? I said I could not do it right now, but I will do it and call him. He said if you call that number ask for Samantha who was the person in charge and she would get my computer fixed.
I have a neighbor that had AVG Security on their computer but somehow contacted the “cryptolocker" virus a few weeks ago. I told them they should have purchased Norton Internet Security or Norton 360 to protect their computer. They purchased the program and installed it on their computer to try and fix the virus issue. It may have been too late for them to do, but regardless they contacted Norton for help. A technician worked on their computer but could not solve the problem. Interesting enough they received a call the next day from someone that said they could fix the computer. The Caller ID number was 631-353-4127. They said that Norton could not fix their problem but they could for $100 and wanted to know if they should proceed. When my neighbor got suspicious of the call and started asking questions, the person hung up.
How are these people getting access to Norton Customers? I have lost all trust in Norton support. I believe there is criminal activity going on within this company. I contacted Norton and they are investigating but I wanted your readers to be aware of this issue. If you look on line you will see other people around the country are being contacted by these scam artists after talking to Norton Support.
http://800notes.com/Phone.aspx/1-631-353-4127
http://800notes.com/Phone.aspx/1-844-999-9666
https://www.everycaller.com/phone-number/1-631-353-4127/

 

Paul Wagenseil

Senior Editor
Apr 11, 2014
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The second caller was definitely a tech-support scam. These have become very common in the past year, and mainly come from India. I doubt that Norton or its parent company Symantec are directly involved, but it's possible that someone at a Norton outsourced service center in India is feeding lists of service calls to a scam-call center.
 

MWW2015

Estimable
Feb 24, 2015
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I agree. Norton may have hired this company for support but they should be on top of these companies and are still responsible. They should have at least offered everyone that reported the scam some protection since these people now have my cell phone, name, address, etc. On top of that these people still call a few times every month. Norton had done nothing even though they now agree it is their fault. My only resort is now to file a lawsuit.
 

Skylyne

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Sep 7, 2014
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AV-Test Certification Devalued

I think this should be duly noted by readers of these articles. You're basing protection on testing done by a lab that has been known for lowered standards; and this has been known for a while. I wouldn't recommend anything based on AV-Test recommendations, for this reason alone.

As I've said before, while I am biased AGAINST Kaspersky, they do know their stuff. If they say one thing, I don't take it lightly. My linked blog post should not be taken lightly.
 

Paul Wagenseil

Senior Editor
Apr 11, 2014
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I did. You seem to like AV-Comparatives. That's fine, but that lab doesn't evaluate as many products, or evaluate products as frequently, as AV-TEST. We can't limit ourselves to only those products that AV-Comparatives looks at.
 

Skylyne

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Sep 7, 2014
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So you're saying that a post from a Kaspersky guy is proof of me being biased toward AVC? Do you know why I prefer AVC? Do you realise that could easily change? I go where the reports are comprehensive, and provide actual testing results. That's why I prefer AVC. I have no affiliation, and no bias towards them, outside of the fact that they release proper reports for their testing. They're the only lab that releases comprehensive test results, which is why I prefer them.

Before AV-Test lowered their standards, I would have been behind them just as much. They have a much easier user interface, and cater to the lesser experienced home user. Why wouldn't I prefer that over the fairly complicated reports released by AVC?

Also, AVC does provide private testing. If Tom's Hardware wanted AVC to do a comprehensive review for them, to help make a more informed review (for the users who read the article), then hire them. I've inquired abotu them testing products for me, and it doesn't cost too much. For the public test results, they release a small batch of testing publicly based on the person/company who sends them software, and requests the results to be released publicly. I even posted their email replies I received in another thread, which covers most of this. They're a very transparent testing lab, and are happy to disclose whatever they can without breaking their NDAs. They also have a rapid email response time, compared to most labs. Send them an email, and you'll see what I mean.

I follow the numbers, not blanket statements... which is not currently in favour of AV-Test.
 

Paul Wagenseil

Senior Editor
Apr 11, 2014
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What post from a Kaspersky guy? And I didn't say you were biased towards AVC. But I am still curious about how AV-TEST lowered its standards. I am not doubting you -- I just need to see the evidence.
 

Skylyne

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Sep 7, 2014
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If you read that link, then you read the post from Eugene Kaspersky. I was half distracted, otherwise I would have said the name lol. This is what happens when you post on here while you're at work lol.

And yes, that post came from a reputable source. He knows what he's talking about, so it's up to you to take it or leave it. All I'm saying is that blog post about AV-Test isn't something that should be taken lightly. If TH wants to ignore it, then that's not my call... but it definitely is ignoring something of importance. Finding evidence of what changed at AV-Test? That's something you would have to consult AV-Test about directly. I don't see why I have to provide the proof, when it's a single email away for you.
 

Lauren w

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Jan 31, 2016
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I just downloaded Norton's 2016 Deluxe suite and it is giving me a "Chrome Protection Alert" and saying that I need to enable Norton Chrome extensions. Is this something that is recommended/necessary? Reviews I read were either completely supportive of its efficacy or completely negative regarding its shortcomings (bogs the internet speed down, doesn't work reliably). I'd appreciate any and all informed thoughts. Thanks!
 

Paul Wagenseil

Senior Editor
Apr 11, 2014
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Many antivirus products require that their own extensions/add-ons are enabled in Web browsers in order to screen URLs and block Web-based attacks. I don't know how well Norton's own extensions work, or how much they slow down a browser, but you could always try them out, and then disable them if you don't like them.

To disable extensions, click the stack icon at the very right of the Chrome browser bar, scroll down to Settings in the menu that appears, and then click on Extensions at the top of left of the window that appears.
 
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