President Obama Intros Consumer Privacy Bill of Rights

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Impeach the Kenyan? OK, so only if you are anglo saxon can you be the President of the United States. Thanks, but no thanks a-hole. I'll vote for whom I feel is best without the prejudiced BS.
 

garyshome

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Except when I need the info to get Re-elected than the rules don't count. Oh and after it's passed and I take all the credit er a well then we will add a few other things that I forgot it tell you about.
 

garyshome

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Just try to get help with Identity theft from credit card companies. This has happened to me about 17 years ago and I Still cannot get it corrected. This is a good idea but Obummer is clueless about how to get it to work correctly. Oh ah and don't forget to vote for me because I do all of oh ah all of this stuff FOR YOU.
 

mrmaia

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A Do Not Track agreement has already been signed by AOL, Google, Microsoft and Yahoo who, claims the government, accounts for 90-percent of behavior-based advertisement.
What a silly statement. Facebook - which conveniently stayed out of the deal - counts for WAY more than 10% alone.
 

Tesla1483

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Reading some of these comments, it seems like people are willing to complain about anything, even when it's something that will protect consumers from something like the malicious and underhanded use of personal data.

And to the constitutional literalists who ask where in the constitution is congress specifically granted the power to make such a law: Step back for a second and think about what you actually just said. If the constitution were to go ahead and enumerate every single instance in which a law may be created by congress, they would still be writing it. They have a right to make laws protecting consumers from corporations who, believe it or not, may not have your best interests at heart. Not everyone is a lawyer and is willing to wade through seas of license agreements, disclaimers, legal jargon and the like in order to make an informed decision on whether or not their data will be treated with a generally expected level of privacy and discretion (nor should they have to.)
 

txsouthpaw

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[citation][nom]Tesla1483[/nom]Reading some of these comments, it seems like people are willing to complain about anything, even when it's something that will protect consumers from something like the malicious and underhanded use of personal data.And to the constitutional literalists who ask where in the constitution is congress specifically granted the power to make such a law: Step back for a second and think about what you actually just said. If the constitution were to go ahead and enumerate every single instance in which a law may be created by congress, they would still be writing it. They have a right to make laws protecting consumers from corporations who, believe it or not, may not have your best interests at heart. Not everyone is a lawyer and is willing to wade through seas of license agreements, disclaimers, legal jargon and the like in order to make an informed decision on whether or not their data will be treated with a generally expected level of privacy and discretion (nor should they have to.)[/citation]
+1
There are far too many who express their political opinion by parroting-back the bigoted filth pedaled by Pinochet's Pseudo-News Network. These same brainless individuals have been coaxed into believing that the collective body corporate's motives are somehow purely benign and that any legislation that comes from the desk of the "Socialist Radical" (A.K.A. The black man we don't trust) directly conflicts with their hallucinogenic interpretation of the Constitution.
 

slabbo

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We don't need this bill, right to privacy is already inherent in many of the amendments in the Bill of Rights. It is a basic human right.

But from reading this particular new bill, it looks like you're legally giving permission for the companies to use your information if you allow them to. So if you say okay and allow your information to be used, then company X can do this, this, and that with your information legally. it's not much different from many of the EULA's already in effect. What I'm afraid this would do is, take place of our current rights to privacy then later down the line they change this bill to remove our rights.
 

fracture

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"while businesses will be required to be transparent."

That's the main thing in that bill that the Government wants. Remember the stories from last year? Now they won't need a search warrant.
 

wiyosaya

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In my opinion, this is insufficient. I want to able to tell a company to delete all my personal information and they have to comply by law.
 

stevo777

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This is good. I just don't like when they used terms like "reasonable limits". Reasonable to whom, the consumer, or the information pedlers?
 
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