Quantum Dot to Bring Better Color to Smaller Screens

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wiyosaya

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Personally, I think claims of cheaper to produce than OLEDs, while true for the moment, are rather empty. In large sizes, you can pick up LG's 55EA9800 for $1,999 US these days down from $10,999 us when introduced which is a rather marked decrease. As OLED ramps up, prices are going to plummet, and I'll speculate that that drop will be rather rapid.

So while we are not seeing OLEDs in monitor sizes yet, they will come, and in what may be a relatively short time-frame, they will likely quickly come to parity with LCD in terms of price. At that point, which one to purchase will be a no-brainer since OLED will outperform even QD LCD.
 

ih8aloss

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I'll take the Quantum Dot road over the OLED for one simple reason, ease of manufacturing! There are a plethora of companies able to use quantum dot technology and only one committed somewhat to continue OLED (LG) as they are also into quantum dot technology. So where do you put your money in this future technology? Quantum Materials Corp.! Displays are a small part of the growing number of applications quantum dots will be used in. The author of this article has no idea how right he is with his last statement "only be a matter of time before the technology becomes a household name."
 

Larry Litmanen

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Personally, I think claims of cheaper to produce than OLEDs, while true for the moment, are rather empty. In large sizes, you can pick up LG's 55EA9800 for $1,999 US these days down from $10,999 us when introduced which is a rather marked decrease. As OLED ramps up, prices are going to plummet, and I'll speculate that that drop will be rather rapid.

So while we are not seeing OLEDs in monitor sizes yet, they will come, and in what may be a relatively short time-frame, they will likely quickly come to parity with LCD in terms of price. At that point, which one to purchase will be a no-brainer since OLED will outperform even QD LCD.
I saw an OLED 4K TV in Best Buy and it was truly amazing. Having said that, i also saw Mac 5K and it was amazing too. If you want something that great you do have to pay for it.

But my point is this waiting game is non ending, if you simply buy a nice TV now you can really enjoy it and in 5 years get a great 8K or whatever they will have.
 

Merry_Blind

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Doesn't Quantum Dot technology only improve colors? If so, I don't really see how it compares to OLED since OLED is much more than just better colors...
 

photonboy

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Q-Dot isn't much different from existing LED HDTV's. It doesn't make much difference to BLACK LEVELS for example so OLED is better there.

If cost savings for Q-DOT exist then I'm sure they'll replace regular LED. As for OLED vs Q-DOT don't do a quick look at a few HDTV prices and use that as a guide. You just can't compare until the technology permeates the market more. For example, a company might be pushing OLED at break-even cost just to get some market saturation.

Q-DOT for those who don't know simply coats the LED backlight with a layer of "quantum dots" which absorb this light and re-radiate it in a tighter range of frequencies. The front LCD panel is still there and tweaked slightly based on the range of emitted light from the backlight.

Light "bleed" is why you never get "true blacks" and it's still there for Q-DOT technology since it's the LCD panel that bleeds (can't block all light). You might possibly get a new LCD panel to block slightly more light by using this method but it won't match OLED.
 

toiletmouse

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Oh8aloss, why do you think quantum materials is the company to choose from? From what I hear there losing money everyday and the contract they disired for a coglomerate has been snached up by a major corporation in Asia whom make quantum dots on equal scale. I'm sorry but Samsung and LG are taken so are the other major companies across Asia. Who would sighn that contract with a small company when there are larger billion dollar companies who can do more and advance in the feild of quantum dot technonlogy.you must own shares of this company to think they will be sucessful well good luck with that. K.
 

mapesdhs

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Full-gamut colour is not necessarily a good thing. It can make colours look
far too garish, especially greens, because the source material may have been
based on sRGB. Also, the no. of colours is a completely separate issue.

This is a good summary, please read:

http://www.xbitlabs.com/articles/monitors/display/samsung-sm-xl24-xl30_2.html#sect0

Hyper-colourful displays can look great in shop showrooms where the
lighting is so bright, but in a normal living room they present one with
an image that looks like something one would see if thoroughly high.

Full-gamut displays won't look right until the source material is created
taking a wider colourspace into account. Same problem with computer
outputs, few OSs understand how to manage a wide gamut correctly
(does Windows yet? Not sure...)

For some good example comments relating to these issues, check
reviews of the HP ZR24W IPS monitor, how it compares to the HP
LP2475W. The ZR24W has a narrower colourspace, but for many this
is a good thing:

http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/reviews/hp_zr24w.htm
http://techreport.com/blog/18996/hp-zr24w-oh-srgb-let-never-fight-again

Techreport nails it IMO.

And more immersive gaming?? No thanks, I already can't stand the hyper-neon
look of so many modern FPS games, with explosions & weapon blasts stuffed
full of ridiculous purple, yellow and other crazy colours. I long for games to return
to the more sensible gritty visual realism of even an old game like PS2 Mercenaries,
or FC2. Immersion comes from a believable world with engaging behaviour & function,
not whacko visuals that strain the eyeballs. See this article for relevant examples.

Ian.

 

InvalidError

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OLED displays may eventually become inkjet or silkscreen printable. As an emissive technology, OLED has no RGB filters, no polarization filters, no backlight, no diffuser, no light guide, etc. which allows making them almost arbitrarily thin, enables orders of magnitude better blacks and eliminates the possibility of light bleed.

Personally, I would be far more interested in the 100-1000X better contrast ratio and no light bleed of OLED than slightly better color gamut of QDot.

I'd say there are still plenty of very good reasons to continue research into OLED, LEP and similar technologies. OLED is alive and doing quite well on small displays.
 

Doug Lord

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OLED is great for inky blacks but it has a much harder time with HDR and Rec 2020. When you see a REAL UHD TV (Next CES) running 2,000+ nits and 90%+ of rec 2020, you will forget about OLED. TVs With 500+ local dimming zones will provide good enough blacks.
 

zodiacfml

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Why are they comparing it to OLED...probably the cost to license is extremely high. They have to move fast and be reasonable in licensing. Quantom dot is good to extend the life of LCD technology but OLED is just technologically superior.

Quantom dot tech should be perfect in cheap laptops with their cheap, bluish displays. Yes, I researched about the technology and it is fairly simple.
 

KidHorn

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OLED is great for inky blacks but it has a much harder time with HDR and Rec 2020. When you see a REAL UHD TV (Next CES) running 2,000+ nits and 90%+ of rec 2020, you will forget about OLED. TVs With 500+ local dimming zones will provide good enough blacks.
LG claims their new OLED lineup can handle HDR and rec 2020 just fine.
 

haftarun8

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OLED is great for inky blacks but it has a much harder time with HDR and Rec 2020. When you see a REAL UHD TV (Next CES) running 2,000+ nits and 90%+ of rec 2020, you will forget about OLED. TVs With 500+ local dimming zones will provide good enough blacks.
LG claims their new OLED lineup can handle HDR and rec 2020 just fine.
Agreed, I have never heard anywhere that OLED had any trouble covering the entirety of the REC 2020 color spec. If anything OLED's color gamut surpasses anything the venerable CRT, LCD and Plasma have ever been capable of displaying. Quantum Dots are a last ditch effort to extend LCD's color space capabilities into the territory that OLED has been capable of from the very beginning.

The ONLY limitations of OLED thus far has been overall brightness output, which is already being solved in the labs and on smaller displays (The Galaxy Note 4's OLED screen surpassed all existing LCDs on competing phones in total brightness, not to mention still having infinite contrast when cranked to that level), and manufacturing costs, which will come down and eventually be CHEAPER to manufacture than LCDs in time. I'm sick of temporary early developmental issues of OLED being wrongly touted as permanent limitations of the technology - that is false information and will go away sooner if consumers would educate themselves and embrace and invest in the technology instead of trying to bury it prematurely.
 
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