Directv signal disruptions from bad weather really a problem? (question revised)

rogbngp

Estimable
Oct 11, 2014
1
0
4,510
0
I'm considering switching from the Cablevision/Optimum's triple play to Directv/just Optimum Online Internet/magicJack Plus. The main reservation I have is whether there will be any significant signal disruption from rain or snow storms. From what I'm reading, as long as the dish is accurately aimed at the right point in the sky, and the signal strength is above 90% it seems the signal disruption should be rare and minor...

If you have experience using Directv, how often do you have signal problems when its raining or snowing?

I guess if the satellite signal is disrupted my family can watch Amazon Prime, Netflix, or Hulu Plus using our Roku--which connects via our Optimum Online... Not the end of the world... But I don't want to have to worry about having to do this if it's just a rainy day!
 

mctylr

Distinguished
Dec 21, 2010
2
0
18,520
1
A well pointed dish with a clear line of sight (i.e. not through the leaves of a tree, or other obstruction) to the satellite should have a strong signal with over 80+% signal strength. Obstructions such as tall buildings, and trees are the most common sources of permanent blockage that can prevent a clear signal.

To check for a clear line of sight (which I do suggest before you order) go to a web site like DishPointer or one of the umpteen apps to check what direction and angle (azimuth and elevation) is requires for a dish at your location.

Normal rain fall is not sufficient to interfere with a strong signal, but a heavy downpour, freezing rain, medium to heavy snow fall, or moderate to heavy lightning activity can all disrupt the signal, ranging from a fraction of a second of blockiness (thanks MPEG) to complete signal lost for 20-60 minutes.

I don't know about locations such as Alaska or Hawaii, check with DirectTV for more information.
 

mctylr

Distinguished
Dec 21, 2010
2
0
18,520
1
A well pointed dish with a clear line of sight (i.e. not through the leaves of a tree, or other obstruction) to the satellite should have a strong signal with over 80+% signal strength. Obstructions such as tall buildings, and trees are the most common sources of permanent blockage that can prevent a clear signal.

To check for a clear line of sight (which I do suggest before you order) go to a web site like DishPointer or one of the umpteen apps to check what direction and angle (azimuth and elevation) is requires for a dish at your location.

Normal rain fall is not sufficient to interfere with a strong signal, but a heavy downpour, freezing rain, medium to heavy snow fall, or moderate to heavy lightning activity can all disrupt the signal, ranging from a fraction of a second of blockiness (thanks MPEG) to complete signal lost for 20-60 minutes.

I don't know about locations such as Alaska or Hawaii, check with DirectTV for more information.
 
Thread starter Similar threads Forum Replies Date
D Streaming Video & TVs 2
M Streaming Video & TVs 2
F Streaming Video & TVs 1
N Streaming Video & TVs 3
L Streaming Video & TVs 3
S Streaming Video & TVs 3
T Streaming Video & TVs 2
W Streaming Video & TVs 1
D Streaming Video & TVs 1
D Streaming Video & TVs 2
S Streaming Video & TVs 1
A Streaming Video & TVs 1
F Streaming Video & TVs 1
S Streaming Video & TVs 4
C Streaming Video & TVs 1
M Streaming Video & TVs 2
D Streaming Video & TVs 7
J Streaming Video & TVs 1
G Streaming Video & TVs 1
G Streaming Video & TVs 5

ASK THE COMMUNITY