Help me reduce load on an amplifier?

Tom98

Commendable
Jan 28, 2017
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1,510
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My friend and I are constantly getting blamed for our music distorting at high volumes at parties we host. Without having to invest in new equipment, is there a particular setup that will reduce the load on an amp and allow it to perform at higher volumes for longer? We usually have 2 amplifiers and substitute them when one gets hot and starts distorting, which is annoying. Between us we have 4 floorstanding speakers, each with an impedance of 4-8 Ohms. The main amplifier has four channels, and we are wondering if there is a specific way of wiring up the speakers in a way to reduce the load on the amplifier? The amplifier isn't hugely powerful, around 80w I think. Thanks!
 
IF the Sony can be bridged it would produce more power into two speakers. Does it have a switch to do that? If not then you can't.
It would be less stable when bridged so if it's only stable into 4 ohms in 4 channel it will only be stable into 8 ohms in 2 channel. Might shut down or blow up with less.
Problem is you are using home audio equipment when you really need pro audio gear. DJ speakers are meant to play very loud and are efficient so they don't need as much power to do so.
You can use a home amp on DJ speakers so that would be the first upgrade I would suggest. Better than trying to max out the home speakers. You would be likely to blow them with more power.
 

getochkn

Splendid
Moderator
Why not 2 speakers per amp instead of 4 speakers on one amp until it gets too hot and than you switch them out?

Or

Buy better amps. If you're hosting parties, 80W doesn't go far is like the output of an old ghetto blaster. My last house with our mancave/party room/dance floor area, we probably had 600w of consumer level gear and when I used to DJ even small private parties, I would rent like 2000w in amps and speakers.
 

getochkn

Splendid
Moderator
MERGED QUESTION
Question from Tom98 : "How can I reduce amplifier distortion?"



 

c4s2k3

Estimable
Sep 17, 2015
18
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4,570
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I'm not sure there is much to be done without:
A. Buying an amp with enough power and headroom to handle the situation
B. Buying highly efficient speakers, if the ones you have are not
C. Preferably, both of the above

None of these solutions are particularly cheap. I don't consider myself an audiophile but I've always been pretty mindful of B when buying equipment for home and have yet to be disappointed.
 

USAFRet

Splendid
Moderator


It sounds like you simply need better equipment.
But since we have no idea of what you actually have, that is just a guess.
 

getochkn

Splendid
Moderator
Turn down the volume=less load on the speakers.

You're like looking for concert level sound from an alarm clock, and thus want to defy the laws of physics. Next house party tell everyone to throw in $10 to cover new equipment so they quit complaining.
 

Tom98

Commendable
Jan 28, 2017
4
0
1,510
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1x Cambridge Audio Topaz AM5
1x 80w 4 Channel Sony amp (don't know exact model, my friend owns it)
2x Tibo Edge 200 speakers
2x Wharfedale Floorstander speakers (again, I don't own these)

 
IF the Sony can be bridged it would produce more power into two speakers. Does it have a switch to do that? If not then you can't.
It would be less stable when bridged so if it's only stable into 4 ohms in 4 channel it will only be stable into 8 ohms in 2 channel. Might shut down or blow up with less.
Problem is you are using home audio equipment when you really need pro audio gear. DJ speakers are meant to play very loud and are efficient so they don't need as much power to do so.
You can use a home amp on DJ speakers so that would be the first upgrade I would suggest. Better than trying to max out the home speakers. You would be likely to blow them with more power.
 

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