Is the canon 750D worth it?

Tom900

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Dec 17, 2015
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Looking at taking amazing photos and use for videos, we have a budget of around £500 is the 750d worth it?
 

Hello man

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Aug 11, 2013
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The goo news is for video, canon has Green Lantern (look it up) firmware hacks which allow higher quality video to be captured and some of the recording limits to be removed. You could solve this down the road with an external recorder.

Anyways. In terms of photography, Bicycle Repair Man is correct. You need to figure out what you want to do. I shoot a lot of sports. I have a 300mm F/4, a 70-200mm F/2.8 and a 28mm F/1.8. The most sports specific lens of those is the 300mm, which I finally bought once I started doing a lot of that. Prior to it, I bought more versatile lenses.

More importantly, the camera won't make you take amazing photos. It is the most frustrating thing when I meet people and have them say; "well it can't be that hard with thousands of dollars in gear, I could take a photo like that". A skilled photographer with a bad camera can take a better photo than a noob with a $56,000 Alpa Phase One 100 megapixel medium format camera. Get a camera and a decent lens (or a kit lens if you are stuck with that) and learn to use it. Make that thing an extension of your body. Fill your SD card every week. Be harshly critical of your own work.
 

bicycle_repair_man

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Jan 10, 2014
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Also don't forget a tripod and flashgun, depending on what you want to shoot.

You need to ascertain what type of photography you want to do and then go out and try a few cameras. Yes, the 750D is a good camera, but will the button layout frustrate you? Will it be comfortable to hold?

You should know that cameras sold in the EU are restricted to 30 minutes of video recording; no ifs, no buts.

Another consideration is that when you buy a camera you also buy into a system of lenses and accessories. If you buy Canon gear it's very difficult and expensive to switch to another brand.
 

Hello man

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Aug 11, 2013
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The goo news is for video, canon has Green Lantern (look it up) firmware hacks which allow higher quality video to be captured and some of the recording limits to be removed. You could solve this down the road with an external recorder.

Anyways. In terms of photography, Bicycle Repair Man is correct. You need to figure out what you want to do. I shoot a lot of sports. I have a 300mm F/4, a 70-200mm F/2.8 and a 28mm F/1.8. The most sports specific lens of those is the 300mm, which I finally bought once I started doing a lot of that. Prior to it, I bought more versatile lenses.

More importantly, the camera won't make you take amazing photos. It is the most frustrating thing when I meet people and have them say; "well it can't be that hard with thousands of dollars in gear, I could take a photo like that". A skilled photographer with a bad camera can take a better photo than a noob with a $56,000 Alpa Phase One 100 megapixel medium format camera. Get a camera and a decent lens (or a kit lens if you are stuck with that) and learn to use it. Make that thing an extension of your body. Fill your SD card every week. Be harshly critical of your own work.
 

GarryH_Geek

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Yes, the 750D is a trustworthy camera if you are fixed on Canon. But it is completely a matter of personal purposes, as said before. I sold my Canon 6D and take Fujifilm X-E2 with a 35mm lens, which did not impair quality of my photos and brought me many options for shooting where I can't risk to shoot with the bulky 6D! Moreover, my new Samsung NX Mini with a 9mm wide (a 24mm equivalent on a film) can do as many as 85% of my daily photo job for me. Therefore, the main question is what you need as "amazing photos"; maybe a 750D can serve you as the best camera on the world, and maybe, you will not be satisfied.

These are my recommendations: buy 750D if you like Canon colors (this is a specific matter!) and do not need for some quick changes in your settings before each shoot (which is true for such areas as soprt and wild animal photography)! If you plan to shoot fast targets in a quickly changing environment, this is more reasonable to buy a used camera with a top display and more manual controlling functions. And if you are planning shooting at streets or take travel photos, then your choice can be a bit lower camera (like a 600D or a 700D) with 24mm and/or 40mm pancake(s) to bring you more portability with better quality.

Best regards!
 

Fran_MontoyaQ

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Jun 29, 2016
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Well there is almost every time the need to shoot in the largest possible photo size. RAW images contain just way more data for editing your pictures and more megapixel in the sensor can also extract more sharpens out of a given lens.
 

13thmonkey

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Thanks.
 
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