New Board "burn in" question

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I have a 24 track project studio in my basement recording my band and
a few friends' bands. It is not a money-making operation, and is used
only a few hours each week. I am buying a new tracking/mixing deck.

How long do you all leave a new piece of electronics powered up for a
"burn in" to get past the infant mortality phase? I've read with PC's
that most inherent problems will show themselves in the first 100
hours of use.

I have never worried about "burn in" because I have never had any
equipment fail (knock on wood) except for a few instances when failure
was almost immediate or only after many years. (I have a Kustom bass
rig still going strong that was new in 1968. Ditto for a Magnatone
M-10).

For a non-commercial studio used only a few hours each week, would you
leave things powered up, or would you turn things off in between
sessions? Cost of electricity is not an issue. I'm wondering which
approach is better for the life of the equipment.

Thanks.
 
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In article <c4e7adc0.0409110712.496de471@posting.google.com> darrelldklein@yahoo.com writes:

> How long do you all leave a new piece of electronics powered up for a
> "burn in" to get past the infant mortality phase?

Oh, about fifteen minutes should do it. There's very little "infant
mortality" in this sort of gear. What might be a good idea is to take
it apart and look for signs of shipping damage like loose connectors
or socketed chips not fully seated.

> For a non-commercial studio used only a few hours each week, would you
> leave things powered up, or would you turn things off in between
> sessions?

We go around with this every year or so. Under normal environmental
conditions, there's no need to keep gear powered up all the time. If
you're going to be working on and off during the day, I'd leave it on,
but more for convenience than anything else. Turn it off when you go
to bed.



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Derrell wrote
>I have a 24 track project studio in my basement recording my band and
>a few friends' bands. It is not a money-making operation, and is used
>only a few hours each week. I am buying a new tracking/mixing deck.
>
>How long do you all leave a new piece of electronics powered up for a
>"burn in" to get past the infant mortality phase? I've read with PC's
>that most inherent problems will show themselves in the first 100
>hours of use.
>
>I have never worried about "burn in" because I have never had any
>equipment fail (knock on wood) except for a few instances when failure
>was almost immediate or only after many years. (I have a Kustom bass
>rig still going strong that was new in 1968. Ditto for a Magnatone
>M-10).
>
>For a non-commercial studio used only a few hours each week, would you
>leave things powered up, or would you turn things off in between
>sessions? Cost of electricity is not an issue. I'm wondering which
>approach is better for the life of the equipment.

Turn it off.
 
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Darrell Klein wrote:
> I have a 24 track project studio in my basement recording my band and
> a few friends' bands. It is not a money-making operation, and is used
> only a few hours each week. I am buying a new tracking/mixing deck.
>
> How long do you all leave a new piece of electronics powered up for a
> "burn in" to get past the infant mortality phase? I've read with PC's
> that most inherent problems will show themselves in the first 100
> hours of use.

WHy do you feel the need to do this. Just turen it on and use it. If it
breaks, it breaks, though this is hardly a common occurance these days.

> For a non-commercial studio used only a few hours each week, would you
> leave things powered up, or would you turn things off in between
> sessions? Cost of electricity is not an issue. I'm wondering which
> approach is better for the life of the equipment.

I turn stuff off. Especially stuff that generates hweat, because heat is
what can cause electrolytic capacitors to fail. I turn it on (esp power
amps) an hour before use. I am not sure that I've ever heard a difference
because of this though.

geoff
 
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"Geoff Wood" <geoff@paf.co.nz-nospam> wrote in message news>
[snip]
> WHy do you feel the need to do this. Just turen it on and use it. If it
> breaks, it breaks, though this is hardly a common occurance these days.
>

Well, of course the idea is to have the first "X" hours of use occur
within "Y" days. X being the magical mythical infant mortality average
and "Y" being the seller's exchange-for-free period or the
manufacturer's warranty period. I agree with you that this is an
uncommon occurance based on my own experience.
 

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I'd turn it off unless your basement is damp, then leave it on to keep it dry.

You want to turn it off for sure during a thunder storm.


Mark
 
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"Mark" <makolber@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:3367f36e.0409130606.76a0a29c@posting.google.com...
> I'd turn it off unless your basement is damp, then leave it on to keep it
> dry.
>
> You want to turn it off for sure during a thunder storm.


Or in caswe of flooding, move it to higher ground !


geoff
 
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