Split HDMI to coax for 2nd television

onh5

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I currently have an old Directv HR20-700 receiver. It had an output where I could run coax to a SD television in an adjoining room. If I buy a new receiver it is my understanding they do not have an output. Can you convert the HDMI that goes to my main telvision to coax for a 2nd tv?
 

VincentP

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I'm guessing the input that you are looking at on the 2nd TV is an RF input deigned for an aerial.
If it has an RCA input, this would be better.
If not, you will need an RF modulator with a hdmi or RCA input.
 
There are devices that can modulate a video signal onto a coax, but they are pricey, like more then the cost of a second direct tv receiver pricey.

Convering HDMI to coax is not like conveting say hdmi to vga. Hdmi to VGA is a simplier signal conversion. To put it onto a coax wire you not only have to convert the signal to SD, but you also have to modulate it onto a set frequency on the coax. If you remember your old VCR you would select for it to be channel 3 or 4, that is because it had to modulate the output of the VCR onto the frequency that channel 3 uses.
 


I dont think an rca input would help him since he needs to convert hdmi.


Do you have a reciever in the room with the SD TV, or are you trying to send video from the living room TV to a different TV?
If it is a receiver inthe same same room then doesnt the receiver have more then just hdmi ports out?
If the receiver is in a different room then this is even more difficult as most rf modulaters are designed to run over 3-10ft of coax to the TV, not 50+ft to go from one room to another, thus an amplifier would also have to be used.
 
The first link modulates the video stream onto the coax onto a "TV CHANNEL" that any digital tuner can pick up (so you would tune your TV to say channel 72 and you would see the stream from your living room DVR).

The second link just uses an unused frequency on the coax line to send the data on, and then has a receiver box to reconvert the signal back to hdmi.

Does that make sense?
 

onh5

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over my head. My current Directv HD receiver is connected via HDMI and it has an output that I use via coaxial cable to another television in my kitchen. The new Directv receivers do no have an output that can use coax. I want to keep the old tv in kitchen because it fits the hole in my cabinet. Is there any way to keep the 2nd tv in kitchen without running a long HDMI cable and use the same coax cable I am now using? I hope that explains better.
 
I understand what you are wanting to do.

It will be more cost effective to get a device or additional tuner from directv.

If your tv in the kitchen does not have hdmi you would still need a $300 box to convert it to RCA even after getting a long hdmi cable.
Bottom line you cant accomplish what you want without either getting more equipment fom directv or spending $600+ on equipment.
 

VincentP

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The receiver has outputs for HDMI, composite, component and s-video. HDMI is the only digital signal among these, hence any of the others would be a better choice to use as an input to a modulator. On top of that, the hdmi is already used for the first TV and hence not available for use with the second.

A coax cable can be used for any of these analog signal types (typically 50 ohm) so it is not a good description for the second TV input. This input will be an RF input requiring 75 ohm coax. The RF modulator used could just be an old VCR if coming from a composite (RCA) signal.
 

VincentP

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True, the receiver may only use one output at a time. In that case you would need some sort of splitter.

These are common as just a plug with one RCA in and two RCA out for composite video, same again for left and right audio (meaning he would have to use composite for the first TV as well).

A HDMI splitter must be an active device with a power supply and then you are back to trying to modulate an RF signal from HDMI.
 


Be quite the backwards "upgrade" to hookup his living room hd tv with RCA
 

VincentP

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There is always going to be difficulties when trying to an archaic technology like a modulated RF output with new technology like HDMI and HDTV. The term "SD TV" has been thrown around a bit on this post, but we are not talking about a standard definition digital output, going back to RF means NTSC. It will be like watching a video cassette. If the OP was in any way concerned about picture quality the CRT television would be thrown out and replaced. Compared to the CRT in the kitchen, the main TV will still look fantastic on an RCA input.
 
I get that the Kitchen TV will be low quality no matter what, but that would be a horrible waste to not only hook up RCA to a HDTV but to also pay good money (because directv isnt cheap) for hd receiver and content and then not use it at all.
 
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