Sweden Law Kicks In; 33% Traffic Drops

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crisisavatar

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People will find a way around this of that I am sure. Stop ripping legit costumers pocket with pricetags of 60 dollars for 6 hours of gameplay and in return you will get the same treatment.

I dont believe that 98% of the games in the market should go for above 40 usd, this is just like the bankers who think are entitled to millions in bonuses for not doing anything out of the ordinary ( ftr is my opinion that they will be able to make more money if they do in fact drop prices ) 30-40 bucks is where I think games should be at.
 

Maxor127

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More like "All major industries have allegedly taken a huge hit due to piracy, ranging from music to Hollywood to PC games."

I have yet to see any proof that they lose a significant amount of money, especially compared to how much they lose due to developing DRM and driving away customers with it. A game or video or song pirated isn't necessarily a sale lost.
 

JimmiG

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All this will do is create a market for, and raise awareness of, encrypted p2p transfers and services that claim to make you anonymous while online, making it even harder to catch pirates as well as pedophiles and other criminals in the future. There's no way to “end file sharing”, record companies etc. will just have to learn to live with it and find ways to make money and survive any way. Laws like this only do more damage for everyone in the end.

It's no surprise that traffic went down on the first day. The press here has been talking about this law for a long time, scaring people etc. People are stepping back to see how this develops. In a few months I expect the drop will have shrunk to 10% or less and in a year even more people will be using p2p networks than before.
 

Zoonie

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This law is BS. Nothing but BS. Fascism is obviously a part of democracy these days!

If you are going to thumb me down for this comment, do so, and then go read up on the bloody FRA and Ipred laws and how it all started. Then ask a couple of swedes if they were ever given a chance to vote or make themsleves heard against these hollywood buttlicking laws.

Bring democracy and some balls back to Sweden please!
 

demonhorde665

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[citation][nom]Zoonie[/nom]This law is BS. Nothing but BS. Fascism is obviously a part of democracy these days!If you are going to thumb me down for this comment, do so, and then go read up on the bloody FRA and Ipred laws and how it all started. Then ask a couple of swedes if they were ever given a chance to vote or make themsleves heard against these hollywood buttlicking laws.Bring democracy and some balls back to Sweden please![/citation]


it's not fascism , ithe proper word would be bueracracy , ie big buisness drops tons of money itno apolititcan's pockets so those politicians vote their way

and for there record there NEVER was a true democracy
not in teh the US sure youc an call it that , but teh actual system is set uop as a republic and reublics almost always fall prey to bueracracy.
 
G

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Soon we will have islands of encrypted underground servers where no information is contraband.

When you start putting software that MAY allow theft of intellectual property rights into the same boat as identity theft, child porn, terrorism, and cyber fraud... you are giving a very strong incentive for new technologies used for freedom of collaboration, to indirectly improve the ones used for nefarious purposes.

Brilliant!

The industry needs to change its marekting and expectations.
 

cabose369

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this is so stupid because of the cria, riaa, etc. think that by forcing people to stop downloading stuff they will increase cd sales and increase movie ticket sales they are wrong. In fact, quite the opposite will happen.

Here is an example:
I download music. I do not listen to the radio. I search the internet looking for new bands. When I see a band that looks interesting I go to my torrent site and download the music. If the band sucks I delete their cd. If I like the band I will go buy there CD. I will then go to their concert. I will buy merchandise at their concert. So right there lets assume I spend $15 (CDN prices) on the CD, $25 for the concert and $20 on a shirt. That is $60.
Now, let's say I am no longer allowed to download music torrents. I will not go and buy there CD, I will not go to their concert and I will not buy there merchandise because I will refuse to go and pay for a CD that might suck.

See this is where these stupid recording companies miss the point. In an effort to try to increase CD sales they fail to realize that they will ultimately lose in overall money spent. They would rather have me spend $0 because I can't download a CD then spend $60 if I can. Perfect logic that evades the retards at the riaa, cria, etc.
 

Snillet

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Sweden's new policy poses a significant threat to illegal file-sharers. The new law--based on the European Union's Intellectual Property Rights Enforcement Directive (IPRED)--actually allows copyright holders to force ISPs (internet service providers) into coughing up IP addresses of users sharing copyrighted material via a court order.
Well, not exactly. The law that we have in Sweden is asolutely not the IPRED-law the EU-comission once wanted.

The original IPRED-law was originally designed to protect the fashion-business (Gucci and Prada) from cheap China knock-offs.
The comission wanted the shipping companies to deliver information about the Chinese corporations producing the fake stuff.

However, there was a certain Janelly Fourtou in the EU-parlament, who lobbied that "Chinese knock-offs" is essentially the same thing as all the pirated software floating around. She also thought that "shipping solutions delivering information about the source material" is the same thing as "ISPs delivering information about their little clients."
As it turns out, she is married to the CEO of Vivendi SA, a French media-conglomerate worth 57 Billion dollars.

WARNING: Long post, grab a cup of coffee.

But there was hope, the EU-comission denied her petition since it violated the "Directive 95/46/EC on the protection of personal data", a law that actually protects the little people.

Janelly's IPRED was essentially an entirely different thing than the original IPRED, the original IPRED never said anything about chasing kids with blowtorches, well maybe Janelly's didn't either, at least in clear text.

Although, the law was actually implemented in Spain, where it failed on the first trial. Yay! We have a precedent, the law failed!

But no.

Sweden implemented something close to Janelly's IPRED two days ago.
Actually, the only active parties that opposed the law was the Swedish green party and the left. And the Pirate Party, of course.

It'll be interesting how this turns out.

Footnote: GET ME OUT OF HERE!

 

neiroatopelcc

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"who lobbied that "Chinese knock-offs" is essentially the same thing as all the pirated software floating around." As we all know, pirated software usually provides the same quality product as the original, or sometimes even a better quality due to lack of drm. As we also know, the problem with copyware gucci stuff, the actual problem is quality, not the fact that it's fake. So we all know she's wrong .... why'd she even try to make it sound legit? I'm sure even some politicians know these things.

Anyhow, I guess some day we'll have a floating dataceter island in international waters where all the copyright infringement can take place. Google's already trying to patent such an idea - though probably just to avoid having to conform to local goverments restrictions, and not for pirates to enjoy.
 

gwellin

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Is it even possible to know what information is transfered from one computer to another computer without invasion of privacy? How do they even know that the information sent is the movie "Dark Knight" or a game "GTA4" or a large video clip from there own personal camcorder? If you could find out, there would be no question how many people are downloading copywrited stuff. I have a hard time believing a ISP provider can monitor the data sent over it's network. The only way this can work is if the recording/production studio entraps the filesharer.
 

T-Bone

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Hey, I like to download music, software, etc, as much as the next guy but you do realize that this is still stealing, right? I mean, were not talking about some basic human necessity that's being withheld from the mases...this is entertainment stuff, so if you don't want to pay for it then don't get it.
 

T-Bone

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[citation][nom]gwellin[/nom]Is it even possible to know what information is transfered from one computer to another computer without invasion of privacy? How do they even know that the information sent is the movie "Dark Knight" or a game "GTA4" or a large video clip from there own personal camcorder? If you could find out, there would be no question how many people are downloading copywrited stuff. I have a hard time believing a ISP provider can monitor the data sent over it's network. The only way this can work is if the recording/production studio entraps the filesharer.[/citation]

Actually, there are many 2nd & 3rd party groups that copyright holders hire to target (illegal) downloaders. Their most popular method of detection is to install P2P file sharing programs and then attempt to download files that they've been hired to protect.
Usually, when you're downloading a file, you're also UPLOADING it as well, even if you only have a small portion of it. All of the "Torrent encryption" methods prove useless against this simple method because once you start downloading a file, all of the IP addresses that you're connected to show up, and that's how they get your IP. Then they issue a complaint to your ISP, who will respond by possibly shutting off your service.
 

blackened144

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[citation][nom]gwellin[/nom]Is it even possible to know what information is transfered from one computer to another computer without invasion of privacy? How do they even know that the information sent is the movie "Dark Knight" or a game "GTA4" or a large video clip from there own personal camcorder? If you could find out, there would be no question how many people are downloading copywrited stuff. I have a hard time believing a ISP provider can monitor the data sent over it's network. The only way this can work is if the recording/production studio entraps the filesharer.[/citation]
Its completely possible if the file transfer is not encrypted. Technically, if the file is encrypted, the government would have to break the law by breaking the encryption in order to determine what is being transferred.
 

bounty

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I find it interesting that for Pirate Bay to continue to offer their VPN service they have to charge you. Now we're in a price war. Now if iTunes and Netflix service goes up and their price down, there is less motivation to do the illegal thing. Make it expensive for them to pirate may be more effective than doing nothing. It could be a small win, for now.
 

deathblooms2k1

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How small of a win? Traffic went down 1/3. Did legit sales go up 1/3? I know I know that's not an apples to apples comparison but still if this is going to be truly effective for the corporations one would think they should see a substantial increase in sales.

I'm betting they didn't see a boost in revenue at all. Their strategy for stopping piracy is wrong. Release quality products, offer incentives for buying them, etc. and then and only then will they see a boost in revenue.

I also don't think pirate bays VPN service will be restricted for long as I'm sure other torrent sites will hop on the VPN bandwagon and offer it free of charge using ad's to offset the cost. PirateBay will then have to lose the subscription fee in order to keep it's user base. Regardless, the fact remains the law probably won't effect piracy.

Don't get me wrong I'm not advocating piracy, I think it's a form of theft, but they need to look at this issue realistically.
 
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