Bon Jovi: Steve Jobs Killed Music Industry

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bigman8291

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Buying a CD IMO is like buying a book, some books are great all the way through without a dull moment, some books have alot of crap that must be endured to reach the best parts. Introducing Itunes and digital distribution is just the next step, sure for us (who grew up saving dollars here and there just to buy one album) it seems like the heart of music is gone. It is just a new format and a new way of thinking, it seems chivalry is dead...and it very well may be... but I for one believe this is the beginning of something that will eventually benefit the music industry in a tremendous way.
 

bv90andy

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[citation][nom]Rick_Criswell[/nom]Never understood the buying of mp3 music. The quality sucks. All of the highs and lows are gone. A cd compresses the sound already to take out the upper and lower frequencies. Then the conversion to mp3 takes out even more fidelity. So music on mp3 sounds like a cheap boombox played in mono. Sound wise the mp3 is comparable to an old 8-track tape. We are going backwards in sound quality not forward.Any one remember putting sleves or magic markers on the cd edges to increase the low end bass responce of cd's when they first came out?[/citation] I have both original CDs and mp3s... I personally hear no difference between the CD in my hi-fi or a song in Winamp. Maybe my ears suck, but then many millions of people must have fucket up years.
WHat I do hear, are scraches on some old Audio CDs.
 

cirdecus

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Well, I understand where he's coming from. I remember buying CD's and cassettes and having that excitement as a kid and being able to sift through the same 4 pages of the cover of an album and listen to music, but I think he's missing the big picture of the evolution of music and what it has meant in every generation (not just his).

Some older folks remember gathering around their radio to listen to short superman or detective stories as well as music. The idea that radio music was a family event is gone. You can even say the same about silent movies and how much more imaginative the viewer had to be when watching them rather than having all of those sights and sounds fed to them through actual audio.

What he's forgetting to realize is that there will be an entire new evolution of how listeners experience music in the digital age. Just because music is going digital doesn't mean that the magic has to go away. In fact, I full expect it to continue to captivate listeners from childhood, but just in a different way that we haven't experienced yet.

As far as the current situation, those of us who enjoy collecting physical albums and wandering thought he album art can still do so. We should also be excited to see what kind of new experience our children will have with music.
 

cirdecus

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[citation][nom]MrFawlty[/nom]Er, no. I defy ANYONE to tell the difference between a well-ripped mp3, using LAME at a decent VBR bit-rate, to the original. Yes, technically, there is a difference but the human ear just isn't that sensitive. The problem lies with the equipment people play their mp3s on. From a cheap laptop using the built in sound adaptor, or a cheap mp3 player using rubbish ear-phones, the sound is bad compared to a decent hi-fi system.I know FLAC is always going to good but the file size is just too big, even with the compression.Just so you know, I am a hi-fi enthusiast and sound quality is very important to me.[/citation]

You need to understand the compression a bit more. Its is entirely possible to get the high' and lows out of a compressed mp3. Unless you're breaking the music down at the recording studio level, you will hear all of the details if you compress it correctly.
 

tburns1

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Napster and P2P filesharing killed the record industry. Stevie caught onto that wave, and with a bucket of money, legitimized it. The record industry never saw that what Stevie was doing could spell thier doom.
 

cirdecus

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I do, however, believe this was karma for the music producers. People were sick of buying an entire album for one song. It eventually was going to catch up to them. Perhaps, if they had higher standards for the albums they produced, people wouldn't have jumped on the digital bandwagon so quickly? Its like selling a holiday pack of beer filled with 19 bottles of crappy, low cost beer and 1 really good one. It isn't going to fly.
 

COLGeek

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Seems technological evolution is what has forced changes in the music industry is the actual catalyst here. The music industry needs to evolve as well or it may go the way of the dinosaur.

 

XZaapryca

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I'm sure 100 years ago some a-hole was saying that kids won't learn to play instruments now that they can listen to music on the gramophone. Why are people constantly complaining about crap changing? Change is constant. I mean, sure, you can be nostalgic about how things use to be, but why would you play the "grandpa card" and start whining about the old days.

I'll try to remember this myself when lamenting on the state of metal and how Nirvana, Alice in Chains and Pearl Jam killed it. Of course....they killed Winger, White Lion and Warrant while they were at it. Call it a wash.
 
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I think a generation from now people are going to be like "who the hell is bon jovi". Followed by a quick google search on whatever cool technology they have only to be further confused about whether its a guy, a girl, or someone being eaten by cousin itt.
 

captaincharisma

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the music industry did kill it themselves really. i remember in the 90's buying cd's that were 20 bucks and for what? only 2 or 3 good songs on 1 CD? for some i tried going to what they called single CD's where they have one 1 or 2 songs on it but they cost 5-9 bucks. come itunes where you can buy 1 song for a buck and full albums for 10.00 or less. the music industry just doesn't want to lower it prices and i wouldn't even know if they did cause there are no music stores where i live anymore.
 

MrFawlty

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[citation][nom]Cirdecus[/nom]You need to understand the compression a bit more. Its is entirely possible to get the high' and lows out of a compressed mp3. Unless you're breaking the music down at the recording studio level, you will hear all of the details if you compress it correctly.[/citation]

I do understand how compression works. In the end though, it is how the analogue signal reaches your ears that's most important, not the algorithm used to compress it and all the technical stuff.

JBJ needs to just suck it up and accept it. If he/they aren't making enough money anymore, well boo hoo. Enough other bands are doing fine. If you're not then you need to think of how to manipulate the situation you find yourself in so you can make money. He is truly one of the lucky ones - there are plenty of others who are desperately trying to get 'into the business' but fail because of greedy sad little music execs or radio station managers.
 

millerm84

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How exactly is the record industry dead? Isn't the industry still collecting money from each download? Why yes, yes they are making money from each single that is purchased not as much money as if they sold the entire album for $9-14 more but money still. And with all the money I save I go to concerts, and I usually buy a CD to get signed and a tee-shirt to reminisce in when I'm out and about, all of which the artist and his industry profit from. Personally I hate CDs, I have since the first time I heard one skip, LPs are great if you have space for them. But digital is the winner can take it anywhere and play them on almost anything sounds like a winner to me.
 

eyemaster

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Totally wrong. HMV had the right idea when they let people listen to CD's in their stores before buying it. So it started before downloadable music. People have been able to preview before the download era. The few (including me) that want to have the physical media, still can, but the masses that don't care for it don't have to waste their times doing so. This is how the market works.

we all know why the music industry failed, it's because they didn't offer what the customer wanted.
 

lradunovic77

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What Customer wanted is to download music for free. That is truth. Since Napster was killed idea of digital download stayed, an idea people like and so that's when Steve Jobs with his iTunes comes in. I will never own iPod or any similar device or use iTunes or any similar software. I'd rather start my car, drive down Avvenue and enjoy beautiful Spring Day, go to store buy CD and talk to chicks along the way. Other morons can stay home with their fat ass on chair and 0 social skills and preach about how iTunes is great.
 
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Is Jon that stupid or does he really believe his nonsense. I paid for lots of music on vinyl, tape, and CD - for what? So that I can get the one song I like and that after a few weeks you can barely hear the music above the scratches? In the past you bought an "unknown" LP of your favorite band because you hoped that they would deliver. Now, if the "favorite" band does not deliver you pay for the few songs you like and ditch the rest. These are all liars trying to squeeze more money out of you. With digital music stores came liberation from the force buy. Now we get what we pay for and even unknown bands get their chance. There are many examples of this. Last but not least, having all of your collection with you at all times on your MP3 player is just miraculous. Anybody remember the walkman?
 

Parrdacc

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"the beauty of taking your allowance money and making a decision based on the jacket, not knowing what the record sounded like, and looking at a couple of still pictures and imagining it," he told the magazine."

Beauty? You call that beauty, spending my hard earned money on an album based on looks and not on the actual music itself? No thanks. I wasted to much money on cool looking album covers only to be totally disappointed in the quality of what I got, be it the music, artist or overall number of songs for the money.
 
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Steve Jobs/iTunes didn't kill the music business. The MP3 format did. Hundreds of thousands of nerdy illegal mp3 downloaders killed the music industry. The galling thing about it is that mp3's sound crap, but you're average computer geek won't be able to tell the difference. He'll just keep on downloading albums he'll never listen to, while playing MMORPG's and not having a girlfriend.

JBJ has it right when he romanticises about buying a physical album. As long as they continue to make CD's, I'll keep buying them.
 
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