Connect USB headset to external USB hub? | Equalizer question.

Alanthor

Estimable
Mar 17, 2014
31
0
4,580
0
Hi,

Is it okay to connect a USB headset (Logitech G35) to a external USB 2.0 Hub instead than back of my pc? Would the soundquality decrease?

My knowledge about equalizer is 0, zero. I've tryed to "understand" it, but audio just isnt my thing... So, could anyone just say what values on each slider I should put, or post a pic?
 

Skylyne

Estimable
Sep 7, 2014
405
0
5,010
36
Can you connect your headset to a USB hub? Yes... but I'd only use a powered hub for that. Even then, you're not as likely to get the best performance as plugging it straight into the motherboard, or a port on your case. Hubs usually aren't designed for much more than keyboards, mice, flash drives, and so on. You can use them for more demanding items (like a headset), but it's a better idea to plug it into the motherboard.

For the EQ, just leave it flat. I also don't know if you're referring to an EQ for the mic, or for the playback in your headphones. If you want to improve the mic with an EQ, it takes a lot of trial and error to accomplish a reasonable outcome, as each microphone picks up sound differently, and the audio picked up varies on room conditions, the pitch of your voice, how far away from your mouth the mic is, and so on. If you have problems with getting your voice to come in clearly, just start playing around with the EQ and see what works. If you're referring to an EQ for the audio playback, then keep it flat. You might find some minor tweaking to help improve the overall experience during gaming/etc., but this will also take a lot of trial and error to figure out what frequency ranges you will need to tweak. Unless you have a good ear for this kind of thing, it will be a very time consuming task. I should also add that someone else's EQing might work for them, but not for you, as everyone has their own preference on how things should sound.

EQ Basics: lower frequencies are the bass tones, and higher frequencies are the trebles. moving them up/down will increase/decrease the sensitivity of each frequency range according to the slider. For example, if you moved a "20 Hz" slider to +2, it would increase the 20Hz frequency range by 2 decibels, which then gives a heavier, bass-ier sound. The Pre-amp should only be touched if you need to change the overall volume (very unlikely, unless you're heavily tweaking the EQ). If you have other options, like compression, just ignore it. That's even more fun stuff for audio nerds, and bigger headaches for someone new to this.
 

Skylyne

Estimable
Sep 7, 2014
405
0
5,010
36
Can you connect your headset to a USB hub? Yes... but I'd only use a powered hub for that. Even then, you're not as likely to get the best performance as plugging it straight into the motherboard, or a port on your case. Hubs usually aren't designed for much more than keyboards, mice, flash drives, and so on. You can use them for more demanding items (like a headset), but it's a better idea to plug it into the motherboard.

For the EQ, just leave it flat. I also don't know if you're referring to an EQ for the mic, or for the playback in your headphones. If you want to improve the mic with an EQ, it takes a lot of trial and error to accomplish a reasonable outcome, as each microphone picks up sound differently, and the audio picked up varies on room conditions, the pitch of your voice, how far away from your mouth the mic is, and so on. If you have problems with getting your voice to come in clearly, just start playing around with the EQ and see what works. If you're referring to an EQ for the audio playback, then keep it flat. You might find some minor tweaking to help improve the overall experience during gaming/etc., but this will also take a lot of trial and error to figure out what frequency ranges you will need to tweak. Unless you have a good ear for this kind of thing, it will be a very time consuming task. I should also add that someone else's EQing might work for them, but not for you, as everyone has their own preference on how things should sound.

EQ Basics: lower frequencies are the bass tones, and higher frequencies are the trebles. moving them up/down will increase/decrease the sensitivity of each frequency range according to the slider. For example, if you moved a "20 Hz" slider to +2, it would increase the 20Hz frequency range by 2 decibels, which then gives a heavier, bass-ier sound. The Pre-amp should only be touched if you need to change the overall volume (very unlikely, unless you're heavily tweaking the EQ). If you have other options, like compression, just ignore it. That's even more fun stuff for audio nerds, and bigger headaches for someone new to this.
 
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