converting 3.5mm to split channel banana

Jul 1, 2018
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I swear I can't find the answer to this question and maybe it is because I don't understand what to ask for.

I have a stereo system that uses a Phillips Receiver box which produces a two-wire combination for each speaker. The speaker distribution box has 12 banana plugs for six speakers. The center speaker has its own direct connection and is not part of the banana distribution box.

What I'd like to do is replace the Receiver box with direct connections into my computers 7.1 sound card (and Asus sound card). Effectively, I need to split the front left/right 3.5mm plug into four different wires, ending with a front left(two pairs) and a front right(two pairs). Better if it ends with banana plugs.

How do I do this? Or, what is the correct way?
 

cryoburner

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Oct 8, 2011
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The problem comes down to what ElectrO_90 said. The receiver is likely pushing a lot more power to the speakers than what a sound card can provide. For larger speaker systems, the ports on the soundcard are intended to send a lower-power signal to the receiver, which in turn gets amplified.

Exactly what model numbers are your receiver and sound card? There might be another way to get surround output to the receiver.
 

ElectrO_90

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Jun 21, 2016
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The bit I am confused with here, does the cable go to a Speaker or between 2 devices?
If it goes to a speaker, then it is amplified already.
Speakers need amplification and the signal that comes from a computer generally isn't a lot.
 
Jul 1, 2018
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Currently, I am using the digital optical output from the computer into the Phillips receiver. The receiver then sends out 16 wires to the speakers/subwoofer. This has the side effect that I'm sending 2 channel audio and not using the 7.1 sound from the dedicated sound card for the speakers.

What I'd like to do is send the 7.1 audio from the computer directly to the speakers without the receiver box. That means I need to convert one plug from the sound card into a split channel front left/right and then split it again for the two speaker wires.

At least that what I think I need to do. Just don't know the best way to go about doing that.

I take a new receiver which accepts the inputs from the computer would work, but before doing that I'd like to try the sound card directly.

 

cryoburner

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Oct 8, 2011
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The problem comes down to what ElectrO_90 said. The receiver is likely pushing a lot more power to the speakers than what a sound card can provide. For larger speaker systems, the ports on the soundcard are intended to send a lower-power signal to the receiver, which in turn gets amplified.

Exactly what model numbers are your receiver and sound card? There might be another way to get surround output to the receiver.
 

ElectrO_90

Commendable
Jun 21, 2016
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I think you need to buy an Amplifier if you are trying to get 7.1
Good amps aren't cheap, but there are ways around it with several smaller amps.
Depends on what your speakers are rated at. Can you give any clue as to what your speaker models are and that Philips system?
Power is needed to advise more.
 
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