Does bitdefender free AV have real time protection?

rowdymoody

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Jan 16, 2013
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Yes virus shield is real time protection.
 

rowdymoody

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I only ever use Microsoft Security Essentials, and Malwarebytes free version.

Those two combined, along with smart browsing have kept my PC good and clean for years.
 
Oct 25, 2014
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Please stay on topic
 
Oct 25, 2014
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So I'm guessing virus shield is the same thing as real time protection?
 

rowdymoody

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Yes virus shield is real time protection.
 
Oct 25, 2014
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Thank you for the answer

 

MarkW

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BD does have real time checking. Even so, in that article I linked awhile ago, TomGuide suggested everyone use the free version of Malwarebytes for added protection.

 

Skylyne

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Sep 7, 2014
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A little comment on BD's free AV/ with live scanning...

I ran a small test run with it, attempting to trip it up by using the EICAR virus test files. I wasn't able to get a virus past BD, even if I tried doing 3x or 4x zip compression of a test virus. Now, that may have changed, or it could have been a one off thing, but it definitely knows how to find a virus that's trying to hide. In fact, double layered zip/compression is considered somewhat an industry standard, apparently. Can't remember where I heard that, though.

So yes, it does have a live scanner, and it is effective. I can definitely vouch for that. If anyone wants to test it, you can download the test files via Google. Just search EICAR test virus, and download them from the EICAR website. They're absolutely harmless files, but they're designed to mimic code that would trigger a response from an AV software. If you want to recreate my testing, just download the main EICAR test file, then make compressed copies; compress it once, copy it, compress the copy a second time, and repeat until you have the raw .txt file, and four compressed copies (compressed once up to four times). Then either scan them, or see if the live scanner catches them all. BD should catch all five files without any action from your part. Again, this was my experience. If it doesn't work for you, I'd love to here it, or see some screenshots. PM with different results ;)
 
Oct 25, 2014
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Wow I thought BD's free AV claims were BS but seeing your results though other people's may vary, it does an actual good job...I also feel like its a little underrated too at the same time considering that this AV wasn't listed as the top AV's this year in most reviews (For example, this article http://www.tomsguide.com/us/best-antivirus,review-2588-5.html) *Article doesn't show BD for some reason and wastes its time on Window defender/MSE* (an AV that is useless at this point IMHO)
 

Skylyne

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I've never read what BD claims, since I usually don't care to listen to the marketing hype that's usually plastered everywhere. When it comes to actual protection, though, both my testing and AVC's testing have been nothing but great results. Sure, they recently had some false alarms that included two digitally signed packages, but writing code to prevent false alarms in general takes a lot of time. Some shit will get missed. Plus, one of them was a Google package, which made me laugh so hard. I already stick it to Google when I can, so that report made my day.

I'll be running a second test, with a different install of Win7 within the next day or so. I'll post up results when I have the chance, since I'm curious how deep the compression game goes before BD doesn't pick it up any more.
 

Skylyne

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Sep 7, 2014
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Had the spare time to run a miniature test right now, and I'm kind of intrigued with what happened.


So, let's recap what happened after I turned off BD:

I have the basic Eicar test file, and the basic EICAR text file, and no other test files used. I put the text file into 7z compression, and did another layer of 7z compression to make a double compressed file (which is much harder to located). I kept the standard DOS files in the zipped folders that came straight off the EICAR website. I then labelled everything, and turned BD back on.

What I find interesting is that BD found the originals, and the two zipped files, but absolutely nothing noteworthy in the 7z compressed folders. While 7z compression isn't extremely common, it is a very attractive compression for those who are trying to save space. As you all can see, BD only recognises four of the six test files/folders as having an "infection", though it does make the note that they are not viruses. You will also notice that the 7z files gave no indication that there was a potential payload, and went by without raising any alarm.

Now, before anyone raises an alarm, this is exactly how I performed the test:
- Reactivate the on-demand scanner
- Reactive virus shield
- Navigate to the folder
- Watch BD pick up 4/6 of the test files as malicious

I did a manual scan on the remaining 7z compressed folders, and BD picked them up. I'll be leaving within fifteen minutes, or I'd do even more testing; however, I figured this was enough to put out for every to see. This is extremely basic testing, and took me about 10 minutes to complete (writing this takes longer). Feel free to run this test yourselves, and report any different results. As you can see, EICAR files are harmless, and pose no genuine threat (then again, I'm some dude on the internet lol).

I think this will be food for some interesting testing. I do wonder why BD didn't pick up on the 7z files with the virus shield, but I don't know if a payload could be delivered with a 7z file in the same way one would deliver it with a compressed file. Depending on how it's done, and the potential threat posed, you could probably just scan it immediately after downloading, to prevent an infection from spreading.

Also, a little FYI: if you download the EICAR test files from eicar.org, and your browser blocks the download, don't get scared. I'd recommend navigating to their download page, disabling your AV, download, set up your test, and then enable your AV. Unless your computer is already prone to infection, you should have no worries about running this test; it is harmless, and by having these test files on your computer there is no way they will cause an infection.
 
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