ComputerWhiz305

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Jun 25, 2014
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I got a complete PC tuneup done at my local computer store for $75.
My computer runs great!

I have used a file recovery software to recover all of the programs that he used to tune my computer and they appear to all have been free programs.

The programs were:

  • ■ CCleaner
    ■ Malwarebytes Anti-Malware
    ■ SUPERAntiSpyware Free Edition
    ■ Spybot - Search & Destroy
    ■ AVG AntiVirus Free Edition 2014
    ■ Defraggler
Since this is the only local store in my town, I was thinking about starting a small PC tuneup business out of my house. I think that I will charge $25 since the programs are free and since the software runs itself.

My first question is, would anyone recommend any other software (must be freeware)?

Secondly, for the ideal tuneup results, what order should I run these programs in?
This is the order that I have so far:

    ■ Windows Updates
    ■ Driver Errors
    ■ CCleaner
    ■ CCleaner (Wipe Free Space)
    ■ Malwarebytes Anti-Malware
    ■ SUPERAntiSpyware Free Edition
    ■ AVG AntiVirus Free Edition 2014
    ■ Spybot - Search & Destroy
    ■ Defraggler

Is this the best way to do it?
 

notherdude

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Jul 18, 2006
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"I am an experienced programmer and have programed multiple games, websites and other software.
I also specialize in administration.

I have however been a top contributor for Mozilla for 2 years. True this was mostly software technology, but some standard computer skills came in handy"

This is actually good, it is clear you have some of the pieces in place. To be an actual PC technician you need more of them. Hanging out here and following threads from start to solution is a great way to learn. Watching youtube videos about building/repairing/upgrading PCs is great. Building your own PC is a great way to learn. It takes time and experience, like any other hobby or profession.

 

notherdude

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Jul 18, 2006
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Well, here is the problem, those programs can sometimes help if and only if you have malware on your PC, the so-called cleaning of free space and dead registry entries and even defragging (which is handled automatically by the OS these days and was always over-rated to begin with) is mostly BS but has been unconscionably sold to people who think it will work miracles fixing their PC.

And suppose there are deeper problems? Without a very strong background as a PC technician, which, no offense, it is pretty obvious you are not, you won't be able to actually diagnose, fix, or even advise beyond what these free programs anybody can install will do automatically. I do not think you are qualified for even the $25 fee, to be honest. But at least $25 is cheap enough, so go ahead if you really want to, in some cases you might actually do some good.

EDIT: Sorry, if I sounded harsh but there are lots of BS sites and packages selling this kind of thing for sometimes a whole lot of money. If you insist on doing it you might want to add an automatic driver updater. Be advised, some of these programs can end up damaging a PC if used mindlessly.
 

natedawg72

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Oct 15, 2012
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I'd just like to note that if a client's PC uses a solid state drive for storage (SSD) you should not run Defraggler.

I'm pretty much in agreement with notherdude as well. The effectiveness of these programs at improving the PC are a mixed bag at best.
 

ComputerWhiz305

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Jun 25, 2014
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If the programs that I have listed above don't normally speed up/tune up a system, any ideas what else he installed to fix my issue?
 

natedawg72

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Oct 15, 2012
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The effectiveness of those programs is dependent on the existence of things like malware and viruses being present on the PC, along with it generally being poorly maintained on the operating system side. Having a slow hard drive helps too.

For a computer that isn't infected with malware the benefits would be pretty small, if noticeable at all.
 

ComputerWhiz305

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Jun 25, 2014
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It is true that I am not from the computer repair industry, though it is the world that I desperately want to be in.
I am an experienced programmer and have programed multiple games, websites and other software.
I also specialize in administration.

I have however been a top contributor for Mozilla for 2 years. True this was mostly software technology, but some standard computer skills came in handy.
I have been practicing my computer hardware repair skills. Yesterday I did a tuneup of my mother's old PC. It is 11 years old and is running with 700MB of RAM. I did a pretty good job in getting it to run fast and got it to go faster than my mother's current computer which has better specifications. This tuneup included opening the case and removing components for cleaning.
Do you have any suggestions for things that I could do to help my skills?
 

notherdude

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Jul 18, 2006
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Most likely you had some running malware. That will slow a PC way down. Malware gets in to PCs all the time despite running resident anti-virus programs and dedicated detection and removal programs like Malwarebytes and Spybot can work wonders removing it .That much of your plan will actually work, if Malware is the problem, and admittedly it is a common problem on poorly maintained Windows PCs. Updating drivers can also make an impact. Updating Windows itself, browser versions, and other software like flash playe,r for example, that the user may have deferred can make the PC faster and safer. Blowing dust out of the case and heatsinks is a good thing. Beyond that the notion of a 'tune up' is kind of a myth. It isn't all bad and $25 is reasonable I just think doing this kind of thing should be left to those with a lot of PC troubleshooting in their experience.
 

notherdude

Distinguished
Jul 18, 2006
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"I am an experienced programmer and have programed multiple games, websites and other software.
I also specialize in administration.

I have however been a top contributor for Mozilla for 2 years. True this was mostly software technology, but some standard computer skills came in handy"

This is actually good, it is clear you have some of the pieces in place. To be an actual PC technician you need more of them. Hanging out here and following threads from start to solution is a great way to learn. Watching youtube videos about building/repairing/upgrading PCs is great. Building your own PC is a great way to learn. It takes time and experience, like any other hobby or profession.

 
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