True 120hz Panel TV - PC won't allow past 60hz

ChronicleMe

Estimable
Oct 6, 2014
11
0
4,570
2
Ok all, I have seen similar questions on this forum. However none that have discussed a 120hz panel tv. I have seen several with 60hz tv's with "fake" 120hz setups. The (fake) 120hz setups that slide frames in to increase from 60 -120 are almost always on 60hz panels. Which means that if you compare a TV that has a 120Hz of real refresh rate (120hz panel) vs a 120Hz (fake), the real 120Hz is most likely better.

My question: why is it that when I connect my true 120hz tv (it has a 120hz panel and NOT a 60hz panel) I only get options to 60p & 60i in my computer's resolution settings?

My TV is a Sharp LC-42LB261U

For some more info regarding how TV mfgs dupe consumers, take what Samsung does for example:
A refresh rate is how many times per second the image can change on the screen. A higher refresh rate basically means that when the scene moves fast, you will see less motion blur.

Samsung advertises (120hzCMR)
The Clear Motion Rate metric was invented by Samsung (seems like a marketing gimmick), to represent better the clarity of movement. The refresh rate alone isn't sufficient to represent the motion blur, so on top of it they added the image processor rate as well as the back-light speed. Samsung is often misleading because it will sometimes only display the CMR instead of the real refresh rate of the panel. This makes it a lot more confusing when comparing TVs across brand, where you better compare the real refresh rate.
 

ChronicleMe

Estimable
Oct 6, 2014
11
0
4,570
2


This is the information I have from Sharp's manual regarding my TV and the hz http://www.sharpusa.com/~/media/413FC3A08354426294E9B7553431FAF9.ashx

It says on the specs "Panel: 60hz vs 120hz - 120hz Panel"

Also on my box and all of the literature that the TV came with it says "120hz panel". I find it odd that the link from Sharp you posted does in fact state 60hz when everything I have and other links from Sharp state 120hz...

hmmmm

 

Eximo

Distinguished
Herald
What are you using as a cable? HDMI and Display port are limited to 60Hz. Latest versions support higher resolutions.

I believe there are a few hacks out there that solve this, but it is unreliable based on the versions of HDMI and Display Port available.

If the TV has a DVI port, that may offer frequencies above 60Hz.
 

ChronicleMe

Estimable
Oct 6, 2014
11
0
4,570
2


This is the information I have from Sharp's manual regarding my TV and the hz http://www.sharpusa.com/~/media/413FC3A08354426294E9B7553431FAF9.ashx

It says on the specs "Panel: 60hz vs 120hz - 120hz Panel"

Also on my box and all of the literature that the TV came with it says "120hz panel". I find it odd that the link from Sharp you posted does in fact state 60hz when everything I have and other links from Sharp state 120hz...

hmmmm

 

ChronicleMe

Estimable
Oct 6, 2014
11
0
4,570
2


Thanks for your reply... I am using HDMI.

I am also not getting the "sharpest" picture... It seems kind of washed out even though it is a 1080p tv.
 

Davey Pants

Estimable
Dec 26, 2014
1
0
4,510
0


I am buying this tv tomorrow, trading UP my RCA i got at Best Buy about 3 wks ago for $250. I was just gonna ask about the washed-out quality, are you using a digital cable box with it? I noticed when i swapped out my old box for pure digital even the lowly RCA, the quality improved at least 100%, if not 300%. And at any rate, i'm not gonna worry too much about if the 120 vs 60hz is a scam or not, all i know is that ALL the reviews for Sharps in this class have destroyed the competition for image quality, that's all i give a shit about. And if it for some reason doesn't deliver...maybe i'll take it back and upgrade again. (though for $300, i highly doubt they'll be an issue, that's a great price.)
 

Cyrell

Estimable
Jan 2, 2015
1
0
4,510
0
I just go this tv for my xbox one, and also my pc gaming. I know it is not all of that good for pc gaming but hey the setup that i have is not the usual. Everything is wireless so that is why i am using a flascreen instead of a monitor also i am like 8 feet away from my setup. But anyhow i moved from a 4 series samsung led 720p 32 inches, and boy this tv is a relief. I felt like i defiantly got my money's worth. By the way the panel is not a true 60hz it uses motion enhancement , basically it is sort of a gimmick. Those are not real refresh rates lol they say that because it has the motion enhancer thats all. Real tv's that has more then 120hz are way far superior price wise and picture wise. You sould of got a monitor if pc gaming or a plasma for real refresh rates or coughed up a little money because spending 350 bucks you should not be looking for a lot, even though i understand and i would be pretty pissed to if they lied to me on something i was expecting. If you wan't a true 120hz you have to cough up 120hz money, and most real 120hz tv's are actually 240hz (Claim to be) but they are 120. I can see em because i use my pc and in video advanced settings it tells me how far i can push my tv refresh rates. By the way i tried ,dvi,vga, and hdmi, dvi & hdmi post the same rf rates.
 

colbey

Distinguished
Nov 14, 2010
4
0
18,510
0
no, the page you link to shows "Refresh Panel Rate: 120Hz"
and, "Power Source (Voltage/Hz): AC 120 V, 60 Hz"

NOT 60Hz refresh rate.

 

ChronicleMe

Estimable
Oct 6, 2014
11
0
4,570
2



You mean the page that bignastyid posted in his response. I stated in my post that Sharp claims that it is a 120hz panel. That looks like straight up lying on Sharp's part. They claim that it is a 120hz panel (and not a 60hz) yet from what I am seeing and everyone is stating it is only a 60hz panel with some gimmicky and creative marketing?
 

Eximo

Distinguished
Herald
The panel can have all kinds of capabilities, which is fine, but I guarantee the input is still limited to 60Hz as none of the existing HDMI standards offer more then 60Hz at any resolution.
 

ssddx

Glorious
Moderator
^ this.

if you want true 120hz/144hz (120/144max fps) for gaming then you would want a tn panel in a pc monitor rated for such.

as far as i know all televisions, regardless of whether the panel is actually 120hz capable accept only a 60hz signal and use post processing to fake faster refresh speeds. now the faking can be done by just adding in frames (which is used when you have a 120hz panel) or also by flickering the backlight (i believe this is motionflow and the other technologies). sometimes both are used together.

keep in mind that most movies are only filmed at low framerates aroudn 24fps for a cinematic effect. even a standard 60hz television is fine for displaying them. content such as soap operas and some other content are shot at 60fps but this gives them the "soap opera effect" look to them which some people do not like (even though its better, people are just used to the "look" of traditional cinema at 24fps). of course gaming is the biggest use of 60/120/144hz/fps since games can render as fast as your hardware allows.

displayport and dual-link dvi are acceptable means of transmitting a 120hz signal from a pc only. technically current hdmi technology would allow for transmission of this signal over hdmi however the chipsets on electronics currently do not support this.

given that there really is no 120fps recorded content on the market as for good quality, file sizes would be too huge and the fact that movies use the traditional 24fps for effect there is very little demand for tv makers to put support in for true 120hz input. perhaps if more and more users started using tvs for pc gaming or if future consoles took it up a notch and were powerful enough for 120hz we would see a change but until then, i'd be doubful. if anything i believe we will see more of a shift towards 2k/4k gaming on consoles and 2k/4k video before we ever see true 120hz support on tv for inputs.

there are tons of marketing gimmicks, and while they are all based on facts they are very confusing for people not familiar with technology:

*true 120hz - sure the panel may support it, but that doesnt mean you can use a 120hz input on them
*240hz/480hz/clearmotion - faked via backlight strobing, not a true 240/480hz panel
*led tv - leds are used for backlighting, the screen itself is typical lcd
*dynamic contrast - this is quite different and less important than static contrast yet since the numbers look impressive it gets listed.
*optical sound output in 5.1 - its compressed audio only, not as good as hdmi which is uncompressed
*smart tv - what they do not tell you is how limited the browser is, the limited file support you have and that when it gets outdated it is then useless
*tv panels & bit depth - this is an important piece of information which can be used to judge color accuracy yet is excluded from almost all spec sheets.

plus... many more.

while by all accounts i agree that specifications and features should be listed in plain facts only, this quite simply is not the way businesses like to operate. due to competition everyone is always out to one-up the others so often terms float around which are based in fact yet arent entirely accurate or are a bit deceptive. the sad but true reality.

i do feel bad when people buy something they think does one thing but ends up not however ultimately this is why we always tell people to do quite a bit of research before jumping in too quick.


 
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