Are these pc gaming parts compatible?

Jun 26, 2018
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I’d like to know if the pc parts in this list are compatible, and if the pc built based on these parts would not overheat on default settings (I won’t be overclocking this rig):
https://uk.pcpartpicker.com/list/pL8w3b

Here are the parts in case the link doesn’t work:
CPU: Intel - Core i7-8700K 3.7GHz
CPU Cooler: Corsair - H60 (2018) 57.2 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler
Motherboard: MSI - Z370I GAMING PRO CARBON AC Mini ITX LGA1151 Motherboard
Memory: Corsair - Vengeance LPX 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3200 Memory
Storage:
1- Samsung - 970 Evo 250GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive
2- Seagate - Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive
Video Card: MSI - GeForce GTX 1070 Ti 8GB Video Card
Case: Cooler Master - Elite 130 Mini ITX Tower Case
Power Supply: Corsair - TXM Gold 650W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply

Extra fans for the case (replacement fans):
1- Cooler Master - R4-S8R-20AK-GP 28.9 CFM 80mm Fan
2- Cooler Master - MasterFan Pro 120 Air Balance 83.1 CFM 120mm Fan
 
Solution
Let's look at it this way, the case is the issue when trying to get rid of the heat. The PSU needs to be oriented to suck the air out of your chassis but the issue crops up two fold when you look at a downward drafting cooler like the C7 whereby the fans of the PSU and the cooler will fight each other.

The case wont fit in any kind of backpack and your shoulders will beg for mercy. The case when built is hefty. Better have it more smaller than that if you truly want to go SFF. You could also look at some custom cases over on SFFForums.net but they will cost youa pretty penny to downsize and have the same horsepower as a fully sized system.

FYI, you're also going to have thermal issues with the GTX1070 in there. If you google Compact...
Drop the H60, get the Cryorig H7.

If you're looking at an itx build, I'd say not to get the Elite 130. For the amount of depth in the case, you might as well by a torpedo :p IMHO. Get the Fractal nanos S or the Phanteks Evolv itx. If you want to get something more compact, yuo could look at custom build itx cases but you're going to need an SFX PSU which will push your build's cost up.

Outside of what I've stated, you're good to go with the list you've spec'd. Only that it's going to run hot in there.
 
Jun 26, 2018
2
0
10
The main reason I chose the elite 130 was because of its dimensions (depth is 370mm and rest is < 300 so it would fit in my backpack if I ever needed...) Is there a way to improve cooling inside the Elite 130? I’d rather have the size that can still fit fully sized desktop gpu’s over the aesthetics :p

Edit: nvm what I said, I thought you said C7... the H7 won’t fit in the Elite 130 case, and as you can tell from above I’d rather have that case for its compactness whilst enabling for fully sized desktop gpu’s to be installed.
 
Let's look at it this way, the case is the issue when trying to get rid of the heat. The PSU needs to be oriented to suck the air out of your chassis but the issue crops up two fold when you look at a downward drafting cooler like the C7 whereby the fans of the PSU and the cooler will fight each other.

The case wont fit in any kind of backpack and your shoulders will beg for mercy. The case when built is hefty. Better have it more smaller than that if you truly want to go SFF. You could also look at some custom cases over on SFFForums.net but they will cost youa pretty penny to downsize and have the same horsepower as a fully sized system.

FYI, you're also going to have thermal issues with the GTX1070 in there. If you google Compact Splash (in my sig space) you'll understand that even custom watercooling in a compact space is troublesome but getting rid of the heat is the main task. I personally have worked in the Phanteks Entho Evolv itx and will soon dabble into the Fractal Nano S chassis. I've also worked in the Cooler master N200 and the two itx(commercially available) cases mentioned prior are the same depth, height, width and volume wise as the N200. The only difference to the N200 is that you're able to get some good hardware in the chassis and offer less compromises. The three cases mentioned(in this paragraph) all support custom and AIO watercooling and with good large radiator support. So they have their niche and preferences in the market.

The key word here is compromises since you're having to trade off things in order to cram particular hardware into a shoe box(essentially speaking). The issue you'll learn soon after the build is that thermals will cause the fans to ramp up and the subsequent noise to your side being a bother. If you've got OCD, this will be bad on all fronts.

Don't think I'm trying to dissuade you from buying the Elite 130. The thing I tend to do is inform you of what the limitations or peaks are and that helps you make an informed decision.
 
Solution